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Opening 


1 


Current 'Events 


28 


J4cademics 


38 


J%:tivities 


74 


Student ijfe 


128 


Sports 


176 


Perspectives 


248 


♦Seniors 


262 



^ - 




SuB Turri 1992 




(Boston CoCCege 

Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 
Volume LXXX 



Opening 1 



1 tell you, Boston has opened and kept open 
more turnpikes that lead straight to free 
thought and free speech and free deeds than 
any other city . . 

-Oliver Wendell Holmes 



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Opening 3 




4 Opening 




Opening 5 





Cheryl Simrany 



6 Opening 




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Joanna Arong 




Tina Ting 



8 Opening 




Opening 9 



We 



e must use time creatively... and forever 
realize that the time is always ripe to 
do right. 

-Martin Luther King, Jr. 




Heide M. Bronke 



10 Opening 




!hefyl Simrany 



Opening 11 




Cheryl Simrany 



12 Opening 




Joanna Arong 



Opening 13 



xomorrow, God isn't going to ask: 

What did you dream? What did you think? 
What did you plan? What did you preach? 
He's going to ask: What did you do? 

~M. Quoist 




Cheryl Simrany 



14 Opening 



Cheryl Simrany 






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Opening 15 




16 Opening 



J. (DonaCdMonaitj SS 
Unwersity 'President 



iFie i^story of ®)ston College 



When Father John McElroy was 
assigned to Boston in 1847, he saw 
there was a need for more Catholic 
schools. After encountering many 
problems and much prejudice, he 
secured the purchase of a piece of 
land on Harrison Avenue in the 
South End of Boston. About a year 
later in April of 1858, the cornerstone 
of Boston College was laid as con- 
struction started on the building of a 
church and school, which were fin- 
ished by 1860. Unfortunately, the 
Jesuit province did not have enough 
priests to run this new school so it 
was instead used as a seminary for 
several years. Finally, on September 
5, 1864, Boston College opened with 
a student population of twenty-two 
boys. However, at first the school 
could not graduate any of its 
students because it did not offer the 
final year of philosophy necessary in 
order to obtain one's degree. In 1876, 
Father Fulton changed this and 
made the last year of philosophy 
available. On June 28, 1977, nine 
young men comprised the first grad- 
uating class of Boston College. 

In January of 1907, Fr. Thomas 
Ignatius Gasson became the thir- 
teenth president of the school and a 
few months later he started to 
pursue the purchase of a plot of 
land. After securing the purchase of 
the land, he immediately set about 
fund raising for the development of 
the land. The initial work on the first 
building, the Tower Building, which 
later became known as Gasson Hall, 
began in 1909 and was not com- 
pleted until the spring of 1913. 



Slowly Boston College grew in 
size through trying to help meet the 
needs of society and the area's Cath- 
olics. The College of Arts and 
Sciences, which embodies the lib- 
eral, Jesuit tradition, is the oldest 
and most extensive school of the 
College. In an effort to provide a 
better, more advanced education, 
the college formed the Graduate 
School between 1925-1926, through 
the reorganizing of the school's 
advanced courses. The School of So- 
cial Work, which opened in Sep- 
tember of 1936 with the enrollment 
of forty students, was started by 
Father Walter McGuinn to teach so- 
cial work in respect to Christian 
principles. The College of Business 
Administration (which later became 
known as the Carroll School of Man- 
agement) had its origins in four 
courses of accounting which were 
given as electives for upperclass- 
men. They Were so popular that the 
president. Father William McGarry, 
decided that a new school should be 
created to offer students instruction 
in the basics of business. On Sep- 
tember 16, 1938, the College of Busi- 
ness Administration opened with 
seventy-two students. The School of 
Nursing, which opened in 1947, was 
formed through the influence of Car- 
dinal Gushing, who felt that a pres- 
tigious. Catholic nursing school was 
important. Similarly, the Law 
School, which started up in 1929, 
emerged out of the recognized need 
for a renowned. Catholic Law 
school. 

At the beginning, Boston College 



was a school dedicated to the educa- 
tion of men. It was the School of 
Nursing that brought an end to this 
novelty of an all-male under- 
graduate student body. Five years 
later it was joined by the School of 
Education. However, it was not until 
1970-1971 that coeducation was ex- 
tended throughout the under- 
graduate level. 

The last major development in the 
history of our school was the choice 
to consolidate with Newton College 
of the Sacred Heart. Newton Col- 
lege, suffering from a tremendous 
debt, could no longer function finan- 
cially and sought to become a part of 
Boston College. An agreement was 
reached and between June of '74 and 
June of '75, Newton College merged 
with Boston College providing more 
greatly needed space. 

The history of Boston College is 
one that pays testament to the con- 
stant achievement of its motto "Ever 
to Excel." It is doubtful that Father 
McEIroy ever dreamed that his 
fledgling school would grow into 
such a prestigious New England uni- 
versity. Boston College has grown 
from a student population of 
twenty-two in 1864 to approximately 
8,500 undergraduates in 1992. 

— James J. Conner 
(All information in this article was 
obtained from History of Boston Col- 
lege: From the Beginnings to 1990 by 
Charles F. Donovan, S.J., David R. 
Dunigan, S.J., Paul A. FitzGerald, 
S.J.) 



History of Boston College 17 



Cheryl Simrany 



Below: O'Neill Plaza: the 
daydreamer's view. 




18 Campus 




Heide M. Bronke 



Campus 19 



Joanna Arong 




Above: "... I know I could get 
into Harvard Med if they could 
just see me dissect a pizza!" 
Right: Whoever said College 
Road was a prison sentence 
obviously never visited Roncalli. 




Cheryl Simran 



20 Campus 



\ A SimranvAlevindm Ciannino 




una Arong 



Campus 21 



Above: B.C. Alumnus, Doug Flutie, 
showing his support at November's 
B.C. — Miami game. Right: "MOM! 
I told you never to call me here!" 



22 Campus 





Campus 23 



Cheryl Simrany 




Susan Brown 



24 Campus 




Left: Studying incognito. Below: The 
O'Connell House courtyard gets snowed. 




hervl Simianv 



Campus 25 



Right: (From Right to 
Left) Brian Armstrong, 
Jeremy Ball, Brian 
Renzi, Jim Mastroianni 
and Michael Ricciardi 
practice their Spanish 
speaking abilities while 
Anthony Malangini 
sleeps on the floor of the 
newly renovated 
Campion building. 












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Above: A patriotic car 
after the first snowfall. 
Right: Arnie Lohmann 
blows out the candles 
on his most triumphant 
birthday cake. 



26 Campus 






Above: A B.C. 5-0 car ready 
for action. 

Left: Igor, a B.C. mailbox, 
being attacked by a flyer. 



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28 Current Events 



CURRENT EVENTS 



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he old is crumbling down- 
the times are changing- 
And from the ruins blooms a 
fairer life. 

~ Sir Theodore Martin 



Current Events 29 







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UWAIT OIL WELL FIRES 



During the seven-month Iraqi occupation 
of Kuwait, more than 730 oil wells were 
damaged or set ablaze. Firefighting crews 
have been able to extinguish 584 wells since 
the effort began in March 1991. 

When the effort to combat the blazes began 
in March, it took an average of four days to put 
out each well fire. Now the teams are averag- 
ing 8.5 wells each day, according to Oil Min- 
ister Hamous al-Rquba. 

Teams from the United States, Canada, 
China, Iran, Kuwait, Hungary, and France are 
all working together to clean up this environ- 
mental disaster. 




ir^^ip" 



PERATION WELCOME HOME 



Desert Storm Commander General H. Norman Schwarzkopf gave a 
thumbs up to the crowd as he made his way up Broadway during New 
York's Operation Welcome Home ticker tape parade in June 1991. A 
fireworks extravaganza capped off the celebration. 

Schwarzkopf, General Colin Powell and Defense Secretary Dick Cheney 
were the grand marshals of the New York parade, with over 600,000 people 
turning out to welcome the soldiers home. More than 1 million people 
attended a welcome home parade May 19 in Hollywood, and an estimated 
800,000 turned out for the parade in Washington. 

"U.S.A.! U.S.A.!" the flag-waving crowd chanted during a half-hour of 
nighttime fireworks over the East River in New York City. The $1 million 
display was accompanied by the New York Pops Orchestra. A teary-eyed 
Korean War veteran said, "These young boys put their lives on the line and 
now they're getting their reward." 






30 Current Events 




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7 ECONOMIC SUMMIT 



Leaders of the world's seven largest 
industrial democracies began arriving 
in London on July 1 4, 1 991 , for the July 
15-17 economic summit focusing on 
aid for the Soviet Union. 

Mikhail Gorbachev made a two- 
hour presentation to the leaders of the 
United States, Britain, Canada, France, 
Germany, Italy and Japan that closely 
followed the 23-page letter he had sent 
to each of them the week before. 

By the close of the summit, the Group 
of Seven had offered Gorbachev tech- 
nical assistance and a special association 
with the International Monetary Fund, 
but not the enormous economic aid he 
had sought. 




IP 



AUL SIMON IN CENTRAL PARK 



Paul Simon is still singing after all of these years. On 
August 1 5, 1 991 , Simon and a 1 7-piece band drawn from five 
nations stepped on stage in Central Park for a free concert 
lasting almost three hours. Erstwhile partner Art Garfunkel 
was not, however, by his side. 

The concert was a retrospective of Simon's career, from 
the simple beginnings of low-budget doo-wop of the '50s in 
Queens, NY to the pulsating South African sounds and 
rhythms of his 1986 "Graceland" album and the Afro- 
Brazilian drumming and Antonio Carlos Jobim chord 
chemistry of his latest, "The Rhythm of the Saints." 

The Central Park concert, attended by over 500,000 fans, 
was part of a longer trip, a pause in his "Born at the Right 
Time" tour of almost 14 months that ended in Africa after 
stops in Japan, China, Australia, and South America. 



Current Events 31 




OUP IN THE SOVIET UNION 



Soviet President 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
and his family were 
placed under house ar- 
rest in the Crimea on 
August 19, 1991, as an 
eight-man emergency 
committee led by Vice 
President Gennady 
Yanayev took power in 
a coup attempt in the 
Soviet Union. 

Crowds of perplexed 
people wandered among 
the many Soviet tanks 
parked behind the Red 
Square during the mili- 
tary coup hours. 



Convoys of Soviet taiiks moved 
into Moscow, less than two miles 
from the Kremlin. The Commu- 
nist hard-liners who ousted 
Gorbachev sent the army's tanks 
rolling within a mile of the Russian 
Parliament building where Rus- 
sian President Boris Yeltsin was 
staying. 

Yeltsin called on Russians to 
resist the takeover, and resist they 
did. Constructing a protective 
human wall around Yeltsin's 
headquarters, his supporters de- 
manded Gorbachev's return. 

As a former Gorbachev adviser 
spoke to the crowds, denouncing 
the coup and demanding that 
Gorbachev be allowed to address 
the Soviet people, hands were 
raised in applause. 




32 Current Events 




On Wednesday, as the Communist Party de- 
nounced the takeover, Yanayev and the other 
coup leaders fled Moscow. Latvia and Estonia 
declared immediate independence from the So- 
viet Union. 

Before dawn on Thursday, August 22, an 
Aeroflat jet arrived at Vnukovo airport, Moscow, 
bringing home Gorbachev and his entourage. 

The coup had failed, and before the day was 
through, all coup leaders were arrested except 
for Interior Minister Boris Pugo, who reportedly 
killed himself. 



Russian President Boris Yeltsin waved the white-blue-and-red Russian flag 
from the Russian Federation building before a crowd of about 100,000 jubilant 
supporters celebrating the end of the three-day coup attempt. Bodyguards held 
bulletproof shields in from of him. 

In addition to the telephone service being cut to all KGB buildings and 
Gorbachev naming a new chief of the KGB, the statue of the founder of the KGB 
was toppled while thousands of Muscovites watched. 

Current Events 33 





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Q)OUTH AFRICA 

President F.W. de 
Klerk, Africar\ Na- 
tional Congress 
president Nelson 
Mandela and the 
Zulu Inkatha leader 
Mangosuthu Buthelezi 
came together in Sep- 
tember 1991 when 
black and white lead- 
ers gathered to sign a 
peace pact in a bid to 
end faction fighting 
that has claimed hun- 
dreds of lives in South 
Africa. 

The accord, which 
created groups to in- 
vestigate violent acts 
by police and citizens, 
marked the first joint 
agreement between 
the government and 
the two main black 
movements. It was 
also seen as an impor- 
tant test of whether the 
main political groups 
can work together for 
reforms to end white- 
minority rule. 




R. SUESS 



On September 24, 1991, Mr. Theodor 
Seuss Geisel, died in his sleep. The 87- 
year old man was author of many 
children's books, including "Cat in the 
Hat" and "How the Grinch Stole 
Christmas!" 



34 Current Events 







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LARENCE THOMAS 

Fort}'-three year year old Clarence Thomas grew up poor, Black and Democratic 
Ji Pinpoint, Georgia, but later switched parties and became a controversial symbol 
oi Black conser\'atism. 

Only in America," Thomas said after President Bush armounced his nomination 
as the second Black justice on the Supreme Court. Thomas succeeded Thurgood 
Marshall who retired. Prior to Thomas's nomination to the Supreme Court, he served 
as an assistant attorney general in Missouri, a legislative assistant to Sen. John 
DaT\torth, seven years as chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 
and a judge of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. 

In addition to the controversy of Thomas' legal views, a charge of sexual harass- 
ment was brought against him by law professor Anita PiiU. Thomas vehemently 
denied the allegations and said, "This is Kafkaesque. Enough is enough." After much 
debate over u-ho was right and who wrong - Clarence Thomas, Anita Hill, the system 
itself - the United States Senate voted to corvfirm him, 52-48. It was the narrowest 
margin in the histor\' of Supreme Court confirmations. 

On October 18, 1991, Clarence Thomas became the 106th United States Supreme 
Court Justice. 



NITA HILL 

Life has not been the same for law professor Anita 
Hill since going public with allegations that Supreme 
Court Justice Clarence Thomas sexually harassed 
her nearly a decade ago. 

Although Thomas was confirmed, professor Hill 
insisted that by letting her story be known she had 
accomplished everything she set out to do. "All 
that's happened has made the general public much 
more aware of sexual harassment than ever before," 
said Hill. 



Current Events 35 



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IF, 



IVE U.S. PRESIDENTS 
OPEN REAGAN LIBRARY 

Ronald Reagan threw open the doors of his 
presidential library on November 5, 1991, and 
invited the public to judge his turn in the White 
House. 

A military band played "Hail to the Chief" 
and the crowd of 4200 invited guests cheered 
as President Bush and former Presidents Carter, 
Nixon and Ford joined Reagan in the first 
gathering ever of five past or current presi- 
dents. 

The Spanish-style structure is nestled on 
100 acres about 50 miles from Los Angeles. At 
153,000 square feet, it is the largest presidential 
hbrary and includes 55 nullion documents from 
Reagan's presidency, available for public in- 
spection. 




OSTAGES 
RELEASED 

Freed Americans Jo- 
seph Cicippio, Terry 
Andersen, and Alann 
Steen stood before a 
cheering crowd, cel- 
ebrating their releases 
from Lebanon. 

On December 2, 1991, 
Joseph Cicippio was re- 
leased in Beirut. He was 
taken hostage by a Shiite 
Muslim Group in 1986. 
Alann Steen, who was 
kidnapped from Beirut 
University in 1987, was 
released on December 3. 
The last American hos- 
tage, Terry Andersen, 
was freed on December 
4. He was the longest 
held hostage, spending 
seven years in captivity. 



36 Current Events 




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AGIC JOHNSON 



Magic Johnson, whose 
beaming smile and sparkHng 
play entertained basketball 
fans for more than a decade, 
announced on November 7, 
1991, that he had tested posi- 
tive for the HIV virus and was 
retiring. 

"Because of the HIV virus I 
have attained, I will have to 
announce my retirement from 
the Lakers today," Johnson told 
reporters at the Forum, where 
he played 1 2 superstar seasons 
with the Los Angeles Lakers. 

"I plan on going on, living a 
long time," he said. Johnson 
said he would become an AIDS 
activist and campaign for safe 
sex. 

More than just a basketball 
star who led the Lakers to five 
NBA championships, Johnson 
has been a philanthropist, a 
prominent corporate spokes- 
man and a role model for 
young people. His broad grin, 
familiar nickname and electri- 
fying ability have made him a 
household name to people 
around the world. 

"I'm going to go on, I'm go- 
ing to beat it and I'm going to 
have fun," he insisted, dis- 
playing some of the irre- 
pressible zest for life that he 
brought daily to the basketball 
court. 

Johnson will be part of the 
U.S. Olympic Basketball team 
at Barcelona this summer. 



Current Events 37 



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38 Academics 



ACADEMICS 




♦ ♦ ♦ X hat is what learning is. You 
suddenly understand something 
youVe understood all your life, 
but in a new way 

~ Doris Lessing 



Academics 39 



ii-.-^-f& 




COLLEGE OF 
ARTS & SCIENCES 



-"^"'•"'^'•''■^■•■'^ 



Gasson 
Hall 



If there is one memory of Boston 
College shared by every alumnus, 
it is the striking image of Gasson 
Hall. Named after the thirteenth 
president of Boston College, 
Thomas I. Gasson, S.J., this mag- 
nificent building was begun in 1909 
and completed in 1913, thus being 
the first structure to grace the 
campus at Chestnut Hill. Father 
Gasson oversaw the planning and 
construction of what was originally 
called the Tower Building. In 1977, 
Gasson Hall was renovated and re- 
dedicated to honor the man who 
made the centerpiece of Boston 
College's campus a reality and an 
inspiration for generations to 
come. 




Cheryl Simn 




J. ROBERT 

BARTH, S.J. 

DEAN 



ir\i Simranv 



To the Class of 1992, 

You are a class with whom I feel a special bond, because we started as fresh- 
men together in the fall of 1988. However, while you will be graduating and 
going on to the next stage in your life — new careers and new activities — I'll 
be staying on to mind the "deanery" here in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Be assured, though, that you will continue to have a special place in my hearts 

We have seen many changes during your four years at Boston College: the 
opening of the new Chemistry Center, the celebration of the tenth anniver- 
sary of Robsham Theater, the recent opening of our new Academic Develop- 
ment Center, all the work of faculty and students on the revision of the Core 
Curriculum — all things that will remain as a lasting contribution to the life of 
this very special academic community. 

But many things have remained the same: the same intellectual excitement, 
both in and out of the classroom, the same close relationship between faculty 
and students, the same strong sense of community that has always been a 
hallmark of the Boston College we know and love. 

Boston College wUl continue to change but will always remain, in its es- 
sentials, the same. When you return to visit, as I hope you will do often, you 
will see changes as the years go on, but we trust it will always be what it has 
been for you — a community founded on faith in God, on loving concern for 
one another, and on the sense of our larger responsibility to the world around 
us. 

As alumni of Boston College, you wUl carry the light of faith and love wher- 
ever you go, and we know that the world will be a better, more just, more 
caring place because of what you bring to it in your work, in your family lives, 
and in your community. The Lord bless you with peace and joy in all the days 
and years to come! 



Alexandra Gianirmo 



Right: "Why are we the 
only ones doing work?" 
Below: An aerial view of 
the inside of the new 
Chemistry Building. 




42 Arts and Sciences 




Top Left: The total resale value of all these books is $5. 

Top Right: "I've got to start taking showers before I go to 

class." 

Left: "I can write on the board without looking at it." 

Above: "Should I tell her the truth about her paper?" 



Arts and Sciences 43 



Hs 




ARROLL SCHOOL 
OF MANAGEMENT 



.^-^.!,^i^'.^f 



JOHN J. 

NEUHAUSER 

DEAN 




Fulton 
Hall 



The idea for Fulton Hall was con- 
ceived in 1938, when the need for sep- 
arate quarters for the College of Busi- 
ness Administration became des- 
perate. Prior to this, students were 
constantly being shifted from build- 
ing to building as enrollment grew 
rapidly. However, the budget for this 
first postwar project was sparse, so 
students and other volunteers went 
door-to-door selling "bricks" for 
Fulton Hall at the cost of one dollar 
per brick. Upon its completion in 
1948, the building was named Fulton 
Hall to honor Robert Fulton, S.J., who 
served two terms as President of the 
College. 





le M. Bronke 



JAMES L. 
BOWDITCH, 

PH.D. 
ASSOCIATE 

DEAN 

Undergraduate 

Division 




First and foremost, congratulations on your graduation from the Carroll School of 
Management at Boston College. As a group, you have worked hard and well to achieve 
your goals in management. Being a teacher and a friend, and being further along in the 
pilgrimage of life, I'd like to leave you with some thoughts about your future, and how to 
keep it interesting. 

Try to attain some balance in your lives. It is one thing to work 80 hours a week for 
periods of time as long as it doesn't become a habit. It is quite another to always work 80 
hours a week. It reminds me of a story I heard some years ago, I am not sure where. A 
new priest was seeking advice from his bishop about how much time he needed to put in 
to parish work. The priest was young and loved to play golf. The bishop looked at him in 
a kindly way and remembering that the priest had a passion for golf, the bishop said; 

"Tom, if you shoot under 80, you are neglecting your parish; on the other hand, if you 
shoot over 95, you are neglecting your golf." 

Many of us in fields of management neglect those things that help us achieve a bal- 
anced life; a good book, our family and friends, personal development and recreation 
time. Life is too short to spend aU of our time at work; it is also too short to fritter away 
time without goals, aspirations and hard work. Keep a good book "going" at all times; 
remember that your friends need calls and letters from you periodically. Plan to keep on 
educating yourself, either in formal graduate training, or informally. You may be gradu- 
ating in 1992, but think of it as the commencement, or beginning, for the rest of your life. 
Continue to develop those intellectual interests in which you have recentiy become 
interested. You will enjoy life more, and you will make life more enjoyable for others. 
Finally, continue to make room for recreation and athletics. A couple of months away 
from Boston College will convince you that we have had wonderful facilities here, get- 
ting space to stay in shape both physically and intellectually will be more difficult in the 
future. We have great library and recreation facilities. Give yourself the opportunity to 
remain in shape. Life will be more enjoyable if you do. 

Finally, give back something to the society that has nourished you. As a culture, we're 
pretty individualistic. Still, the notion of working towards the common good has been a 
major part of our cultural history as well. In my own mind it is best captured by those 
famous Hnes spoken by President Kennedy at his inauguration; "Ask not what your 
country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country." Do something for the 
public good, have fun, and come back and visit us often. 



CaTro'ii 



Heide M. Bronke 



Right: "Do you think we can 
pick the lock?" 

Bottom Right: "I spent how 
much on this book?" 
Bottom Left: "Can you guess 
what school we're in?" 
Below: "My God, my God, why 
have you forsaken me?" 




a— 



I 



I 





f m 





\^ 









Cheryl Simrany 



46 Carroll School of Management 



Heide M. Bronko 




M. Bronke 



Carroll School of Managemer\t 47 






SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION 



mssmmsmsmmsmm^m 



Campion 
Hall n 



The year 1955 saw the completion of 
the new location for the School of Edu- 
cation. Ground was broken on October 
7, 1954 for the building named Cam- 
pion Hall, one of the least costly struc- 
tures on campus. Essentially, Cam- 
pion Hall was built for plumbing 
reasons as more and more women 
were entering the Boston College com- 
munity, and the facilities in Gasson 
Hall were no longer adequate. The first 
School of Education class spent their 
senior year in the newly erected struc- 
ture built of brick and stone. Since its 
opening in 1955, Campion has seen 
some changes, the most recent re- 
modeling effort having begun in the 
Spring of 1990. No doubt, this exten- 
sion to the building will be welcomed 
by the campus school, and will allow 
the College to expand its horizons both 
educationally as well as physically. 




Cheryl Simr; 






DIANA PULLIN 
DEAN 



Dear Graduates of the Class of 1992, 

The 1992 academic year marks an exciting turning point for the School of 
Education, as the year brings both the fortieth anniversary of the founding of 
the School of Education and the completion of a long term, mulHmillion dollar 
project to renovate Campion Hall and add a ten million dollar new wing to the 
building. The excitement the faculty and staff feel about the opportunities 
presented by the new facility mirror our excitement for the graduates in the 
Class of 1992 as they enter the world of work and further professional educa- 
tion. 

The opportunity afforded by the celebration of forty years of accomplish- 
ment as a School of Education provides an exciting opportunity to reflect on 
the Jesuit tradition of the preparation of young men and women for service to 
others. Boston College has been known for many years for the quality of its 
undergraduate programs to prepare teachers and other human services pro- 
fessionals. The graduates of 1992 will make an outstanding contribution to- 
ward continuing this tradition. With their extensive preparation in the liberal 
arts and sciences and their strong preparation in education and human de- 
velopment, the graduates of the Class of '92 are well prepared to face the 
professional challenges confronting our changing society as it struggles to 
address critical education needs and pressing human services dilemmas. 

The faculty and staff of the School of Education join me in congratulating 
and extending best wishes to each member of the Class of 1992. 



Schot) 



Cher\-1 Simrany 



Right: "Aren't I cute?" 
Below: The academic seda 

tives. 




Right Middle: "Bet you can't tell 1 just had reconstruc 

tion." 

Right Bottom: "Where do they get this stuff?" 



50 School of Education 



na Arong 



Left: "What are you talking 

about?" 

Bottom Left: "Go forth and 

educate the ignorant." 

Below: "Excuse me, what 

building are we in?" 







School of Education 51 



'^iWl 



SCHOOL OF 
NURSING 



"it-eysiwga-sffiw: 



^'^^^^ 



Gushing 
Hall 



Archbishop Richard Gushing 
was instrumental in inspiring the 
School of Nursing here at Boston 
College. He saw a need for more 
nurses who had achieved a Bach- 
elor's degree at a Catholic uni- 
versity, so he began a vigorous 
fund-raising effort which raised 
nearly one million dollars. The 
ground-breaking ceremony took 
place on February 20, 1959, with 
Cardinal Cushing presiding. On 
March 25, 1960, the new School of 
Nursing officially opened its doors. 
Appropriately, the new home of 
the nursing school was given the 
name of Cushing Hall, in recogni- 
tion of Cardinal Cushing' s pivotal 
role in its inception. 




Cheryl Simn 





er\'l Simranv 



BARBARA 

HAZARD MUNRO 

DEAN 



To the Boston College School of Nursing Graduating Class of 1992: 

Congratulations on your graduation and on your achievements during your 
four years at Boston College. I would like to acknowledge the warmth with 
which you welcomed me to the School of Nursing. It has been my pleasure to 
work with you this year. 

As you know, you enter Nursing at a time of great challenge and therefore, 
of great opportunity. The cost and quality of health care is receiving national 
attention with various strategies for redesigning health care delivery in the 
United States being debated. Although costs have not been spiraling upwards 
at an unprecedented rate, we have not seen similar improvements in quality. 
In fact, the United States has abysmal ratings in areas such as infant mortality, 
where we rank 24th worldwide. A major problem is inequitable access to 
health care services. 

Leaders in nursing are designing and testing new strategies for improving 
health care in America. They will be instrumental in affecting public policy in 
this area. Although the new structure is not clear yet, what is certain is that 
nurses will have more autonomy and responsibihty than ever before. 

Your education at Boston College has provided you not only with skills 
specific to the profession of Nursing, but also with a liberal arts core based on 
the Jesuit tradition. This is certainly a time when values and a sense of justice 
are of utmost importance. Use what you have gained here to improve the 
quality of care provided to the clients with whom you work. 

We are all proud of you and know that you will make us even prouder in the 
future. 



cnoo! 



Cheryl Simrany 



Right: A cross section like 
you've never seen it be- 
fore. 

Below: "We must teach the 
patients proper dental 
nygiene." 

Bottom Left: "Class, this is 
our dummy, Harry." 
Bottom Right: "Where did 
I put my glasses?" 




54 School of Nursing 



C nl Simrar 



ill 



Postural I 



L'ppcrlvobr 




Left: Students practice saving lives. 
Below: The new age of learning. 





E 

H N 



Left: "Thank God. If I can't read the 
chart, I can't read the scale!" 




hervi Simranv 



School of Nursing 55 



Cheryl Simrany 



Right: O'Neill Plaza white- 
washed in the early morn- 
ing sunlight. 

Below: Fetal-positioned 
student in the womb of ac- 
ademia. 



t 




Left: Newspapers in O gravity. 

Above: A student bonds with an O'Neill microfiche machine. 



Heide M. Bronke 



56 O'NeiU 



Heide M, Bronke 



Top: "People Learnins 
Bottom Left: "Girl Relaxing" 
Above: "Man Microfilming" 



Heide M. Bronke 



The two main libraries on 
campus are the O'Neill and Bapst 
Libraries. The Gothic Bapst is a 
transforming setting which in- 
duces the mind to want to learn. 
Mostly a study library, the Bapst 
also has a decent selection of non- 
academic books that offer a more 
productive distraction to 
students. 

In contrast, O'Neill library is 
the place to go if one wishes to do 
research or get caught up on re- 
serve reading. However, those 
who have attempted to do serious 
studying in O'Neill can attest to 
the fact that O'Neill acts more as a 
catalyst for socializing than any- 
thing else. 

One student recently re- 
marked, "My roommate 
showers, changes and puts on 
cologne before going to the li- 
brary." Perhaps the library has 
become such a meat market be- 
cause as we approach adult life 
we realize it would sound much 
better to tell our children, "I met 
your mother while studying in 
the library," instead of giving 
them the name of some seedy, 
windowlessbar, suchasMA's. Of 
course some people do not wan- 
der around just to scope. Some 
find great entertainment measur- 
ing the drool pools of the sleep- 
ing, while others like to find un- 
usual books and smell them. 

— James J. Conner 



-I 



O'Neill 57 




Top: Gargon Hall in all its regal splendor. 
Above: Student cracks the whip on academics. 
Right: Man takes relaxed approach to studying 



58 Bapst 




Bapst 59 




CROSS 




One honor a select group of A&S students achieve is entrance into Cros 
and Crown, a Jesuit honor society. Cross and Crown, the oldest honor 
society at Boston College, is comprised of those students who hold a 3.5 
GPA or above and who have done much for the school and its students 
through their involvement in extracurricular activities on campus. Its 
members are chosen by a committee, headed by Father Barth, who review 
the many applications, and choose from them those they feel are most 
worthy of this honor. Out of those invited to join Cross and Crown, 
several are awarded the title of Marshal and one person is given the title 
of Chief Marshal. The Chief Marshal is also asked to give a speech at 
commencement, since BC does not choose a valedictorian. 

Chief Marshal of the Class of 1992 is Daniel Ennis. Marshals are Ara 
Balikian, Geoffrey Chan, Lisa Noller, Jennifer Paul, Jayant Prabhu and 
Christina Se villa. 

-James J. Conner 



60 Order of the Cross and Crown 



i^ 



•*^,^' 






53 i; WIL-' ' 





One can not help but be 
amazed at the amount of con- 
struction which has been taking 
place on our campus in the past 
year. With scaffolding surround- 
ing Gasson Tower for a good part 
of the year, we all eagerly looked 
forward to seeing what great 
changes were being done which 
would transform the tower into a 
more majestic landmark. We 
could hear these changes occur- 
ring, but could not see them be- 
cause the building was masked by 
an extensive network of scaffold- 
ing. Finally the day came when 
the scaffolding came down and 
we beheld . . . well I am not ex- 
actly sure. When one worker was 
asked what was done on the 
tower, he replied, "Well, we put 
up the scaffolding and then took it 
down." 

The construction was heralded 
as necessary in order to enable the 
BC community to more fully live 
up to the school's motto, "Ever to 
Excel." The lack of space is a 
major problem for the school and 
although all of this work was the 
source of many inconveniences 
for the students, it has helped 
create more desperately needed 
space. The new Chemistry build- 
ing and the massive work being 
done on Devlin Hall in order to 
update it, will both help to boost 
the school's science and fine arts 
departments. Also, the addition 
to Campion offers more expand- 
ing space to the School of Educa- 
tion. 

— James J. Conner 



ide M. Broaxe 



Joanna Arong 



Construction 61 



Joanna Arong 



Joanna Arong 




Joanna Arong 



Matt Carl ■« 



62 Junior Year Abroad 



ta na Arong 




How could being given a cat to 
warm up your bed on a bitter 
autumn night in Scotland be a 
part of the college experience? 
. . . Through the Junior Year 
Abroad Program. For those 
students who had the courage to 
venture into this program, they 
were rewarded with a once in a 
lifetime chance to experience an- 
other country in a different way. 
Their experiences have become a 
part of them. One student de- 
scribed studying abroad as a 
unique experience because, in a 
way, you are able to become a 
citizen of a different country for a 
short time. Another found it re- 
warding because she said it lets 
you realize what you are capable 
of. 

For the Seniors graduating this 
year, their Junior Year Abroad 
was marked by the Gulf War and 
the fall of the Iron Curtain. These 
students had the chance to travel 
to Eastern Europe as it emerged 
from Communist rule. What most 
people merely heard about, they 
got to see. 

They also came to understand 
American culture from a new 
aspect. For one thing, they came 
to be able to recognize Americans 
easily because many of them wore 
L.L. Bean Anarak jackets and car- 
ried the Let's Go travel books. If 
asked whether or not they would 
do it again, most students who 
have participated in the JYA pro- 
gram would more than likely 
reply, "In a second." 

— James J. Conner 



i Arong 



Junior Year Abroad 63 



Below: "I have to get this done before 'Beverly Hills 

90210'." 

Right: "I'll just rest for a minute." 

Middle Right: "Dear Mom and Dad . . 



Joanna Arong 




Above: "I'm so bored." 

Right: "I can't miss my weekly edition of the police blot 

ter." 



Heide M. Bronke 



64 Study Lounges 



Heide M. Bronke 



ie M. Bronke 




p Right: "Why am I always stuck sleeping on the couch?' 

p Left: No free desks at the O'Neill. 

"eve: The CSOM library bathed in sunlight. 



Study lounges. An oxy moronic 
term, isn't it? Maybe an analyza- 
tion of the etymology of this term 
could help explain why so many 
socialize in the O'Neill . . . then 
again, maybe not. 

Most study lounges are con- 
veniently located in the base- 
ments of the dorms. This easy ac- 
cessibility, one would think, 
would help increase the amount 
of quality study time. Un- 
fortunately, it just allows for a 
greater host of distractions. The 
lounge mentality makes one more 
apt to carry on a conversation es- 
pecially because friends con- 
stantly come in to talk. You see, 
the studiers make others feel 
guilty, and so the procrastinators 
feel it is their duty to make them 
stop working and enjoy college 
before it passes them by. After all, 
the college experience is not just 
about studying. It is about the 
friends you make and the late 
night bonding sessions you have 
when you should be studying for 
that midterm the next day. 

The nicest thing about study 
lounges is that you can eat and 
drink there, unlike the library 
whose staff will confiscate any 
food that you do not successfully 
hide. You also do not have to 
worry about the crinkling of that 
potato chip bag which somehow 
seems to be amplified in the li- 
brary. 

— James J. Conner 



Study Lounges 65 





;«!'. 



Above: Work-study — You 

fotta love it! 
op Right: Stephanie loses 
her mind at the Career 
Center. 

Right: Abandon all hope, 
ye who enter here. 
Right Bottom: The sien 
says: DO NOT REMOVE! 



Cheryl Simrany 



Michael Morse 




66 Career Center 




Cheryl Simrany 




Top: Anal-retentive desk. 

Middle: Counselor helps student with job search. 

Above: "I feel so overwhelmed!" 



In today's world, it is easier to 
find the Career Center, than it is 
to find employment. Beginning 
Freshman year, the Career Center 
starts to bombard one with nu- 
merous mailings, which are 
quickly ignored — after all it's 
only Freshman Year. Un- 
fortunately, Senior Year comes 
quickly and many must come to 
learn how to use the center's re- 
sources. With a great wealth of in- 
formation and many helpful 
workshops, the Career Center 
can provide a student with a good 
strategic approach to resume 
writing, cover letters, job 
searches, and interviews. Upon 
entering the center's library, one 
can easily be overwhelmed by the 
volume of its resources. How- 
ever, with a little determination, 
some personal reflection, and 
some help from the center's 
advisors, one can usually track 
down a starting job to apply for. 

With the end of Senior Year 
approaching, many concerned 
parents are starting to put pres- 
sure upon their children to find a 
future job. A trip to the Career 
Center is an appeasing action 
many undergo in order to avoid 
further parental harassment. 

— James J. Conner 






J-'M-ii-S/iiiJ'^4> 



Career Center 67 



Heide M. Bronke 



Below: "After 12 hours, they lost mv printout!" 
Top Right: "Won't you be my neienbor?" 
Middle Right: Someone who actually writes their 

gaper in advance, 
ottom Right: Just look at those beautihil screen 
savers! 




Heide M. Bronke 



Heide M. Bronke 



68 Computing Facility 



idf M. Bronke 



i.i-m-R j 
gi \UTV I 







M. Bronke 



lop: 'Til just take someone else's paper." 
|.bove: A rear view of the computing facility. 



The O'Neill Computing Fa- 
cility (OCF) is one of the more 
used resources on the BC 
campus. It houses 116 Mac- 
intosh's and eight IBM's that 
endure a tremendous amount 
of work every single day, es- 
pecially during exam periods. 
When exams come upon the 
campus, the OCF is the one 
place to try to avoid. The wait 
for computers rivals The 
Eagle's Nest's noontime lines. 
Also, unfortunately, once you 
get a computer the waiting is 
not over yet. The standard 
waiting time for printouts is 
long enough for you to go 
home, grab a bite to eat, take a 
nap, study for an exam, go to 
White Mountain, write another 
paper, take another nap, gener- 
ally goof off, and still come back 
to wait for a few hours. The 
scary thing is you know that 
this is not much of an exaggera- 
tion. It's funny, because it's 
true. 

The OCF does not offer much 
to the student who is trying to 
avoid doing their work. One 
can always play with the insane 
number puzzle that is standard 
on every computer. Most find it 
more entertaining to watch 
some computer illiterate panic 
as they lose their assignment on 
the computer. Some like to read 
papers other students left on 
the hard drive. These papers 
are sometimes comforting to 
read because, upon compari- 
son, they make you feel better 
about your own work. 

— James J. Conner 






Computing Facility 69 



Ali Gianinno 




Top Right: "Abandon All Hope Ye Who 
Enter Here." 

Right: Headline: Professor falls asleep 
while reading student's paper. 



70 Professors' Offices 



All photos bv Annmarie \Vi\on 



Bottom Right: Prof. Kreeft's 
door displays the quotes of the 

treat philosopher Dilbert. 
elow: Prof. Ashley helps a 
distressed student via the tel- 
ephone. 




For most freshmen, the sight of 
a door to a professor's office 
strikes as much fear in their hearts 
as would the gates of hell. They 
seem to recall memories of visits 
to the principal's office and deten- 
tion. After a few visits, however, 
most students learn that these 
offices don't hold demons but 
rather people who thrill in of- 
fering help to enthusiastic stu- 
dents. It doesn't take much time 
for students to discover that visits 
to these offices cannot be avoid- 
ed. If one needs an extension (due 
to excessive procrastination) or 
help preparing for an exam, a 
professor's office is the place to 
go. After all, where else can you 
go if you are completely clueless? 

However, by the time senior 
year rolls around, professors' 
offices seem more like havens 
from the chaos of school rather 
than hell holes. They are places 
where one can go to for advice, 
help or simply cheering up. Upon 
graduating, many seniors realize 
that they must not only say good- 
bye to their friends, but also to the 
professors who have helped ed- 
ucate them during their four years 
at Boston College. 

Here are some of the doors and 
offices that can be found across 
B.C. From all of the philosophical 
cartoons on Professor Kreeft's 
door to the piles and piles of 
books that seem to control Pro- 
fessor Tresh's office, each office 
captures part of the professor's 
personality and charm. 



Professors' Offices 71 



Heide M. Bronke 



Right: The second string football 
players. 

Bottom Right: The rings on the 
trees date back to the gypsy 
moth years. 

Below: He's having a long con- 
versation with Mr. Pillow. 





Ali Gianinno 



72 Study Breaks 



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Top: "What did I do???" 

Bottom: "We're not going to let the eagle take flight." 



11:00 P.M., Exam Week . . . 
Arrrrrrgh! The Eleven O'Clock 
Scream is one of the most popular 
forms of stress relief here at BC. I*^ 
saves your sanity through in- 
sanity and most would say that 
they definitely feel better after the 
scream. Those that would not say 
that can't because they've utterly 
destroyed their throats. 

VCR's and Nintendo also offer 
students enjoyable periods of 
relaxation between studying. 
One can watch Bart join the mob 
on The Simpson's for the sixty- 
seventh time or try to break the 
high score in Tetris. Both can 
easily induce the student into ex- 
tending their break. 

Study breaks due to snow are 
one of the added benefits of at- 
tending college in New England. 
Many students take an im- 
promptu break when snow starts 
to blanket the ground. Snow ball 
fights, snow football, and sleigh 
riding using trays from the 
McElroy and Walsh cafeterias, 
provide some of the best mem- 
ories from college. 

The more inventive students 
seeks out alternative forms of the 
study break. Some find it relaxing 
to read about a class mass- 
psyching a teacher to death in one 
of the local tabloids, Other 
students just like to crawl in bed 
with someone and ... 

— James J. Conner 



'm 



sg^Ja^,>,c*«=/^ 






Study Breaks 73 




74 Activities 



ACTIVITIES 



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1 ime well spent 
Is not lost but still ours. 
And though past, 

these useful hours 
By eternity are lent. 



- Juan Ruf o 



UGBC 




Cheryl Simr. 



UGBC Senators Rob Brennan and Sean Curran are hard at work in the UGBC Senate Office. 



UGBC Senator Doug Hurley can always be 
found planning in the office. 




Cheryl Sli 



76 UGBC 




Cheryl Simrany 



e-President Elise DiCarlo and President Setti Warren. 




...UGBC's main focus is to 
serve you, the student body, 
and provide you with a 
number of services in order 
to make your four years at 
Boston College educational, 
exciting and 

memorable. ..Through di- 
verse social, cultural, and 
educational programs, 
UGBC has become the ve- 
hicle for students to program 
for other students. There are 
many ways that UGBC 
reaches out to the students 
for their input, but if there is 
ever something that you 
would like to see happening 
as a part of UGBC, let us 
know. The Undergraduate 
Government can only be as 
good as the involvement that 
the student body has in it, so 
get involved. We have ex- 
panded a number of the 
departments this year and 
we hope that they will help 
to include a greater number 
of students with a variety of 
interests. 

...We have many goals for 
this year and with your help 
we hope to achieve them all. 
The most important resource 
that UGBC has is the oppor- 
tunity for you to get in- 
volved. All it takes is a little 
interest and some self -initia- 
tive from you. Take the time 
to find out about your un- 
dergraduate government 
and what is available to you. 
Please do not hesitate to stop 
into the UGBC offices in 
McElroy and Murray House 
and let us know how we are 
doing. 

Sincerely, 
Setti Warren 
President, UGBC 



UGBC 77 




UGBC 




Cheryl Siinrany 



Nancy Drane, Lisa NoUer, and Roger McAvoy enjoy Salsa Night. 



r 



Representing The Student Body 



Created to provide 
and inform students 
about programs for the 
students, UGBC contin- 
ues to actively voice 
students' opinions to the 
rest of the university in 
a positive way. 

The executive cabinet, 
appointed by the Presi- 
dent and approved by 
the Senate, functions as 
the service division of 
the organization. Activi- 
ties include lectures and 



concerts. In addition, 
these departments serve 
to inform and advise 
students on many sub- 
jects such as tuition, 
legal advice, and the 
overall publicity of these 
events. Also in the 
cabinet are the Activities 
Funding Committee and 
the Finance Department, 
which insure that not 
only the governmental 
bodies can operate, but 
also allows the smaller 



organizations on cam- 
pus to run their various 
programs, and contrib- 
ute to the student body. 

The UGBC Senate is 
composed of eight 
elected representatives 
from each class. As the 
legislative branch of 
government, the Senate 
participates in oversee- 
ing the budget and 
approves the President's 
choices to the various 
divisions of govern- 



ment. 

Each year, UGBC sets 
goals and ideas that they 
hope will be enjoyable 
as well as informative 
for the whole student 
body. In keeping with 
this attitude, they en- 
courage students to get 
involved with every 
aspect of government 
and to take advantage of 
everything UGBC has to 
offer, jp 



78 UGBC 





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Cheryl Simrany 



ackqueline McLean, Vice-President of AHANA, is busy at the Patrick Reyes and Mark Duke debate an issue, 
lonnputer. 



Cheryl Simrany 




Kathryn Bishop can always find something to do as a Volunteer Coordinator. 



UGBC 79 






A day-tour makes its way to McElroy. 



Alexandra Gianinno Heide M. Bronke 

Dave Stevens is always kept busy as the Day Visit Coordinator. 




Heide M. Bronke 



You can always find prospective students and their parents in the Student Admissions lounge. 



80 S.A.P. 




Alexandra Gianinno 



SAP Coordinators: Front: Ronald Malloy, Dana Kawalautzki, Jeanne Hurley, Fred Paulmann. Row 2: Dave Stevens, Andrea 
Haberlend, Danielle Salvucci, Susan Selinga. 



r Continuing 


the Tradition 


of Excellence 




In 1975, the Student 


campus tours provide 


interested students 


impressive is that this 


Admissions Program 


prospective students as 


throughout the country. 


organization is com- 


was just getting off the 


well as their parents a 


and even the nation. 


pletely student run. 


ground. Today, SAP is 


formal look at the 


through high school 


These are student volun- 


the largest student run 


school, while the indi- 


visits, letter writing, and 


teers who truly care and 


organization on cam- 


vidual day visits are 


phone campaigns. 


believe in the school. By 


pus, with nearly 800 


more informal. These 


Members are also able to 


promoting the values 


volunteers. Due to the 


visits give the students a 


directly assist the uni- 


that BC stands for and 


nature of its activities. 


more personal look into 


versity in the selection 


the opportunities the 


SAP is not very well 


the average day of a BC 


of the future freshmen 


school has to offer, SAP 


kxiowTQ. However, 


student. 


class through student 


members are committed 


you've probably seen 


SAP is more than just 


interviews. The experi- 


to continuing the 


them in action before 


tours and day visits. 


ence is definitely re- 


University's timeless 


through its two most 


however. For instance. 


warding for everyone. 


tradition of excellence. 


visible programs. The 


SAP is able to reach 


What makes SAP so 


ph 



SAP 81 



The Heights 




Heide Bronke 



Despite the work, Elena Epatko always manages a j^^ ^^^^^ .^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

smile. 



Cheryl Simrany 




Being Photography Editor is more than just taking pictures as Kevin 
Keating shows us. 



L luT\ I Siinrany 

The sign reflects the spirit (and office) of The Heights. 



82 The Heights 




Heide Bronke 

The Heights Staff: Front Rozv: Elena Epatko, Kevin Keating, Joe McCafferty, 
Nicole Palina. Row 2: Lizanne Wnek, Jennifer Crawford, Ann Boehler, Pearl 
Frier, Maura Kelly. Row 3: J. P. Plunkett, Drew Adams, Scott Matarese, Erica 
LePore. Roiv 4: Sarah Alford, Diane Vankoski. 



Cheryl Simrany 

A familiar sight at Boston College, The 
Heights on their delivery day, Monday. 



The Eyes and Ears of Boston College 



The eyes and ears of 
Boston College, other- 
wise known as The 
Heights, has been in 
existence since 1919. 
Every Monday, students 
can be found in the 
lobby of McElrov, and 
else-\vhere throughout 
the school, grabbing 
their copy of this 
newsbearing paper. For 
Joe McCafferty w^ho is 
the News Editor and has 
been -ivith the Heights 



since his freshman year, 
"working on the paper is 
a lot of fun", but he is 
ready to admit that it is 
also "a lot of work," 
especially Sundays 
when "we're up until 
5:00 in the morning." It's 
obvious that the job of 
running and putting 
together a newspaper 
isn't an easy one, yet 
The Heights successfully 
meets this challenge 
every week. 



This organization is 
one of the largest on 
campus. In 1973, the 
paper became an inde- 
pendent, non-profit 
organization and today 
it is entirely self sup- 
porting. Staff members 
are responsible for all 
aspects of the paper, 
whether it be writing 
articles, taking pictures, 
or resolving behind-the- 
scenes business affairs. 
From the critical reviews 



to the insightful busi- 
ness tips, from the 
heated editorials to the 
amusing "Voices from 
the Dustbowl," there's 
always something to 
talk about. Together, 
they keep us aware and 
informed of current 
issues around the cam- 
pus as well as around 
the country, dd 



The Heights 83 



TM^Mif'^ 



The Bridge 




Susan Brown 



The Bridge Staff: Front Row: Elliot Hayes, Nicole Palina, Benjamin Poko. Rozv 2: Athena Efter, D.J. Peck, Melissa 
Shannon, Brad Roe. Row 3: T.R. Harrington, Kimberly Annick, Maureen Kennedy, Maureen Begley, Ian Kovalik, 
Sophia Germanides. Not Pictured: John Caruso, Stephen Smith. 




Bridging the Gap of Ignorance 



The name itself makes 
a statement, one incor- 
porating the underlying 
goal: "bridging the gap 
of ignorance" within the 
BC community. The 
Bridge is an editorial 
paper that was created 
in the fall semester of 
the 1990-91 school year. 
Under the direction of 
Editor-in-chief Nicole 
Palina as well as Eliot 
Hayes and Ben M'Poko, 
the paper came out with 



its first edition in Janu- 
ary 1991, immediately 
gaining the respect of its 
readers. 

The paper collects 
commentaries, short 
stories, poetry, and 
artwork from students 
as well as alumni, fac- 
ulty and staff. Topics 
range from international 
issues to those of local 
concern. The paper also 
consists of an editorial 
board which discusses 



in length which submis- 
sions to publish. The 
Bridge does not favor 
one viewpoint over 
another, but rather, tries 
to allow all sides the 
opportunity to be heard. 
What is important, as 
Palina states, is that 
"we're what the students 
want." The paper en- 
courages everyone to 
write for it is only in this 
way that its goal be 
achieved, as 



84 The Bridge 



Hiiak Out onUP lltrd Mtiitalilx. 



i \ 






The Observer 



Road 
The Observer 



Tina Ting 



Just a friendly reminder to its readers. 




Tina Ting 



The Observer Staff: Front Row: Loren C. Goloski, Christopher Kaczor, Molly Baldwin. Roiu 2: Carlton Galligan III, 
Travis Capio, Brian J. Mahoney, Maria Paz Gazmuri, Christopher D. Johnson, Jason Raia. 




Tina Ting 



The Observer awaits its eager readers. 



The Conservative Voice 


The Observer is the 


the ground for many of 


well known conserva- 


the most hotly debated 


tive voice of Boston 


issues on campus. The 


College. Since its cre- 


Observer promises a 


ation seven years ago. 


different slant on these 


The Observer offers 


issues. As the paper 


students a chance to 


states, "There's plenty of 


express themselves on 


politically correct think- 


issues ranging from 


ing on campus. But The 


racism to sexual 


Observer is different, 


discriminaitton. Natu- 


something 


rally, with these kinds of 


unorthodoxically ortho- 


issues, the Observer can 


dox." pb 


sometimes be very 




controversial, providing 





The Observer 85 




Heide M. Bronke 

The Stylus Staff: Eric Kokkonen, Ellen Walker, Dana Berthold, John Bolger, Megan McKeever, Ed Nawotka, Brooke Stroud. 



w Feeling a Tittle Creative? 


The publication of 


works of contemporary 


anxiety involved in 


Stylus, the literary 


literature. Stylus also 


gathering, creating, and 


journal of BC, is an 


includes photography 


publishing. Stylus 


event that is eagerly 


and original artwork. 


remains a BC tradition 


awaited by many stu- 


Anybody who walks by 


that has been here for 


dents. Published twice a 


the office in McElroy 


some 110 years. So the 


year. Stylus remains one 


and has dared to look 


next time you're feeling 


of the most innovative 


inside can see that Stylus 


a little creative energy 


literary clubs at BC. 


is an original and cre- 


stirring inside, put it to 


Since its creation in 


ative organization in 


some use, then stop by 


1882, Stylus has sought 


itself. The day before 


Stylus and see what 


to be an artistic medium 


publication is described 


happens, md 


for the undergraduate 


by editor Erik Kokkonen 




students of BC. In addi- 


as "hectic-very, very 




tion to the wonderful 


hectic." Despite the 





86 Stylus 





The Film Board 



Cheryl Simrany 



Eric Sturmer shows us that it is not all play at the Film 
Board. 




Cheryl Simrany 

Film Board: Front Row: Matt Sheppeck, Nicole Choiniere, Rob Dragon, Ed Hillman, Tiffany Back, James Teel, 
Jennifer Sullivan, Jessica O'Malley, Erik Blischke. Row 2: Austin Naughton, Rob Newman, Louis Tirino, Eric 
Sturmer, Chris Hahn, Tony Downing. 



r A Cure for those Boredom Blues 


Have nothing to do 


Queen", to thrillers, such 


sics, "Airplane" and 


this weekend, or just 


as "The Silence of the 


"Top Secret." The wide 


plain bored? Then how 


Lambs." The Film Board 


variety of movies offers 


about stopping by 


also had some special 


something for everyone. 


McGuinn or the Barry 


events including the 


and because they're free 


Arts Pavilion and catch- 


Kevin Costner film 


of charge, the Film 


ing a movie put on by 


festival with features 


Board presentations not 


the Boston College Film 


such as "Field of 


only give your wallet a 


Board? Your boredom 


Dreams", "Bull 


break, but they're also a 


will definitely stop here. 


Durham", and of course. 


great way to cure those 


This year the Film Board 


"Robin Hood: Prince of 


"boredom blues." al 


entertained their audi- 


Thieves." To give your 




ences with movies 


brain a break, there was 




ranging from classics. 


a special "double fea- 




such as "The African 


ture" of two zany clas- 





The Film Board 87 



WZBC 




"Coming to you live from WZBC is Dave Hallowell!" 



Cheryl Simrany 




Cheryl Simrany 



Cheryl Simrany 



The most unique wall on campus is inside the WZBC office. 



The door that most people never get to see, as 
it is always open! 



88 WZBC 




Cheryl Simrany 

rhe WZBC Staff: Front Row: Dave Pierre, Linda Paone, "Magnus" John Stone. Roiv 2: Petrina Katsikas, Jim Ouellette, Gary 
^eiserman, Mark Hynn, Tim Haslett. Roiv 3: Jim Neill, Maura Duvall, Rich LaDue, Alison Kane, Dave Hallowell. Rozv 4: 
Da\id White, Colin McCarthy. 



Its a Whole New Musical Experience 



"WZBC is a whole 
different experience as 
far as music and pro- 
gramming goes. It's a 
unique station," says 
Dave Pierre, WZBC's 
Music Director. WZBC 
is definitely not like 
other stations one can 
tune into on the radio. 
Switch the dial to 
90.3FM and listen to 
some ZBCRock, ranging 
from progressive rock to 
alternative music. 



WZBC has developed 
quite a reputation 
among the progressive 
rock bands, as well as 
among other college 
stations around Boston. 
The station is known for 
their Uvely interviews 
with bands like New 
Model Army and other 
less known local bands. 
Maura Duval, a DJ on 
WZBC, says "The music 
and the people are a 
refreshing change. ..and 



as a DJ, I finally get to 
meet the bands and 
learn the music that I've 
always listened to on 
ZBCRock." Working on 
the station is definitely a 
rewarding experience 
for everyone. WZBC not 
only provides the BC 
community with great 
music, but they also 
keep us up to date with 
local and national news 
every week, al 



WZBC 89 



The Fulton Debate Society 




Heidi M. Bronlte 

The Fulton Debate Society: Profit Row: Leza DiBella, Jennifer Paul, Darren Schwiebert, Craig Cerniello, Laura Oei, Wenyo Ho. Row 
2: Rob Berry, Dave Dering, Dilip Paliath, Jack Minnear, Chris Strunk, Bruce Harrington, Jr. 



r A Legacy of Tradition and Success 




What we now know 


name. Today, the Fulton 


nation, host and com- 


and presents the Fulton 


as the Fulton Debate 


Debate Society does not 


pete in prestigious 


Society Debate, in which 


Society was once a 


limit itself to just debat- 


tournaments. This year 


the winner becomes the 


group of students inter- 


ing, but encompasses all 


the Society resumed its 


recipient of the Futon 


ested in debating who 


facets of forensics. Policy 


winning tradition at 


Medal, as well as the 


got together not long 


debate, as well as indi- 


numerous competitions 


honor of having their 


after Boston College was 


vidual events such as 


among the likes of 


name placed on the wall 


established. A few years 


interpretation of litera- 


Harvard, Georgetown, 


of Gasson. The Fulton 


after its formation. 


ture and impromptu 


and many others. 


Debate Society, an 


Father Robert Fulton, 


speaking, are among the 


The Fultonians' activi- 


institution at BC since 


S.J. became the leader of 


favorite events of the 


ties do not end here. On 


its foundation, is con- 


the organization and 


club members. 


campus, the Society 


tinuing in the legacy of 


acted as moderator of 


EC's debators, along 


hosts exhibitions of 


success and tradition 


the society which, in 


with numerous colleges 


public speaking for the 


started over 100 years 


1890, would bear his 


and universities in the 


University community. 


ago. ip 



90 Fulton Debate Society 




The Dance Ensemble 



'<«»« 



These women know how to give it their all. 




Barbara Northcott Barbara Norlhcott 

With the right moves, they certainly know how to capture the audience's attention. This group is never short on creativity. 



w 



Fine Art and Entertainment 



The goal of the Boston 
College Dance Ensemble 
is to expose the BC 
community to dance 
both as a fine art and as 
a form of entertainment. 
Their "Shut Up and 
Dance!" concert in the 
fall was a complete 
success towards achiev- 
ing this goal. One is 
always struck by the 
diversity of their perfor- 
mances. They range 
from high energv jazz to 



soft and beautiful ballet. 
Some are fun and enter- 
taining while others are 
deep and full of symbol- 
ism. 

Members of the En- 
semble are chosen 
through intense audi- 
tions on the basis of 
their performances 
rather than training. As 
members of this group 
they must take on a lot 
of hard work through 
the rigorous rehearsals 



and training. They all 
agree, however, that it 
definitely pays off once 
performance time comes 
along. Once on stage 
they just try to have fun 
doing what they love to 
do best. Despite the 
difficult and exhausting 
moves, the group al- 
ways manage a smile for 
their audience. The 
Dance Ensemble strives 
to develop the talents 
and skills of individual 



members. It provides 
them with a means of 
self expression through 
the various forms of 
dance, mainly jazz, 
ballet, and modern. 
With such dedication 
and loyalty to their art, 
the Dance Ensemble will 
continue to successfully 
promote this beautiful 
form of fine art and 
entertainment, -ph 



The Dance Ensemble 91 



University Theater 




Heide M. Bronke 



Heide M. Bronke 



Jayd McCarty gives a convincing performance in "The Normal Costuming is another aspect of theater that is not always noted. 

Heart." 




Joanna Arong 



In "The Normal Heart," George Hahri's character is in the Doctor's office. 



92 University Theater 




Joanna Arong 



Michael Towers and George Hahn perform in "The Normal Heart.' 



Celebrating 10 years of Performances 



Since 1961, The Univer- 
sity Theater of Boston 
College has held great 
importance for both 
theater majors and those 
just interested in taking 
part in all aspects of the 
theater. As the set crew 
for "The Normal Heart" 
production stated, the 
theater is "like a 
vacuum; you get sucked 
in and you never re- 
turn." The University 
Theater has indeed 



drawn many people in 
and in turn, has pro- 
duced many plays over 
the past years. 

This is an important 
year for all those in- 
volved in the University 
Theater because they are 
celebrating the 10th 
anniversary of Robsham 
Theater, the site of all 
their performances. In 
honor of this special 
event, the first perfor- 
mance of the year was 



"Play It Again 
Robsham." 

Other plays put on 
this year by the Univer- 
sity Theater included 
"The Normal Heart" and 
springtime perfor- 
mances such as "Equus" 
and Shakespeare's "A 
Midsummer Nights 
Dream." 

Laurie Arm Fallon, the 
assistant stage manager 
for "Play It Again 
Robsham," describes 



being part of the pro- 
ductions of the Univer- 
sity Theater as "very 
time consuming, but 
rewarding to see the 
final product." This 
group has something for 
everyone, from perform- 
ing on stage to helping 
out with sets, costumes 
and make-up- and once 
you join it's hard to pull 
away, al 



University Theater 93 



"The Brick and the Rose" was performed in The Bonn Studio. 





Kevin Keating 

"Sleeping Beauty or Coma" provided comic relief from the stress of campus life. 



Kevin Keating 



The characters in "Sleeping 
Beauty or Coma" were interest- 
ing to watch and hear. 



1^ High Quality Theater 




The Boston College 


Each of the produc- 


Society on campus 


Dramatics Society, as 


tions is entirely student 


allows students and 


the oldest student orga- 


run and totally funded 


faculty to be exposed to 


nization on campus. 


through the profits from 


a high-quality variety of 


presented its 127th 


previous shows. By 


theater at an inexpen- 


season this year. Pro- 


participating in this 


sive price. As anyone 


ductions such as "Sleep- 


organization, students 


who has ever attended 


ing Beauty or Coma" 


are able to show off to 


one of their productions 


and "The Brick and the 


the public their talents 


can attest to, it is well 


Rose" kicked off the 


in directing, acting. 


worth attending. 


season. They were 


designing sets and 


Playing to sold-out 


followed by many other 


costuming. 


audiences, productions 


entertaining perfor- 


Having an organiza- 


are held in the Bonn 


mances of other student- 


tion such as the Boston 


Studio in the Robsham 


directed plays. 


College Dramatics 


Theater Complex, hf 



94 Dramatics Society 



Contemporary Theater 




The Contemporary Theater Coordinators: Front Row: Jennifer Good, 
Marnie Joyce, Paul Orefice, Maggie Gould. Row 2: Maggie Boland, Kim 
Gosen. 



Kim Porcelli, Ed Smith and Liz Sardella perform in 
"Coyote Ugly." 



Kevin Keating 



CTBC makes people think 



The Contemporary 
Theater of Boston Col- 
lege is a student run 
organization devoted to 
the presentation of 
productions that may at 
some times be contro- 
versial, but always 
relevant to contempo- 
rary society. 

The CTBC prides 
itself on showing plays 
that make us think 
about our relationships 
^vith other people and 



the world around us. 
Sometimes realistic and 
more often abstract, it is 
the goal of a CTBC 
production to make 
people question both 
themselves and the 
world they live in. 

This year, their season 
included such produc- 
tions as "Coyote Ugly" 
and the musical "Little 
Shop of Horrors." 

By not being afraid to 
tackle the issues and by 



showing plays not 
normally seen on stu- 
dent stages, CTBC offers 
an outlet for student 
creativity within direct- 
ing, acting, and design- 
ing of the sets. 

Productions are usu- 
ally held in either the 
Bonn Studio in the 
Robsham Theater Com- 
plex or in O'Connell 
House, hf 



Contemporary Theater 95 



f 



My Mother's Fleabag 



A member of the audience prepares Kara McNamara W 
and Regine Webster for the group's next act. K 




1^ 

Cheryl Simrany 




Cheryl Simrany 

My Mother's Fleabag: Amy Poehler, Elizabeth Sardella, Mat Gagne, Mike Burke {seated), Ross Haskell, Kara McNamara, Lena 
Reed, John Segrich, Regine Webster. 



Never At A Lost For Words 



A production of My 
Mother's Heabag, a 
improvisational comedy 
troupe of Boston Col- 
lege, is one of the most 
popular events on 
campus. Their shows 
draw a packed crowd 
every time. After attend- 
ing a show its not hard 
to figure out why this is 
so. Sonne routines are 
rehearsed, such as "Blue 
Planet," a skit about an 
environmentally aware 



superhero who wears a 
globe beachbaU on his 
head. Others routines 
are improvisational. This 
is when each member 
must put their talents to 
the test and when the 
audience gets to see the 
group at their finest. 
While some people 
would be at a total lost 
for words at just the 
thought of doing an 
improv act, the members 
of My Mother's Fleabag 



always manage to find 
something to say or do 
that gives way to a wild 
and outrageously funny 
show. When My 
Mother's Heabag ap- 
pears in O'Connell 
House, there is also 
nnusical entertainment 
by "Living Proof" which 
helps in creating a 
perfect atmosphere. This 
comedy troupe keeps 
BC laughing and always 
coming back for more.pb 



96 My Mother's Heabag 






Hello. . .Shovelhead! 




Heide M. Bronke 



Hello...Shovelhead! Cast: Rob Reese, John Newman, Luke Orefice, Paul Woods, Maria Boecke, Andrea Cappo. 



An Original Piece of Work 



In that mood again to 
blow off your work and 
have some fun, but don't 
feel hke going off cam- 
pus? Well, just stop by 
Gasson and get ready 
for a night of laughs 
while you catch a show 
put on by the one and 
only, unbeatable. 
Hello .. .Shovelhea d ! 

Hello... Shovelhead! is 
a student comedy 
troupe that was founded 
about four years ago. 



Led by Director Robert 
Reese and Assistant 
Director Maria Boeke, 
members of the group 
put their heads together 
to come up with two 
fantastic shows a year. 
Their hilarious fall 
performance was en- 
titled "Chewing Tinfoil." 
The group also puts 
together smaller pieces 
for Cafe Night and 
comedy festivals and 
has performed at other 



universities such as 
Tufts and Brandeis. You 
can even catch them at 
the comedy club Catch 
A Rising Star in Cam- 
bridge. 

How does the group 
come up with their 
material? It's just your 
typical intense brain- 
storming and rehearsals. 
Performance time is 
another story. For Maria 
Boeke, it's "a lot of fun. 
It's especially neat 



because you've written 
the stuff yourself. When 
you hear the audience 
laughing you know it's 
because of something 
you've done." Being part 
of this unique and wild 
group is definitely a 
rewarding experience 
for everyone involved. 
pb 



Hello...Shovelhead! 97 




The orchestra 

coritributes greatly 

to the concert. 



The group puts their heart into every performance. 



Joanna Aronj 





Joanna Arong 






^ Musical Excellence 






The University Chorale 


Handel's "Messiah", 


concert in the spring. 


group has even traveled 


of Boston College is a 


Mozart's "Requiem", as 


both at Trinity Chapel 


to Germany and cities 


group of 150 talented 


well as works by 


on Newton Campus. 


such as Rome, Paris, and 


men and women. This 


Berstein, Gershwin, and 


Accompanied by a full 


London to share their 


includes graduate and 


many others. In addition 


orchestra, the result is a 


talents. Under the direc- 


undergraduate students 


to these, the group also 


spectacular and beauti- 


tion of Dr. Peloquin and 


as well as faculty and 


performs major liturgi- 


ful musical experience. 


accompanied by the 


staff. The Chorale con- 


cal pieces composed by 


In addition to BC, the 


group's loyalty, dedica- 


tributes greatly to the 


Dr. C. Alexander 


Chorale has also per- 


tion, and talent, the 


musical culture of the 


Peloquin, the group's 


formed at such presti- 


University Chorale has 


BC community through 


director. 


gious places as the 


risen to the honor of 


their performances of 


The chorale generally 


Boston Symphony Hall 


being one of the finest 


both classical and con- 


has two major perfor- 


and the Kennedy Center 


collegiate choruses in 


temporary composers. 


mances a year, their 


for the Performing Arts 


the United States, ph 


Their repertoire includes 


Christmas concert and a 


in Washington, D.C. The 





98 The University Chorale 





Voices of Imani 



The Imani group is rich in culture and diversity. 



I'.uil J. Hezel 




Paul J. Hezel 



\'oices of Imani never fails to put feeling into their music and their performance. 



A Love of God and Music 



Voices of Imani is one 
of the choirs of Boston 
College. Their name is 
deri\'ed from the 
Swahili language, in 
which the word "Imani" 
means "faith." The Imani 
group tries to emulate 
their "faith" through the 
group and the music 
they sing. 

With the guidance of 
Director Hubert Walters 
and Student Director 
Jonathan Singleton, the 



Voices of Imani sing 
both religious and 
concert music. In addi- 
tion, they perform on 
campus and at churches 
and other universities in 
the Boston area. 

Although this choir 
focuses primarily on 
people of color, various 
other ethnic groups are 
represented here as well. 
Voices of Imani has 
become one of the finest 
singing groups of Bos- 



ton College. Among 
their many perfor- 
mances, thehighlight of 
the year was their 
Christmas concert which 
drew a record-breaking 
crowd. Imani's reputa- 
tion is growing and is 
most likely due to the 
members' enthusiasm 
and loyalty. As Walters 
said "Imani loves each 
other, loves God, and 
loves to sing!" al 



Voices of Imani 99 



The Bostonians 




Kevin Keating 

Susan Corcoran, Mark Schroffner, Jenny Gaus, Keri Gleason, Cole Stanton, 
ohn Donahue (lead). 



Alexandra Gianinnc 



Cole Stanton takes the lead at a Cafe performance. 



r Great Music and Entertaining Fun 



In the mood for some 
great music as well as 
some entertaining fun? 
The Bostonians are the 
ones to listen to. This 15 
member coed a cappella 
group has been around 
for about six years. To 
accommodate 
everyone's tastes, the 
group performs contem- 
porary songs, such as 
Madonna's "Like A 
Prayer" and more tradi- 
tional tunes like "Blue 



Moon." Favorites of the 
group, as well as the 
audience, include "In 
The Jungle," and The B- 
52's "Rock Lobster." 

The Bostonians 
topped off the year with 
the completion of their 
first tape which the 
members are very ex- 
cited about. The group 
performs throughout the 
year at various events 
including a Songfest in 
the spring. Although the 



group does perform 
outside of campus (even 
traveling all the way to 
California in October), 
the BC community 
remains their biggest 
fan. The group devotes 
much of their time 
practicing, especially the 
week before a concert, 
but does it all help? 
Although the audience 
would answer with a 
resounding "yes!", Lori 
Barker, president of the 



group, claims that, 
practice or no practice, 
before they get on stage 
they "never fell pre- 
pared." Nevertheless, 
the Bostonians always 
manage to have fun. 
This is something you 
just can't help but notice. 
Their concerts provide 
not only great music, 
but also great entertain- 
ment. It's no wonder 
they draw such enthusi- 
astic and loyal fans, dd 



100 The Bostonians 








Heide Broixke Heide Bronke | 


font Row: Eric Livvang, Andrew Cheng, Marty Nagle, Micael Benarc 


\. Row 2: Bill Lee, Joi Okada, 


Andy Caso doing his version of | 


I rr)- Yen, Andy Caso, Sam Sheng, Doug Schobel, Marco Pace, Mart} 


' Denning, Ian Brown. 


"Bad." 




r Variety^ Talent^ and tun 








Who keeps everyone's 


tradition. Their goal is 


BC and also travel to 


Heightsmen go on stage 




fingers snapping with 


"to put BC a cappella on 


other schools to show 


they're "psyched be- 




their entertaining musi- 


the map." Apparently, a 


off their talents. Not 


cause we know we're 




cal performances? The 


cappella music is begin- 


only are they busy 


going to have fun." 




Heightsmen do! The 


ning to get the recogni- 


performing, but in order 


Fun with a capital "F" 




Heightsmen is a 13 


tion it deserves, thanks 


to perfect their sound. 


is the perfect way to 




member male a cappella 


to such talents as the 


these guys spend a great 


describe this entertain- 




group. That is to say. 


Heightsmen. According 


deal of time gathering 


ing group. They sing 




they are an all vocal 


to Eric Liwanag, co- 


and arranging their 


everything from the 




group, performing 


music director of the 


music and, of course. 


Eagles to Michael Jack- 




without musical accom- 


group, a cappella is 


rehearsing. Liwanag 


son to James Taylor. 




paniment. This is only 


getting "big around the 


describes the 


Obviously this is the 




the group's third year in 


country and at BC." The 


Heightsmen as a "really 


perfect combination: 




existence yet they are 


Heightsmen performs at 


exciting group." Before 


variety and talent— lots 




quickly becoming a BC 


various events around 


he and his fellow 


of talent, dd 










The Heightsmen 1 


01 



BC bOp! 




Barbara Northcott 



Barbara Northcott 



BC bOp! performs at the Cafe. 



The vocalists provide that extra touch of jazz to the band. 



r 



And All That Jazz 



BC bOp! is one of the 
five bands serving 
Boston College. This 
band differs from others 
in that not only do they 
specialize in jazz music 
with the usual jazz 
instruments, but the 
group also features five 
vocalists performing a 
vast collection of music 
to please anyone. This 
talented group of musi- 
cians has pushed them- 
selves to the peak of 



their potential. Rigorous 
rehearsal and perfor- 
mances exemplify the 
sense of loyalty and 
commitment on behalf 
of the musicians and 
their strong leadership. 
Their dedication paid off 
when they were invited 
to Carnegie Hall to 
exhibit their talents. You 
can catch BC bOp! 
throughout the year at 
such events as Cafe 
Night. The ensemble 



also takes part in the 
Boston University Jazz 
Festival and ends the 
year with an annual 
Spring Concert at 
Robsham Theater. 
Outside of these activi- 
ties, the band serves as 
entertainment for re- 
unions, dances, school 
functions, and private 
parties. BC bOp! also 
serves the local high 
school music commu- 
nity by hosting the 



Annual High School 
Jazz Festival here at 
Robsham, with the two 
best bands getting the 
chance to perform with 
our jazz ensemble. With 
such dedication to music 
and fine arts, both in 
and out of the BC com- 
munity, it is no wonder 
that BC bOp! is, and will 
continue to be, a success, 
earning well deserved 
appreciation and respect 
from their audience, jp 



102 BCbOp! 



BC Sharps 




^ 



Kevin Keating 

The BC Sharps: Genevieve Buckley, Nicole Soils, Sarah Bastille, Vanessa Penna, Margo Stack, 
Xaomi Katagai, Jennifer Querijero, Laurie Goguen, Colleen McNamara, Kara McNamara. 



r 



A Style of Their Own 



With their black skirts 
and bright Tee's, this 
female a cappella group 
certainly have a style of 
their own. When you 
hear them sing you'll 
definitely agree that 
they fully live up to 
their name. The BC 
Sharps was created in 
the spring of last year 
when Wilma Joas and 
Caroline Davis wanted 
to get together a group 
of friends who shared 



the same talent. Al- 
though the Sharps are 
new to the BC musical 
scene, they are quickly 
gaining the recognition 
and success they de- 
serve. Their concerts are 
deUghtful and entertain- 
ing. The group performs 
a variety of music, 
ranging from gospel to 
pop, which they choose 
through the radio as 
well as from suggestions 
from friends and fans. 



From there they "basi- 
cally do everything by 
ear." Sharp member 
Laurie Goguen joined 
the group because she 
loves to sing and the 
size of the group allows 
her to really get to know 
everyone. This close- 
ness definitely helps 
them to have fun and to 
give their audience the 
great performances they 
have learned to expect. 
pb 




Kevin Keating 

Our own Cousin It performs 
with "The B.C. Family." 



BC Sharps 103 



The Screaming Eagles 




The Screaming Eagles watch the game from the stands. 



Heide Bronke Cheryl Simrany 



The band conductors lead the Screaming Eagles in their halftime 
show. 




The Marching Band performs at a football game. 



Here's Boston College's very own "Golden Girl.' 



104 The Screaming Eagles 




Cheryl Simrany 



lie conductor leads the Band in front of a full audience. 



r 



An Act That's Hard to Miss 



Perhaps the loudest, 
and one of the most 
well-known activities at 
BC is the Screaming 
Eagles Marching Band. 
Although the band is 
known for its halftime 
performances at football 
games, it also performs 
at various events out- 
side of BC, such as the 
Allston-Brighton Pa- 
rade. The Eagles also 



use their talents to 
spread a little cheer by 
performing in many 
retirement homes. The 
band is a diverse and 
talented group. When 
you find them practicing 
at Conte Foriim in the 
pouring rain, you know 
that they are also among 
the hardest working. In 
addition to the musi- 
cians, the band is also 



made up of the 
colorguards and the 
twirlers. Together with 
the various instructors 
and staff, the group 
perfect their music and 
routines to provide us 
with the spirited perfor- 
mances we know so 
well. This year the 
Eagles performed songs 
like "Truly Red, White, 
and Blue" and such 



favorites as "Louie, 
Louie" and "Wooly 
Booly." The Screaming 
Eagles Marching Band is 
a dedicated and commit- 
ted tradition at BC that's 
hard to miss. Whether 
you're in the stadium, or 
clear across campus, 
you're sure to recognize 
them when you hear 
them, md 



The Screaming Eagles 105 



Cheerleaders 




Cheryl Simrany Cheryl Simrany 

Showing her spirit comes naturally to Melissa Fernandez. Joanna Frame goes out of her way to get the crowd going. 




Cheryl Simrany 

The Eagle Cheerleaders: Front Row:: Joanna Frame, Melissa Martin, Amy Brown, Amanda Bishop, Melissa Fernandez, Liz Aquiar, 
Kristen McGee. Back Roio: William Yeung, Bill Pan, Sean Sova, Pete Siletti, Ron Malloy, Paul Bureau, Chad Soares. 

4 



106 Cheerleaders 




..-•4i''*^ 



*. 



:^ 



'.-••-3 




Let's go Eagles! 



Cheryl Simrany Cheryl Simrany 

William Yeung and Joanna Frame get a head start on promoting spirit 
at the Pep Rally at O'Neill. 



Keeping Spirit and Pride Alive 



Seven young women 
hang perilously in 
midair. They are only 
supported by the up- 
^vard, outstretched 
hands of the young men 
standing on the ground. 
Then suddenly, all at 
once, they leap up- 
wards, do a midair split, 
and land trustingly in 
the waiting arms below. 

Most BC students 
would never be able to 
go through with this. 



However, to the 14 
members of this group, 
this is a daily experi- 
ence. It makes them 
some of the most recog- 
nized and most watched 
people on campus. They 
are the Boston College 
Cheerleaders. 

The goal of the cheer- 
leaders, according to 
Chad Soares, a junior on 
the team, is to "get the 
crowd into the game." 
Soares says that al- 



though the performing 
is hard, the toughest 
thing about 

cheerleading is keeping 
the spirit up when the 
crowd is not. 

This is the 27th year of 
coed cheerleading at BC. 
They begin each year by 
attending a cheerleading 
camp with students 
from other schools. This 
year the group were 
awarded a special honor 
by being selected to 



compete in the national 
cheerleading competi- 
tion in Dallas, Texas in 
January. Throughout the 
football and the basket- 
ball seasons, the Cheer- 
leaders, including the 
famous Eagle mascot, 
perform, keeping spirit 
and pride in athletics 
alive. Let's go Eagles! bf 



Cheerleaders 107 



Intramural Sports 




r- ■ ^A^>".;^^^;SSyi^^ 



It may not be a varsity sport, but the competition is fierce all the same. 



PaulJ.Hezel 

Intramural Basketball is usually played at the Flynn Recre- 
ation Complex. 



Paul J. Hezel 




TaulJ. Hezel 

The Intramural Football players hold a conference to plan their next 



moves. 



108 Intramurals 




^^ 



PaulJ.Hezel 

Losing can be disheartening in this Intramural Softball game. 



PaulJ.Hezel 



Two intramural basketball teams square off. 



Fierce and Friendly Competition 



Boston College's 
intramural sports pro- 
gram offers students a 
broad selection of activi- 
ties to quench one's 
athletic thirst and spirit. 
All members of the BC 
community are welcome 
to participate in the 
■^vide range of activities. 
Those who choose to 
step up to the challenge 
face fierce competition 
from their peers. Some 
of the more popular 



choices this year include 
basketball, volleyball, 
Softball, and football. 
Offered through "The 
Plex", the intramural 
sports give students a 
chance to improve their 
skills, keep in shape, 
broaden their interests, 
or just meet others with 
the same interests. So for 
anyone who's interested, 
be ready to face some 
competition, but also 
prepare to have fun. jp 




Paul J. Hezel 

Intramural basketball in the "Plex" brings out the best in 
non-varsity athletes. 



Intramurals 109 



Club Sports 




The Sailing Club often makes use of the Charles River. 



Paul J. Hezel 




PauljTHezt' 



Cycling is one of the clubs on campus that takes you outside the gates and into the world. 





Paul J. Hezel 



PaulJ.Hezei: 



The CycUng Club zips along a road near Boston College. 



The Sailing Club puts smiles on the faces of all its mem- 
bers. 



110 Club Sports 




Paul J. Hezel 



Fencing Club participates in tournaments at the Flynn Recreational Complex. 



Pushing Each Other To Excel 



The Club sports of 
Boston College exist to 
encourage, promote, 
and play sports in 
intercollegiate, non- 
varsity competition. 
Students come together 
to share similar inter- 
ests, and to just have 
fun. There is a great 
\'ariety to choose from. 
For those who are 
drawTi to the water. 
Crew and Sailing serve 
as activities for inter- 



ested parties. If viewing 
nature at either high 
speed or a slow relaxing 
pace sparks an interest. 
Cycling or Skiing may 
be for you. For others 
who prefer a team sport 
or head-to-head compe- 
tition, there's Karate, 
Fencing, Ultimate 
Frisbee, Lacrosse, or 
Rugby. Some clubs are 
recently formed while 
others have been a 
longtime BC tradition. 



The clubs challenge 
other teams in the area 
through regular matches 
and tournaments, estab- 
lishing rivalries with 
teams from Holy Cross, 
Boston University, and 
Harvard, to name just a 
few. A special camara- 
derie forms among the 
members through rigor- 
ous training and prac- 
tice. Led by strong 
leadership from coaches, 
staff, as well as the 



players, the members 
push themselves and 
each other to excel with 
the ultimate hope of 
victory. However, 
regardless of the out- 
come, the Club Sports of 
BC have become well 
established and well- 
known organizations on 
campus, earning respect 
and support from the 
students, staff, and their 
opponents, jp 



Club Sports 111 



Residence Hall Association 




Kevin Keatmg 



The Residence Hall Association: Front Row: Scott VanEerde, Dan McNeal, Mike Gavin, Robyn Nelson. Row 2: Jen 
Cunningham, Shane Walsh, Elizabeth Weiss, John Mancini, Vittorio LaPira, Brian Kelly, Deborah Augustine, Susan Corcoran. 
Row 3: Ann Barley, Tom Renault, Caroline Logan, JuUe Heffernan, Paul Waldron, Sam Poomprakobski, Christian Eidt, 
Stephanie Campbell, Dan Sweeney. 



r A Sense of Community 



Introducing the Resi- 
dence Hall Association's 
fifth year of establish- 
ment was an important 
name change that 
brought with it a greater 
sense of community. 
Formally the Residence 
Hall Council, the new 
arrangement includes 
RHA executive officers, 
hall councils and repre- 
sentatives. For the first 
time, the Senior area 
dorms were also repre- 



sented by their own 
councils. They all fall 
under the leadership of 
President Christian Eidt 
and Vice-President 
Susan Corcoran. 

As the student gov- 
erning body within the 
residence halls, RHA 
takes on the middle-man 
position between resi- 
dent students and the 
Office of the University 
Housing. The hall coun- 
cils, with the help of the 



directors, strive to 
achieve a feeling of 
community among the 
BC residents. Programs 
are designed to get 
students to interact with 
each other, and establish 
a better living and 
learning environment. 
Whether they take on a 
cultural, educational, or 
religious tone, the un- 
derlying theme remains 
community. 

RHA also attempts to 



include other members 
of the BC community 
along with the students, 
such as faculty, adminis- 
tration, and alumni. A 
new program. Breaking 
the Barriers, invited BC 
administrators like 
Father Monan to openly 
discuss campus issues. 
RHA also sponsors a 
variety of events, offer- 
ing everyone a diverse 
number of opportunities 
to get involved, as 



112 Residence Hall Association 



Women's Resource Center 




Heide M, Bronke 

The Women's Resource Center Staff: Kathy Boyle, Tricia Russo, Taren Tavares, Julie O'Rourke, Kim Ciampa, Colleen Dillon. 





Y A Resource For All 




Since the School of 


issues through educa- 


designed to address the 


Arts and Sciences be- 


tional programs and 


current concerns of 


came coed 20 years ago. 


supportive resources. 


Boston College as well 


an increase of women 


Their library contains 


as the broader issues of 


on campus brought 


over 1500 volumes on 


our society while re- 


attention to a new de- 


subjects such as psychol- 


maining neutral to 


mand to focus on the 


ogy, Uterature, health. 


them. The center is 


different experiences. 


and careers, and is 


available for everyone. 


needs, and interests of 


available for reference. 


both men and women. 


women. The Women's 


paper writing, or just 


students and faculty 


Resource Center was 


general interest. Pro- 


ahke. It offers a comfort- 


foxmded in 1975 to do 


grams include films. 


able atmosphere in 


just this. The WRC is 


lectures, and the 


which to seek informa- 


committed to examining 


women's Health Fair, to 


tion, and to meet others 


and furthering women's 


name a few. They are 


and relax, as 



Women's Resource Center 113 



Service 



j 1 










I [eide M. Bronke 



Joanna Aror 



The Big Brother/ Big Sister and The Best Buddies programs 
get together for a Christmas party. 



The officers of the Gold Key Society stand behind their motto of "Servici 
and Sacrifice." 





Giving of Themselves to Serve Others 




A special aspect of 
Boston College is its 
strong emphasis on 


and Jamaica Pilgrim- 
ages. 

The Salt and Light 


Lazarus House, a home- 
less ministry, and the 
Freshmen Retreat. 


and films concerning 
this pressing issue. 
The Ecuador and the 


service to others. Pro- 


Company of BC is a 


The BC World Hun- 


Jamaica Pilgrimages 


viding strong support 
for this goal of service is 
the University Chap- 


group that designs and 
runs religious retreats 
for the BC community 


ger Committee is a 
group that works to- 
wards educating the 


provide volunteers the 
opportunity to give of 
themselves to the less 


laincy, which oversees 


as well as for local 


community about the 


fortunate of other coun- 


many programs. Some 


senior citizens and 


world hunger crisis and 


tries. 


of these programs in- 


junior high and high 


toward bringing about 


Another organization 


clude The Salt and Light 


school students. These 


awareness through 


on campus that allows 


Company, The BC 
World Hunger Commit- 


retreats provide a time 
for prayer and service. 


various actions. In 
addition to the Oxfam 


the BC community to be 
a part of this giving is 


tee, The Coalition for 
Peace, and the Ecuador 


They include Bethany 
Weekend held at 


Fast, the group also 
sponsors guest speakers 


The Gold Key Society, 
which stresses the im- 



114 Service 



Greg Zlevor 

The Salt and Light retreat participants are never short on 

creativit\'. 



After the fun and games he's all partied out. 



portance of service as 
well as friendship 
tlirough its various 
acti\dties. 

The Big Brother/Big 
Sister and the Best 
Buddies programs 
reach out to the under- 
privileged and the 
disabled children of the 
Boston area. The pro- 
grams provide role 
models for the children 
and allow them to 
develop special friend- 
ships with BC students. 
pb 




^ 



^ 



% 




HeideM, ISronU- 







Ob. 



f 



4 



/ 



4 



Santa makes a special \isit for the kids. 



Heide M. Bronke 



Service 115 



Service 



r 




A little cold weather doesn't stop The Salt and Light Company from doing their work. 



Greg Zlevo; 



At a Salt and Light retreat, behind these 
strange activities is always a message. 




Greg Zlevor 



116 Service 




Brad Roe takes time to play with the kids of Ehiran while on a University Chaplaincy trip to Ecuador. 



Heide M, Bronke 



Service 117 



O'Connell House 







Tina Ting 



The 0*Connell House Staff: Don Reed, Michael Quagge, Louise Terciak, Kimberly Pavlak, Alicia Farrell. 




At the Center of Activities 



At the center of activ- 
ity on Upper Campus is 
O'Connell House. Do- 
nated to Boston College 
by Cardinal O'Connell 
in 1937, the house was 
turned into a student 
union in 1972 and re- 
mains that way today. 

O'Connell House is 
staffed by undergradu- 
ate students who are 
under the supervision of 
the Office of the Dean of 
Student Development. 



Together with UGBC, 
the staff plans the pro- 
grams and special 
events that take place in 
the House. 

During the week 
O'Connell House func- 
tions as a study lounge, 
a place for student 
organizations to meet, 
and a spot for lectures, 
films and dramatic 
readings. There is also a 
grand piano, pool table, 
television and VCR for 



student use and recre- 
ation. 

On the weekends the 
House is reserved for 
programming by the 
staff to provide on- 
campus entertainment 
for students. The larger 
events held here include 
the Breaking the Barriers 
Ball, Harvest Night, and 
the popular Middle 
March Ball. O'Connell 
House also co-sponsors 
events with other stu- 



dent organizations that 
perform here, such as 
The Bostonians and My 
Mother's Fleabag. 

O'Connell House is 
open to all students and 
has much to offer. Staff 
member Alicia Farrell 
said of the House that 
"it's not used as much as 
it should be" but it is 
"one of the few tradi- 
tions on campus." as 



118 O'Connell House 




Murray House 



Chor\'l Simmnv 



The Murray House, a home away from home. 



4 B ■ S \ S ■' ■ ■'■-»•■ 



■ « * 




The Murray House Staff: Jill McKeen, Juhe McHardy, Jen Pompeo, Dawn Pighetti, Ray Hilbert, Tony Pulsone. 



Cheryl Simrany 



Y I he Door 


h Always Open! 


This year, Murray- 


connected to the cam- 


their facilities. This in- 


House has decided to 


pus. Commuters can 


cludes a fully equipped 


take on a new approach 


come in to study, take a 


kitchen, television 


towards the Boston 


break in between 


lounges, computers, type- 


College commuiuty. The 


classes, or to just relax. 


writers, and quiet study 


three story Tudor house 


The house sponsors 


areas. Space can also be 


located on Hammond 


various events such as 


reserved for meetings and 


Street has been polished 


Cultural Awareness 


functions, so feel free to 


up and renovated. 


Night and the tradi- 


stop by-the door is always 


Murray House still 


tional spaghetti dinners. 


open! as 


remains the campus 


Murray House also 




commuter center, offer- 


welcomes both faculty 




ing non-resident stu- 


and resident students to 




dents a place to "hang 


participate in the events. 




out" and feel more 


and to take advantage of 





Murray House 119 





Christine Cerrato 



SPAC Staff: Pokey Chatham, Lou Kodumal, Jim Scamby, Katie Hung. 



r Promoting leadership Within BC 




Got a new idea for a 


maintains a library 


campus activities, SPAC 


volved are the 


club, or just want to get 


which contains ideas 


maintains interest files 


Roundtable Discussions 


involved in one but 


and information for all 


referring enthusiastic 


and the Babst Library 


don't know where to 


students to use. The staff 


students to appropriate 


Speak-Out Series which 


begin? SPAC is your 


keeps student leaders 


clubs and organizations. 


allows faculty and 


answer. The Student 


up to date through the 


Beyond these behind- 


students a chance to 


Program and Activities 


BC Student Leader 


the-scene activities. 


interact and to voice 


Center serves as a liason 


Newsletter and the 


SPAC also sponsors 


their opinions. 


between the Office of 


University Program- 


such events as the popu- 


In providing such 


the Dean of Student 


ming Board Calendar. 


lar "Thursday Night at 


services and events. 


Development and stu- 


SPAC also assists stu- 


the Cafe" which pro- 


SPAC continues to 


dent organizations. 


dents in developing and 


vides various groups a 


promote leadership and 


They assist clubs in 


registering new clubs. 


chance to show off their 


organizational develop- 


programming events 


For those who want to 


talents. Other activities 


ment within the BC 


and raising funds. It 


become involved in 


in which SPAC is in- 


community, ph 



120 SPAC 



AHANA 




Kevin Keating 

rhe AHANA Staff: Front Rozo: Hans Bastien, Akiko Minami, Philip Eng, Sabe Johnson, Sandra Jean-Louis, Shirley Valerie, Erica 
^err\-, Jackqueline McLean. Row 2: Bonnie Chan, Ian Kane, Duane Lee, Jae Lee, Paul Pak, Danette Thomas, Antoinette Herelle, 
Eunhee Chov, Stacev Murray. 



f" Creating Multicultural Awareness 


AHANA is an acro- 


clubs as part of the 


Through education of 


nym for African Ameri- 


AHANA caucus. The 


the school, they work to 


can, Hispanic, Asian, 


caucus works to pro- 


promote the awareness 


and Native American. 


mote diversity and 


of the various cultures 


Boston College was one 


maintain a non-racial. 


and emphasize the 


of the first universities 


socially accepted envi- 


importance and unique- 


to use this acronym to 


rormnent for all cultures 


ness of each. AHANA's 


replace the term "minor- 


of the BC community. 


main goals are to make 


ity." Today, AHANA is 


Vice-President 


BC a campus that does 


gaining widespread 


Jackqueline McLean and 


not condone discrimina- 


popularity among other 


Director Danette Tho- 


tion and to inspire 


schools. AHANA repre- 


mas work with UGBC 


students to take pride in 


sents the various ethnic 


and act as liaisons be- 


their heritage, al 


groups of Boston Col- 


tween UGBC and the 




lege. It encompasses 15 


AHANA community. 





AHANA 121 



International Clubs 



The German Club: Professor 
Mengalis, Antonia Hipp, 
David Parsons, Stephanie 
Gottwald, Meghan Barnes, 
Christopher Doroszczyk, 
Donna Carr, Chris Lynch. 




All nationalities are invited to join any of the International Clubs 



oanna Arongj 

The International Cafe Nights are a source of fun for all who come. 



122 International Clubs 




IcMiinaArong Joanna Arong 

Dome people really enjoy the International Cafe Nights! The Italian Club: Michael Maniscalo, Kathy Sammataro, Diana 

Ermini. 



Enriching BC's Diversity 



There are a number of 
cultural clubs that exist 
at Boston College, yet 
they all share a common 
goal. Each strives to 
enrich the BC commu- 
nity and contribute to its 
diversity. Some of these 
clubs include the Italian 
Club, the Chinese Stu- 
dent Association, The 
Irish Society, and the 
Organization of Latin 
America Affairs. 

Each organization 



celebrates its culture, 
language, and traditions 
throughout the year by 
hosting social and edu- 
cational programs, such 
as ethnic dinners, guest 
speakers, movies, and 
socials. Many clubs also 
collaborate together to 
organize larger events. 
Culture Night, for 
example, is given by the 
various Asian clubs in 
conjunction with the 
Asian Caucus. These 



international clubs also 
participate with similar 
clubs at other universi- 
ties in organizing and 
hosting events. 

Although these clubs 
are geared towards 
specific cultures, all are 
encouraged to join and 
participate in the events. 
They encourage stu- 
dents to take pride in 
their heritage as well as 
to learn about others, pb 



International Clubs 123 



Specific Issues 



A member recruits help for The Coalition for Peace. 




Cheryl Simrany 




Heide M. Bronke 



The Appalachia Volunteers organize a trip. 




Bringing About A Positive Change 



There are many 
organizations at Boston 
College whose goal is to 
make the BC commu- 
nity more aware of the 
pressing issues sur- 
rounding us. These 
varying issues may be 
political, economic, or 
social in nature and call 
for varying actions. 
However, members of 
each group share a 
dedication and enthusi- 
asm for their cause with 



the hope of bringing 
about a positive change. 
Some of these groups 
include An\nesty Inter- 
national, the Environ- 
mental Action Center, 
T.R.E.E, and The Appa- 
lachia Volunteers. 

Amnesty Interna- 
tional is a worldwide 
organization that works 
for human rights. The 
group fights for people 
unfairly imprisoned for 
their beliefs. This year. 



the BC chapter concen- 
trated on women's 
issues. Their main 
activity was writing 
letters to various gov- 
ernments with the hope 
of appealing to them. 
Joanna Arong, the vice- 
president, has been with 
the group since her 
freshmen year. She 
sums up her active 
involvement with the 
club by saying "it's a 
good cause." 



Another good cause 
concerns the environ- 
ment in which we live. 
The Environmental 
Action Center concen- 
trates on these concerns 
that we have ignored for 
so many years and are 
now forced to face. 

The Center, founded 
about eight years ago, is 
a chapter of S.E.A.C. 
(The Student Environ- 
mental Action Coali- 
tion). Their activities 



« 



124 Specific Issues 




^ 




Heide M. Bronke 

\n AmnesU' International Volunteer writes a letter on the behalf 



Joanna Arong 



Df the oppressed. 



T.R.E.E. volunteers coordinate the campus recycling effort. 



consist mostly of letter 
WTiting and petitioning. 
One of their biggest 
projects is the organiza- 
tion of Earth Week. The 
club even received some 
press when they were 
pictured in USA Today 
in October for their 
efforts in the beach 

(clean-up. 
Cleaning up is also 
' the motto for T.R.E.E., 
the recycling program at 
t BC. The program was 



started by students, but 
now the administration 
is also taking part. The 
main focus of the pro- 
gram is to get all of the 
dorms to recycle by 
providing them with 
recycling bins. In addi- 
tion to recychng paper, 
the program hopes to 
eventually add newspa- 
per and cans to its Hst. 

According to Co- 
Director Julie Twomey, 
members of T.R.E.E. 



hope to start the pro- 
grams but eventually 
have the administration 
take over. This allows 
them to initiate more 
programs. Julie says that 
the best thing about the 
club is that "students 
can make a difference", 
and she's definitely 
right, dd 



Specific Issues 125 



In Closing... 



A popular way of advertising upcoming events, these 
sheets have become a familiar sight on campus. 




Joanna Arong 




The Dustbowl is a sight to see on Activities Day, when over 100 clubs recruit for members. 



"Whatever the reason, 

they come together. 

Whenever the season, 

they share agoaC 

to make a difference 

great or small. 

They give of themselves 

each his or her ozon ivay 

to each other, to others 

they live for the day. 

They share a spirit, 

to laugh and to play. 

Though all are different 

they come as one, 

and the seasons change, 

yet their friendship remains. 



pS 



Alexandra Gianinno 




Greg Zlevor 



The Salt and Light Company celebrates mass. 



126 Closing 




Alexandra Gianinno 



What should I sign up for? Students always find that the number and variety of organizations available is overwhelming 

when thev all come together on Activities Day. 




Chervl Simranv 



Heide M. Bronke 



The Eagle, with the help of BC cheerleaders, keeps spirit alive Colleen Dillon of the Women's Resource Center is kept 
during footbaU games. busy during office hours. 



Closing 127 




12,8 Student Life 



STUDENT LIFE 




^university should be a place 
of light, of liberty, and of 
learning. 

r- Benjamin Disraeli 



Student Life 129 



TAILGATING 



Right: We're the fifth string 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Below: Wendy Madigan, "Break- 
fast is ready." 

Photo by: Heide M. Bronke 





Above: Aren't I lucky? 

Photo by: Tina Ting 

Right: The mods: A favorite place to tailgate 

photo by: Tina Ting 



130 Tailgating 



Below: Tailgaters take over B.C. 

Photo bv: Cherv'l Simmnv 




Below: Shelly McPhee, Laura Daniel and Nancy MacElhiney show their 
spirit 

Photi 



Photo by: Tina Ting 






The Sport of all Sports 



Wait! Don't hit that 
snooze button today. 
No, it is not because you 
will be late for a class or 
miss a test, but there is 
an important event tak- 
ing place today . . . Tail- 
gating. As the football 
players get suited up for 
the game, the spectators 
are also preparing in 
their own way. 
Students, parents and 
alumni bring the football 
spirit beyond the 



stadium. The fans are 
getting ready to watch 
an incredible football 
game and cheer Boston 
College on to victory. 
People travel by T, car 
and foot to socialize with 
friends, eat, drink and 
be merry. Just before the 
game begins, the tail- 
gaters take the stadium 
by force to support our 
team. After the game, 
tailgating enthusiastic- 
ally resumes. Win or 



lose, the spirit of tailgat- 
ing is apparent. One 
senior was even heard 
saying "win or lose we 
booze," but in fact the 
sights of tailgating go 
beyond this. The pre- 
parations, cheers, ban- 
ners and participation 
prove tailgating to be the 
sport to support all 
sports. 

— Beth Ahmuty 



Tailgating 131 



TAILGATING 




Above: Kristen Kreuder and John Lavagnino enjoy the day 

Photo by: Tina Ting 

Right: Follow the magic road 

Photo by: Tina Ting 



132 Tailgating 



Below: This is no tea party 

Photo by: Tina Ting 

Right: Guess which team we want to win 

Photo bv: Chen'l Simranv 




Above: A barrel of brew 

Photo by: ChCTyl Simrany 



Tailgating 133 



HEAD OF THE CHARLES 



Left: Preparing for the big event 

Photo by Tina Ting 








Above: B.C. crew member watches the competition 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Right: Crew members stroke to win 

Photo by: Cherv! Simrany 



134 Head of the Charles 



f ;~fc ;'■ - 




■ -%t^f: *^^^.--Saf-. 




- '' .,■♦>• 


4 w 




r. ^ ,^^ jM-^ \^^^_^ j^ 






^^^^^^^^^^^^H^P^^^^^^^r^^ii^^S^H 









Below: A sculler in action 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 



Left: A coxsin feels the effects of a 
crab 

I'hoto by: Cheryl Simrany 

Below; The means to win 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 



^ M 






Stroke 2,3,4 



Sunny, clear and brisk 
are perfect descriptions 
of Sunday, October 20, 
the day of the 27th Head 
of the Charles Regatta. 
1964 marked the first an- 
nual race which set off a 
long-lasting Bostonian 
tradition. 

The Regatta attracts 
rowers from all over the 
world in hopes of win- 
ning this renowned race. 
Participating in the race 
this year were rowers 



from as far away as 
Europe and as close as 
Cambridge, MA all full 
of energy, with the aspi- 
ration to win. 

Among the thousands 
of spectators, a good 
number of Boston Col- 
lege students can always 
be spotted. This year an 
added incentive for 
B.C.ers to leave their 
familiar hunting ground 
of Chestnut Hill and 
head out to Cambridge 



to enjoy the day was the 
preserved two boats 
from the B.C. crew team 
entered in the race. The 
enthusiasm, of the B.C. 
teams were evident in 
the outcome of the Re- 
gatta. The men's four- 
boat came in 32nd out of 
45 teams and the 
women's eight-boat 
rowed past 22 boats to 

finish sixth. 

— Kathleen M. Haley 



Head of the Charles 135 



SPIRIT 



Below: Cheers resound for the B.C. 
flag 

Photo by: Heide M. Bronke 

Right: 'Tor Boston, For Boston, we 
sing our proud refrain!" 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 




Left: He went that way 

Photo by; Cheryl Simrany 

Above: WE ARE . . . B.C.!! 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 



136 Spirit 



low: The B.C. Eagle has every- 
ing under control 

)to Dv: Heide M. Bronke 





Left: "For here all are one and our 
hearts are true . . ." 

Photo by: Hcide M. Bronku 

Below: Take that! 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 





We've got it 



One aspect of Boston 
College student life that 
is sure to survive is 
spirit. The pride that 
students and faculty 
have in their school is 
strong, determined and 
very difficult to ignore. 
During football season, 
cheers of support echo 
from alumni stadium, 
while Conte Forum is 
often shaken by dedicat- 
ed fans throughout 
hockey and basketball 



seasons. 

Students and faculty 
make up only a portion 
of the enthusiastic fans. 
Traditionally BC alumni 
return to their cherished 
alma mater in order to 
cheer for its triumph, 
their shots often outvoic- 
ing those of the stu- 
dents. No matter what 
event, sport or club is in 
the spotlight, the spirit 
to succeed is always 
there. 



BC's motto, "Ever to 
Excel" is embraced by 
every member of the 
Boston College com- 
munity. Whether partic- 
ipant or observer, 
everyone approaches 
the school's events with 
the hope of success, the 
determination to excel 
and the pride of keeping 
the Eagle spirit alive. 

— David Shapiro 



Spirit 137 



SPIRITUAL LIFE 



Right: The Jesuit tradition con 
tinues 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 




138 Spiritual Life 




The Spirit is moving all over B.C. 



It's Sunday, do you 
know where your room- 
mate is? A pretty good 
guess would be that he or 
she is at mass. The Jesuit 
tradition upon which Bos- 
ton College was founded is 
still alive and kicking. 
Mass is offered daily and 
almost every hour on Sun- 
days. Some popular 
masses among juniors and 
seniors are the 9:30 pm in 
St. Ignatius' basement and 
10:00 pm in Edmonds Hall. 



Students stroll into the 
crowded lounge for the 
service which almost al- 
ways promises to have a 
short sermon — a must 
when you've left all your 
homework for Sunday 
night. 

Last year, in celebration 
of the 450th Ignatian anni- 
versary, B.C. held a mass 
of the Holy Spirt on 
O'Neill plaza. This mass 
was repeated this year due 
to its popularity among the 



students, faculty and ad- 
ministration. J. Donald 
Monan, S.J., president of 
B.C., presided over the 
mass with the help of 
William Neenan, S.J. and 
Charles Allen, S.J. The 
B.C. Chorale was also pre- 
sent to add to the cele- 
bration. The enthusiasm of 
those who attended the 
mass is just one example of 
the zealous spiritual life at 
Boston College. 

— Kathleen M. Haley 



Spiritual Life 139 



CAMPUS 



Right: Eating in the Dustbowl 

Photo by: Heide M. Bronke 

Below: The shoe tree: A legend of its -I 
own 

Photo bv: Heide M. Bronke 




Above: The quad is a frequent meeting place 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Right: The flower man — a familiar face in the dustbowl 

Photo by: Joanna Arong 



140 Campus 




Left: Walking the road to education 

Photo by: Cber\'l Simrnny 

Below: The infamous Higgins stairs 

Photo by; Hfkle M. Bronke 

Bottom Left: Hanging out in the Quad 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 





Above: Enjoying the day 

Photo bv: Chervl Simranv 



Tradition and Change 



"And this known as 
the Quad, over there is 
Fulton Hall, and behind 
us is Gasson." The tours 
of Boston College cap- 
ture the beauty of the 
campus. 

Visitors and prospec- 
tive students come from 
all over to see the B.C. 
community. For many, 
the campus is a major 
factor in their decision to 
come to B.C. Once you 
are here, you can enjoy 



hanging out on the Dust- 
bowl, the view from 
McGuinn, or the lawns 
atBapst. Older buildings 
mixed with new ones tie 
together tradition with 
the changing times. It is 
also a reflection of the 
diversity of the B.C. 
community. 

A recent addition to 
Boston College is the 
four story Chemistry 
building with a central 
atrium. Campion Hall 



was renovated and ex- 
panded to facilitate the 
learning process. Fortu- 
nately, the scaffolding 
seen in various places is 
only temporary, and will 
eventually improve the 
campus so future 
students will be able to 
enjoy it for many years 
to come. 

— Beth Ahmuty and 
Kathleen Haley 



Campus 141 



CAMPUS 



Below: The Dustbowl is a favorite place to pass time 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Right: Posing for the camera 

Photo by; Cheryl Sunrany 






Above: Another false alarm 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Right: Finishing touches to the 
Chemistry building 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 




142 Campus 



KURT VONNEGUT, JR 




Vonnegut tells it like it is. 

Photo by: Heide M. Bronke 



// 



How To Get A Job 
Like Mine" 



Towards the end of 
November, Kurt Vonne- 
gut, Jr. came to BC and 
gave a wonderfully 
memorable lecture en- 
titled "How To Get A Job 
Like Mine," the title of 
any lecture he has given. 
Over six hundred stu- 
dents crammed into the 
Rat to hear this re- 
nowned author of best- 



sellers such as Slaughter 
House Five talk about 
topics ranging from the 
Gulf War to writing. 
Vonnegut started off 
encouraging students to 
"be saints in an indecent 
society." He also spoke 
about how far out nation 
has come in overcoming 
racism since his day and 
how liberty is only just 



starting to be born with- 
in the United States as 
we slowly work toward 
the elimination of preju- 
dice. One message he 
left with the assembled 
students was to go out 
and experience life, to 
not let it pass you by, 
"For God's sake, fart 
around!" 

— James J. Conner 



UGBC Presents. 



143 



UGBC PRESENTS . . . 







nC\r^ N16HT 

/ V-/5 at the 

11/7 





Top: An infamous Dustbowl information sheet Top Left: Here's to the^ 
Above: Let's groove Left: The other electric slide. 

Photos by: Heide M- Bronke 



144 UGBC Presents. 



ow: The fun just begins at Sunset. 

bv: Heide M. Bronke 



Below: Just a beer ... or two ... or three. 

Photo bv: Chen-l Simr.my 

Middle: Last Call plays at Great Scott. 

rhoto bv: Hcidf M. Bronki' 



f»»rs?t 




)ve: Screaming Eagles! 

b\-. Cheryl Simisjiy 

It: The first of many night spots. 

bv: Heide M- Bronke 



Bars 145 



BEYOND BC 



Right: A favorite place for a study 
break. 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 




Above: Avoiding the lines at MA'-, 

Photo by; Heide Bronke 



146 Beyond BC 



Below: Are you on the wall of shame? 



low: Pizza — the old stand-by 

'to bv: Heiiie Bronke 

ittom Left: Party with popcorn 
d beer 

'to bv Heide Bronke 



low: Are you 

il» bv: 1 li'ido Bronko 



Bottom Right; It's time to eat the donuts 

I'hoto bv: Hi'ido Broilki- 





The Essentials 



When you've studied 
until your brain is sore 
(or when you're looking 
for something to distract 
you from studying), 
there's always the 
Circle. You'll have 
plenty of time to make 
new friends as you wait 
in line at MaryAnn's or 
Cityside. If you get tired 



of waiting, you can al- 
ways satisfy the late- 
night munchies with 
some Munchkins from 
Dunkin' Donuts, a slice 
of Sicilian at Presto's or 
Fruit Loops from 
Christy's. The Ground 
Round is an option for 
anyone who can appre- 
ciate a good hamburger. 



free popcorn, and Betty 

Boop film clips. With 

Cleveland Circle at one 

end of the B.C. bus 

route, Boston College 

students have perfected 

the art of the study 

break. 

— Bridget Barry 



Beyond BC 147 



CAMPUS FOOD 




Top Left: Egg McBC? 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Above: Buying some sweet treats 

Photo by: Joanna Arong 



Top Right: Kristen Walz at the salad bar 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Above: The meal plan in action 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany & Alexandra Gianinno 



I 



148 Campus Food 



'bing it on Upper Campus 

I'hiitii by: Sui' Brnwn 

Below: The ritzy place on campus — 
The Goldern Lantern 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany & Alexandra Cianinno 




Food for Thought 



I 

I 



fe 



Hearing your stomach 
growl in the middle of 
class can be pretty em- 
barrassing. Fortunately, 
you are not far from 
food. Although there 
may be some waiting in- 
volved, eventually you 
will be able to decide 
upon the meal of your 
dreams. 

If fast food is your 
thing, try the new "Rat" 
which serves breakfast 
and lunch in the true 



McDonald's fashion. If 
you're looking for some- 
thing a little more high 
class, try the Golden 
Lantern, a place to sat- 
isfy your seafood, Italian 
or steak cravings. Or 
maybe the munchies 
have struck, and McEl- 
roy, the main dining hall 
on Middle Campus, is 
closed. Then where do 
you go? To Stuart Dining 
Hall on Newton Campus 
(to satisfy your late night 



pizza craving) or The 
Club on Upper Campus 
(for nachos and ice 
cream of course). 

So whether you are in- 
dulging merely to quiet 
your stomach, or if food 
is simply your social 
medium, it is evident 
from the varieties of food 
offered at B.C. that eat- 
ing is a large part of col- 
lege life. 

— Beth Ahmuty 



Campus Food 149 



DORM LIFE 



Right: Home Sweet Home on Upper Campus 

Photo by: Sue Brown 

Below: Making a meal in Hillsides 

Photo by; Joanna Arong 




Above: Have a Coke and a Smile 

Photo by: Joanna Arong 

BUght: You can only go down from here 



Photo by: Sue Brown 



150 Dorm Life 





•"■■BMMd k^^ 



I 



iS 



t 



edmo*^dis hall 




D 




I 





Left: Home of the massacre scare 

Photo by: Heidc Bronkc 



Homes away from home 



The rumor spread through 
the campus like wildfire — on 
Halloween eve, a mass mur- 
der was going to take place in 
a "T" shaped dormitory over- 
looking a reservoir. Many BC 
students immediately as- 
sumed that Edmonds Hall, 
which fits this description, 
would be the sight of the slay- 
ings. 

While this is a highly dram- 
atized occurrence, there are 
many other frightening sce- 
narios which students have to 



contend with when living in a 
dormitory at Boston College. 
First, innumerable false fire 
alarms occur at all hours of 
the day and night, rousing 
sleepy students who must 
then spend up to an hour 
standing in the cold. Especial- 
ly famous for pulled alarms is 
Walsh Hall, which has been 
known to have more than 
three alarms in only one day. 
Yet fire alarms are not the 
only causes of sleepless 
nights. Noisy roommates or 



neighbors have been known 
to disrupt many a deep slum- 
ber as well. 

Despite these inconven- 
iences, the dorm is stiU the 
place we call home for nine 
months out of the year, and it 
is also a place where friends 
are made to last — often 
beyond the four years here at 
BC. Without dorms, college 
life just wouldn't be the same. 
— Kathleen Haley 



Dorm Life 151 



LASELL 




Above: The new BC dorm 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Right: The dreaded destination 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 



ritfte^i^lBfe; 



,;'^?^<^-~ 



152 LaseU 




Below: Home to 76 freshman 

Photo by: Hcido Bronkc 

Right: Two of the chosen ones 

Photo bv Heidc Bronke 



'Hn^Kif 





t <« 



ii.-^ 






X 




- '^iXn' 



No Room at the Inn 



Fitzpatick, Keyes 
North, Claver Hall, 
Gushing, and McClel- 
land Hall . . . Which one 
doesn't belong? Out of 
about 2300 freshman at 
Boston College this year, 
76 have been singled out 
and were placed to live 
in McClelland Hall at 
Lasell Junior College in 
Newton. Since the Uni- 



underestimated the 
number of incoming 
freshman, the majority 
of this year's frosh live 
with three people in 
rooms meant for two. 
Despite this attempt by 
the Housing Office to 
rectify the situation, 
there still wasn't enough 
room for all freshman. 
This lack of space at B.C. 



led to the University's 

renting of McClelland 

Hall from Lasell and the 

placing of the 46 females 

and 30 males there. In 

order to accommodate 

these students, B.C. has 

provided a shuttle bus 

that runs between Lasell 

and B.C. throughout the 

day. 

— Kathleen Haley 



Lasell 153 



HOMECOMING 




154 Homecoming 





A Night to Remember 



Homecoming week- 
end: a weekend of foot- 
ball, spirit and of course, 
anticipation for the an- 
nual UGBC Homecom- 
ing Ball, held this year 
on November 1. Style 
and class were on hand 
for all, as many atten- 
dees donned elegant 
attire and traveled via 
Limousine to the site of 
this year's event, the 
Boston Sheraton Hotel, 



for a night of dancing, 
friends, and memories. 
The night commenced 
with small private par- 
ties and grew with hun- 
dreds of couples "seiz- 
ing" the night, dancing 
to the jazzy melodies of 
Mark Morris and the Cat 
Tunes. The affair con- 
tinued to the wee hours 
of morning, with most 
groups returning to their 
own small parties for 



continued celebration. 

The spirit of celebra- 
tion lasted through the 
following day with the 
BC Eagles' triumphant 
win over Pittsburgh, as 
well as the popular 
second annual Home- 
coming Brunch. Spirit, 
celebration, parties and 
the football game all con- 
tributed to a weekend to 

be remembered always. 
— David Shapiro 



Homecoming 155 



A TYPICAL BC DAY 




Top Left: Getting a dean bill of 
health 

Photo by: Sue Brown 

Above; Can we help you? 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 



Right: The dreaded task of laundry 

Photo bv; Kevin Keating 



156 A Typical BC Day 



Top Right: The money machine 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Above: The friendly grocers 

photo by: Cheryl Simrany & Alexandra Gianin 




Left: Do you view at U-View? 

Photo by: Alexandra Gianinno 




Where have you been today? 



You're finished with 
classes for the day, but 
before you go home to 
take your nap and watch 
"Oprah", don't forget to 
do your errands. Stop at 
the post office to mail 
your letter home asking 
for money, then go the 
the Baybank machine to 
withdraw what little 
funds still remain. Take 
your cash to Mattie's to 
buy bread, milk and 



laundry detergent (you 
used up your room- 
mate's Tide yesterday) 
so that you can do that 
crucial load of laundry: 
the one inspired by your 
realization that you're 
out of clean underwear. 
Check the U-View to get 
your registration infor- 
mation and to make sure 
you'll be able to locate 
your advisor for that pre- 
cious signature. One last 



stop: the infirmary, 
where your stuffy nose 
and sore throat will be 
assuaged with sixteen 
small white packages of 
Sudafed. All finished? 
Then hurry home, be- 
fore your roommates 
claim the TV to watch 
their tape of "Better Off 
Dead" for the fortieth 

time. 

— Bridget Barry 



A Typical BC Day 157 



THE PLEX 




Top Left: No problem 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Above: Working the Stairmaster 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 



Above: A slow day at the pool 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Top Right: Squash anyone? 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 



158 ThePlex 




Left: Jimmy the gate keeper 

I'hoto by: Hi-idt' IJronko 

Below: Trapped in the cage 

I'holo by: lli'iilo Drimkf 




> 




Feels so good 



The Flynn Recreation- 
al Sports Complex, bet- 
ter known as the Plex, is 
used as an exercise facili- 
ty, a place to take a study 
break and a social meet- 
ing place. From early 
dawn to late at night, the 
Plex is always bustling 
with activity. It is 
equipped with weights, 
a track, stationary bikes. 



Stairmasters, two pools, 
and various courts (such 
as basketball, volleyball, 
handball and squash). 
Aerobic classes, offered 
between three to five 
times daily, are one of 
the more popular attrac- 
tions at the Plex. All of 
this is available at stu- 
dents' fingertips for a 
small mandatory fee at 



the beginning of each 
year. 

This year, students are 
motivated to go to the 
Plex not only for a 
workout, but also to 
relax in the newly in- 
stalled whirlpool. Fun 
and fitness — what more 
could the Plex have to 

offer. 

— Beth Ahmuty 



The Plex 159 



PEP RALLIES 



Right: A note of support 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Below: The Eagle goes for the tackle 

Photo by; Cheryl Simrany 




Left: Fr. Monan lets loose 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 

Above: The B.C. Eagles have the crowd's support 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 



160 Pep Rallies 



Below: The power is in the Proof 

Photo by; Chcn'l Sinir.iny 




Days of Support 



The cheers resounded 
from O'Neill plaza while 
students vied for free hot 
dogs, danced or just sat 
and enjoyed the views. 
This was the scene of the 
first Pep Rally at Boston 
College. Friday, Septem- 
ber 6, 1991 marked the 
day when the Boston 
College band. Living 
Proof, the cheerleaders, 
the Eagle and Fr. Monan 
(to name only a few) 
were present to cheer on 
the honored guests of 



the day — the Boston 
College Football team. 
The Pep Rally brought 
the students together to 
show enthusiasm for the 
team at the beginning of 
one of the toughest foot- 
ball schedules in the 
country. The first Pep 
Rally was such a success 
that the tradition con- 
tinued when the football 
team had to face the 
number one team, 
Miami, at their last home 
game. The scene was 



slightly different on Fri- 
day, November 22 as 
lights illuminated on 
O'Neill plaza in an 
attempt to dispel the 
dark and the rain. 
Nevertheless, a crowd 
appeared to support the 
Eagles. The Pep Rallies 
helped to rouse the en- 
thusiasm of the fans at 
BC and showed the 
Eagles that they had a 
following for whom they 

should fight to win. 

— Kathleen Haley 



Pep Rallies 161 



BC T-SHIRTS 



Right: A typical wardrobe 

Photo by: Alexandra Gianinno & Betsy Nyman 

Below: The CSOM motto 

Photo by: Betsy Nyman 








THE ORIGINAL 
TOP 10 LIES 

1. Yeah, I know Doug- 

2. The Mods are coming down next year 

3. S/lvio Conte is an Irishman 

4 / go to the pjex to vvorK out 

3. Cohabitation policies are em 

6. There are no ^° „ ^ntorced. 

°'-' '®" t a lOke. 
8- A(f our blonds are real. 
■ ' ve been to class every day this week 

'O. Greaf ria*;.^~ 



70. Greaf dating scene. 






.S«Sf" 



-i-saaR?^^- . J 



/ 




Above: Have you heard these? 

Photo by: Alexandra Gianinno & Betsy Nyman 




162 BC Tees 




^Ca 



IF} 



^ HOCKEY 



1^ 



^AQtEs 



y 



'ERS 



Left: The championship round 

Photo by: Alox.indr.i Gianinno ili Bi'tsv NyiU'in 

Below: Cherish the memories 

Photo by: Ki'vin Kcatinf- 








■.'rB0K>S*?S(?3Sr. 






TAPPA KEGGA i^^' 



x)ve: EC's Greek system 

toby: Tina Ting 



Favorite fashions 



On any given day 
walking across campus it 
is inevitable that you will 
see numerous people 
wearing Boston College 
T-shirts. BC tees are a 
favorite choice of attire 
for both males and fe- 
males. They differ in ex- 
tremes from the tradi- 
tional tees with Boston 
College written across 
the chest which can be 
bought in the BC Book- 
store to the tees which 



can only be bought if 
you're lucky enough to 
have someone come to 
your dorm selling them. 
These tees cover topics 
from the drinking cus- 
toms of BC students to 
the typical events which 
occur on campus. 
Although there are no 
fraternities at BC, there 
is a T-shirt which adver- 
tises the "Tappa Kegga 
Dei" fraternity. The 
"Top Ten Lies of Boston 



College" tee can be seen 

on at least one person a 

day and graces Doug 

Flutie with the #1 spot: 

"Yeah, I know Doug." 

BC tees are just another 

way students have of 

showing pride in their 

school. 

— Kathleen Haley 



BC Tees 163 



TRANSPORTATION 





F. 



'^ 



^ 



1 

1 



Right: An all-too-familiar sign 

photo bv: Chervt Simranv 




Above: The fast T downtown 

Photo by: Heide Bronke 



164 Transportation 




Left: The BC token to Boston 

I'holii by: llt'idi' Rroiikc 

Below; Ride n bike, stop pollution 

Pholo hy: )i),inn.i Aruiif; 

Bottom left: Really, it's on the way 

Plioki by: I It'ido Bronki' ' 




So you don't have a 
car. Or maybe you do 
have a car but the paucity 
of parking spaces has 
you so frustrated that 
you've sent it catapult- 
ing to rest at the bottom 
of the reservoir. Fret not! 
You can always take the 
T if you can scrounge up 
the change. If you can't 
sneak quarters out of 
your roommate's piggy 




The Various Ways To Go 



bank, try the B.C. Bus, 
which is free and only 
relatively hazardous to 
your health. (The only 
down side is that you 
can't bring your Pop- 
Tarts with you — no 
food or drink allowed.) If 
you have a mountain 
bike, you can get to class 
quickly and efficiently. 
Just don't pop any 
wheelies while you're 



crossing the T tracks. If 
you own knee pads (this 
may pertain to the 
hockey team) you might 
rollerblade your way to 
Faith, Reason and Reve- 
lation. If all else fails, use 
your feet. Remember, 
your father walked 
seven miles to school, 
barefoot, in the snow. 

Uphill. 

— Bridget Barry 



Transportation 165 



BOSTON 



Right: The waterfront for fish, food 
and fun 

Photo by: Cher^'l Simrany 




wjiA»r'^-:SSlll^ ^•: Jf- 




muilll I n f i^sam^aMMi l 



•'ggw w g g 'i y;! 



Right: The quest for knowledge 

Photo bv; Heide Bronke 



166 Boston 




Left: Historic food at Faneuil Hall 

Photo by: Chi'n'l Sinuanv 

Bolow: A typical tourist's sight 

I'luito by: Uoido hroivko 





For Boston, For Boston 



• • • 



Ask any Boston Col- 
lege student why he or 
she chose this particular 
institution, and one of the 
answers you'll probably 
receive is the great loca- 
tion. We are privileged 
to attend an excellent 
school in a quiet sub 
urban setting and yet, 
when we're looking for a 
little adventure, the city 
of Boston is only a T-ride 
away. Boston Common 
is a favorite place to 
sprawl out under the 



trees and watch the 
swan boats float by. 
Window-shopping (a 
pastime well-fitted for 
the college student's 
budget) can fill up a lazy 
day at Faneuil Hall, Cop- 
ley Place, or Newbury 
Street. Boston also af- 
fords us the opportunity 
to learn about the Revo- 
lutionary era through 
the Freedom Trail. For 
the cultured among us, 
there is the Museum of 
Fine Arts, the Museum 



of Science, and the 
Boylston theater district. 
Countless restaurants 
and clubs are available, 
enough in fact to ac- 
commodate almost any- 
one's taste in dinner and 
dancing. Whether 
you're in the mood for a 
night on the town or a 
day spent cultivating 
your intellect, Boston is 

the place to be. 

— Bridget Barry 



Boston 167 



IT'S TIME TO PARTY! 




Right: "Shadows" and "KMC" 
in an intense game of quarters. 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Below: Boston College's sur- 
roundings. 

Photo by: Beth Ahmuty & Heide M. Bronke 



Above: 99 bottles of beer on thi 
table. 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 



168 Partying 



low: Double the pleasure. 

'to by; Beth AhmuU' & Heide M. Bronke 

p right; Christine DuBois, Ann Bovle and Doue Schobel having a blast. 

'to by: Beth .^hmut>' & Heide M. Bronke " 

ttom right: E.J. sleeping on the floor, while others changed the music. 

to by: Cheryl Simranv 





// 



Party All The Time . 



// 



Boston College students 
are known for taking school 
seriously, but no one can say 
we don't know how to play! 
We work just as hard to track 
down good parties. Forget 
networking at the Career 
Center — just hang out on the 
Dustbowl for a while and 
you'll see where the social 
contacts are made. 
Someone's talking about an 
eight-kegger at the Big 
House. That sounds good, 
but will it be better at the 
House of Pain? No problem 



— just party-hop all night, 
leaving right after the keg is 
kicked and just before the 
cops arrive. Just be prepared 
for long keg lines, a scarcity of 
those red and blue plastic 
cups, and a crowd reminis- 
cent of Woodstock crammed 
into the living room. If that's 
not your speed, you can al- 
ways have a "get-together" at 
your apartment (classified as 
less bodies and more room to 
dance to your own music). 
Just be sure to serve alterna- 



tive beverages and finger 
foods (as recommended by 
the housing office) for those 
guests who choose not to in- 
dulge in alcohol. (It could 
happen). B.C. students love 
parties because it allows them 
to blow off steam and meet 
new people. Then there's al- 
ways the possibility of find- 
ing love — or some such var- 
iety of it. If that doesn't 
happen, there's always next 

weekend . . . 

— Bridget Barry 



Partying 169 



'TIS THE SEASON 




Right: The beginning of the Christ- 
mas season at B.C. 

Photo by: Cheryl Simrany 

Below: It's Frosty. 

Photo by; Heide M. Bronke 



Above: The Christmas Concert. 

Photo by: Heide M. Bronke 



170 Christmas 



flow: Everything is lit up. 

Jto bv: Cher>'l Siniranv 




Christmas 



Christmas at B.C. is a 
time when students rally 
together against the im- 
pending gloom of final 
exams to keep alive the 
spirit of excitement. 
There is a favorite B.C. 
tradition, the annual 
Christmas tree lighting 
in O'Neill Plaza. The en- 



tire campus is invited to 
congregate outside the 
library as the tree is lit for 
the first time. Father 
Monan presides over the 
ceremony and the Uni- 
versity Chorale leads 
everyone in singing 
Christmas carols. Sing 
along books are distrib- 



uted for those of us who 
always forget the second 
verse. Hot apple cider is 
available to keep every- 
body warm. This event 
marks the beginning of 
the holiday season for 
B.C. students. 

— Bridget Barry 



Christmas 171 



FRESHMAN LIFE 



Right: Look, Mom, I'm studying! 
Below: See? Freshmen have fun, too 
Bottom: There's always time for Nintendo 

Photos by: Ali Gianinno 



m 





Frosh! 



Can you remember 
your first day at BC? 
Your first floor meeting 
where your RA in- 
formed you that Newton 
and Upper are dry— 
Yeah, right! This was fol- 
lowed by ice cream 
socials and other orien- 
tation events, such as 
Salsa Night, Casino 
Night, and the Boston 
Harbor Cruise, where 
you came to meet the 
people who undoubt- 
edly enhanced your time 



at college. The students lost together on the buses, 
on Newton were doubly the Upper students en- 
blessed by a scenic joyed sleeping until ten 



campus and Stuart Din- 
ing Hall, while Upper 
Campus residents pro- 
vided vast amusement 
for the sophomores 
bearing low lottery num- 
bers. They also had to 
deal with McElroy din- 
ners . . . which explains 
the long lines at the Club 
every night. While New- 
ton students formed 
friendships by getting 



minutes before class. 

— James J. Conner 



Freshmen Life 



SOPHOMORE LIFE 



ght: Ahhh . . . the life of a sopho- 

ore 

)to by: Ali Gianinno 

low: Taking a walk on the wild 
ie 

)tct by; Tina Ting 




ove: What was your lottery 
mber? 

o bv: Ali Gianinno 



Sophomore Life, 
Revisited 



Lucky sophomores 
lived in Edmonds and 
had the dubious luxury 
of eating their own cook- 
ing, while many other 
sophomores lived next 
door in the suites of 
Walsh Hall and enjoyed 
the food of the Walsh 
cafeteria. The unfortu- 
nate sophomores lived 
in the uncoveted dorms 



of Upper and College 
Road. Sophomore year 
was marked by the first 
reuniting of friends after 
the summer break. This 
was also the year that 
those who had no clue 
what they wanted to do 
with their lives were 
forced to declare a ma- 
jor. When the second se- 
mester rolled around. 



many students started to 
finish up their core and 
became excited at finally 
being able to fully pur- 
sue their electives. Their 
joy was short lived as 
they quickly realized 
that their low collegiate 
status earned them a 
poor selection of open 
courses. 

— James R. Conner 



Sophomore Life 173 



JUNIOR LIFE 



Right: The mad rush for the BC 

shuttle 

Below: Sure, the bus will come any 

minute 

Photos bv: Ali Gianinno 




i^ f ff w 



I! ,TT 




1 ^ 



mmm 




BBpB^ 




Above: Familiar off-campus sights. 

Photos by: Ali Giannino 




Junior Year at BC 



For most Juniors, their 
third year was lived off 
campus. The convenient 
access to Cleveland 
Circle was definitely 
welcomed, however 
dealing with the buses 
became very trying at 
times. Ten minutes to 
get to class, the tempera- 
ture lies just below freez- 
ing, you can not wait to 
get into the bus as it pulls 
up . . . and drives by, 
more than full. With liv- 
ing off campus came 



many experiences: call- 
ing real estate agents, 
finding an apartment, 
dealing with landlords 
and handling household 
bills. Off campus parties 
are always an experience 
because there are basi- 
cally no RA's and one 
can have a keg without 
worrying about the anti- 
keg policy on campus. 
Unfortunately though, 
sometimes these parties 
would get out of hand 
leading to intervention 



by Boston Police and poor 
relations with neighbors. 
— James J. Conner 



174 Junior Life 



SENIOR LIFE 



3elow. A final view of the 'Mods' 
Right top: A new Senior developnient 
Right bottom: 80 Comm. Ave. has it all 

'hotos bv: All Gianinno 



VOUTE HALL 




EC":;.:: 



i 


80 


COMM AVE 


* 












SaimiMREJK'K 




■kJCl 1 .: 




"3- ^ 





• Chiplwvci] 




HMOL.. 






CAREER 
CENTER 



bove: Where do we go from here? 

"loto b\': Ali Gianinno 



The Final Chapter 



The long awaited year 
benefits the Senior with 
the choice of housing, 
the best classes, and the 
option of a lighter class 
load of four classes. 
(This lighter class load 
should be compensated 
with trips to the Career 
Center to start the al- 
most futile search for a 
job considering today's 
economy.) Senior Year is 
the one year that a per- 
son can feel completely 



comfortable partying in lege experience, culmi- 
the Mods or Hillsides, nated by the long awaited 



and going to the ten 
o'clock Sunday mass in 
St. Ignatius' basement, 
which has unofficially 
become the "weekly 
senior mass" . One of the 
highlights of first semes- 
ter senior year is Home- 
coming, while second 
semester is marked by 
the 92 Days party, which 
launches seniors into the 
homestretch of their col- 



Senior Week activities. 

— James J. Conner 



Senior Life 175 




176 Sports 



SPORTS 




'T^ 




^^mJ^ 


1^^ 




'^■■rsi — r 

- — • - V 


T 





mwB^ 




— --k^ 





(^ hampions aren't made in gyms. 
Champions are made from 
something they have deep inside 
them-a desire, a dream, a vision. 
They have to have last-minute 
stamina, they have to be a Uttle 
faster, they have to have the skill 
and the will. But the will must be 
stronger than the skill. 

~ Muhammad Ali 



Sports 177 



RIGHT: Flags fly high as the 
Eagles increase their lead to 
33 iri their triumph over 
Louisville. 

BELOW: The victorious 
Eagles salute their fans, 
(photos this page — Heide M. 
Bronke) 



m^: 



-^■-^■ 




^7 



'•.SBt^iWt- 



^ >i 



Ik, t: ■ 




Under New Management 



Eagles Reborn Under Coughlin 
Spotlight 



"There is nothing like a new beginning, and that is 
X what rookie coach, Tom Coughlin brought to the 
Eagles this season. The "new" Eagles feature 11 fresh- 
nan and sophomore starters, backed by the experi- 
nce of older players. The Eagles have had a tough 
chedule this season, playing such powerhouse teams 
s Miami, Michigan, Georgia Tech and Penn State, 
our nationally ranked teams. The team had a slow 
teirt, but began to accelerate with an impressive vic- 
ory over Louisville. From then on, the Eagles' turf 
iras lined with victories and impressive showings. 

Glerm Foley once again had a notable season as the 

ophomore quarterback who led the Eagles to victory 

St year. Especially notable were the Pittsburgh and 

Vest Virginia games in which Foley did not throw one 

uterception. It was Foley who broke all of Doug 

lutie's freshman passing records, and with 4,170 

inder his belt prior to the Miami game, he currently 

lolds the fourth highest career passing mark in the 

istory of Eagle's football. 

Another powerhouse player this season was senior 

fark Chmura. As tight end, Qimura has been noted 

r his pass catching. Chmura is credited with 39 

itches and 539 yards in reception yardage this fall, 

le highest of any Eagle receiver. Senior Charlie Bren- 

an brought his expertise to the field on the offensive 

ne with back-up stellar performances by tight end 

ete Mitchell and right guard Matt Metz. 

A new sensation, transfer Chuckle Dukes, landed a 

ireer high 201 runiung yards at Syracuse and promin- 

ntly brought his expertise to the field on the offensive 

ne with back-up stellar performances by tight end 

ete Mitchell and right gucird Matt Metz. 

A new sensation, transfer Chuckle Dukes, landed a 

ireer high 201 running yards at Syracuse and promin- 

tly brought back 23 kicks for 578 yards prior to the 

liami game. Dukes will undoubtedly prove valuable 

) the Eagles in years to come. 

The Eagles began their season with an inaugural 

ame versus Rutgers on the opponent's turf. The 

agles were eagerly anticipating this opening game. 

here were many new factors involved — a new coach 



and a new conference to start things off on a clean slate 
for the Maroon and Gold. Unfortunately, the Eagles 
had a disappoiiiting showing against Rutgers (13-20), 
but were determined to make a come back and show 
the world that there is nothing like a new beginning. 

The Eagles then played a tedious game against the 
hungry Wolverines. B.C. gave it their all but it was 
three fourth-quarter points that gave the Wolverines a 
35-13 victory. Senior Mark Chmura had an exceptional 
game, catching eight passes for 83 yards. Although the 
Eagles were defeated, many positive memories will 
linger concerning their effort and determination. 

Another two disappointing losses, to Georgia Tech 
(14-30) and to Penn State (21-28), left the Eagles feeling 
down and out until a smashing defeat against Louis- 
ville (33-3) boosted the team's morale. This game 
marked Coach Tom CoughUn's first win as head coach 
for the Eagles. In this game, Glenn Foley showed what 
he 'was really made of by breaking the 1000 yard sea- 
son passing mark. 

B.C., feeling confident and proud, then played 
West Virginia, a game that marked the first ever Big 
East confrontation to be held in Alumni Stadium. The 
Mountaineers proved to be a strong opponent for the 
Eagles and defeated them 31-24. Red-shirt freshman 
Dwight Shirley had an amazing game, running for 104 
yards and establishing himself as a powerful asset for 
the boys of Maroon and Gold. 

The next three games were ones of victory which 
proved that B.C. had worked hard all season and that 
payoffs were finally coming. With the help of out- 
standing performances from Dwight Shirley, junior 
transfer Chuckle Dukes, and Darnell Campbell, the 
Eagles came out with wins against Army (28-17), Pitts- 
burgh (38-12) and Temple (33-12). The Eagles offense 
was strongly supported by their dominating defense, 
especially Tom McManus who was strongly con- 
sidered one of the East's top defensive players. Un- 
fortunately, all their efforts combined was not enough 
to stop powerhouse Syracuse who defeated B.C. 
38-16. 



Spotlight 



The Eagle's overall spirit and determi- 
nation, two attributes common tho this 
season, can be seen in free safety #28, 
Charlie Brennan. A native of Detroit, 
Michigan and a Brother Rice graduate, 
Brennan has been ranked second in tack- 
ling- 

Brennan, who came to the Heights as a 
red-shirted freshman, will graduate this 
year with a degree in Marketing. The 
Eagles will be graced with Brennan's 
"powerhouse" presence for another year 
while he attends graduate school. 




TOP LEFT: QB Glenn Foley cocks his arm in 
hopes of becoming B.C.'s 3rd leading 
passer. He is now #4 with 4,170 yards, 
(photo — Matt West) 
TOP CENTER: B.C.'s David Guinta 
wrestles down a player in their opener 
against Rutgers, (photo — Matt West) 
TOP RIGHT: ParWtime! Ed Sanabria and 
friends celebrate after a touchdown against 
Louisville, (photo — Cheryl Simrany) 



Football IT-) 



RIGHT: Placekicker Sean Wright (#16) 
found much to be happy about in the early 
going against Miami. (Photo — Cheryl 
Simrany) BELOW: "Hurricane Warnings" 
didn't stop a capacity crowd from cheering 
on the Eagles. (Photo — Cheryl Simrany) 
BELOW RIGHT: Punter Bill Kushner 
(#12) gets a little help from a B.C. trainer 
during stretching. (Photo — Joanna 
Arong) 









Scoreboard 


m 


> The 


m 


13 


Rutgers 


20 


13 


Michigan 


35 


14 


Georgia Tech 


30 


21 


Penn State ; 


28 


33 


Louisville 


3 


24 


West Virginia : 


31 


28 


Army 


17 


38 


Pittsburgh : 


12 


33 


Temple ] 


13 


16 


Syracuse ' 


58 


14 


Miami ] 


19 





"Hurricane Warnings 



ABOVE: Tailback Darnell Campbell (#32) 
found the running room necessary to keep 
B.C. in the game until the end. (Photo — 
Cheryl Simrany) 



I 4'iami took home a 19-14 victory 
VXagainst the Eagles on the much antic- 
ated last game of the season on the turf of 
e Heights. It was seven years ago to the 
ly that Doug Flutie's famous "Hail Mary" 
iss allowed B.C. to emerge victorious 
;ainst the Hurricanes. Those memories 
hoed the sold-out stadium on this No- 
!mber in 1991. This match against Miami 
as a testament to the determination and 
ughness that has become a trademark of 
aach Couglin's new and improved team, 
/en ending the season with a little im- 
roved 4-7 record, the hard fought loss to 
umber One Miami, who barely escaped 
ith their rank intact, is a promising sign of 



things to come. 

After playing one of the second toughest 
schedules in the nation, the Eagles should 
be well-seasoned for next year. Several sen- 
iors played out their last downs for Boston 
College including Tony Bajak, Waldy 
Clark, and Matt Metz. Best of luck goes to 
Mark Chmura, who is expected to be a first- 
round draft pick in the NFL. However, QB 
Foley will be back, along with running 
backs Chuckle Dukes, Darnell Campbell, 
and Dwight Shirley to lead the offense. The 
McManus-led defense remains mainly in- 
tact and, with a significantly easier 
schedule next year, things should be look- 
ing up for the Eagles. 



Football 181 



RIGHT: Eagle wide receiver 
Michael Campbell makes a 
spectacular catch in B.C.'s 
heartbreaker with West Vir- 
ginia, (photo — Cheryl Sim- 
rarw) 

BELOW: Rookie Coach Tom 
Coughlin shows concern over 
his Eagles' play in their open- 
er agamst Rutgers, (photo — 
Matt West) 



L 



-w 



iiE 



tj» 



;'*i^ 



182 Football 




LEFT: The Eagles' defensive line provided 
QB Glenn Foley with plenty of time to find 
his receivers this year, (photo — Cheryl 
Simrany) 

BELOW LEFT: The offensive line takes a 
breather on the side lines, (photo — Heide 
M. Bronke) 

BELOW RIGHT: Tail back David Green 
drives to gain yardage against the WV de- 
fense, (photo — Cheryl Simrany) 






■ S 




LEFT: Eagle Touchdown! (photo — Heide 
M. Bronke) 

RIGHT: It's up and . . . it's good! Kicker 
Sean Wright boots a point after an Eagle 
score, (photo — Cheryl Simrany) 



Footall 183 



RIGHT: New Head Coach Tom Coughlin 
made quite a transition from NFL to 
NCAA. (Photo — Heide M. Bronke) 
BELOW: Coughlin's "tough" work ethic 
paid off in keeping the Eagles close in criti- 
cal games. (Photo — Hans Schemmel) 
BOTTOM: Coughlin helped gain the re- 
spect of his players through an open and 
direct line of communication. (Photo — 
Hans Schemmel) 





NFL TO NCAA 



Coughlin Ignites Eagles 



On December 28, 1990, Boston College 
was given a "better late than never" 
Christinas gift — the appointment of Tom 
Coughlin as the thirty-first head coach of 
football at the Heights. Approximately one 
month later, Coughlin arrived at the 
Heights a changed man, having a Giant's 
Super Bowl Championship behind him. 
Coach Coughlin had been receivers coach 
for the Giants since 1988. With Coughlin's 
solid reputation as a coach and memories of 
his seasons in the early eighties with the 
Eagles, Boston College was anticipating an 
experienced coach with previous dedica- 
tion and ties to B.C. They got exactly what 
they hoped for, with many promising sea- 
sons still to come. 

A native of Waterloo, N.Y., Coughlin 
was a standout scholastic star at Waterloo 
High School. From there he attended Syra- 
cuse University and was a three year letter- 
man. A wingback for the Orangemen, 
Coughlin won Syracuse's Orange Key 
Award that year as the University's out- 
standing senior scholar-athlete. 

Tom Coughlin began his extensive 
coaching career in 1970 at the Rochester In- 
stitute of Technology. The following year, 
he was named head coach of R.l.T. , and re- 
mained there for three seasons. With an im- 



pressive record, Coughlin headed back ti 
his alma mater, Syracuse, as defensi 
coordinator, playing a major role in the] 
victory in the '79 Independence Bowl. 

This is Coughlin's second associati' 
with the Heights and the Eagles. He wasi 
member of Jack Bicknell's original coach: 
staff in 1980. He also helped to bring Bosti 
College to levels of natural success. To: 
Coughlin saw Doug Flutie become one 
the game's most prolific players, ultimate: 
winning the Heisman trophy in 1984. 

In 1988, Coach Coughlin was selected by 
Giant's head coach, BUI Parcells, to coach 
the pass receivers. During his tenure with 
the Giants, their record was excellent, with 
Coughlin's grand finale being the Super 
Bowl Championship in Tampa. 

In future years. Coach Coughlin ha 
great expectations for the Eagles. He ii 
quoted as saying, "What this program ii 
going to be about is achievement! As we gi 
forth in the era of the nineties, we are ex 
cited about the formation of the Big Eas 
Football Conference and what it will meai 
to our program. The conference affiliatioi 
has provided us with a vehicle for nations 
prominence." Under the command d 
Coach Tom Coughlin, the Eagles canno 
help but soar next season. 



184 Football 




ABOVE: The B.C. — Louisville battleline. 

(photo — Heide M. Bronke) 

LEFT: The offensive line gets a pep talk 

from Coach Maser. (photo — Cheryl Sim- 

rany) 

RIGHT: Darnell Campbell hits the hole for a 

gain, (photo — Matt West) 



186 Football 




LEFT: Mark Chmura did it all 
this year. Here he makes an ex- 
citing touchdown catch, (photo 
— Matt West) 

BELOW: HALFTIME! (photo — 
Heide M. Bronke) 
BELOW LEFT: LB Tom 
McManus and CB Jay McGillis 
enjoy a brief moment during the 
Lousville rout, (photo — Cheryl 
Simrany) 




Football 187 




TOP: The Eagles had no trouble getting out of the starting blocks 

this year. 

ABOVE: A B.C. runner just waits for the right time to make his 

move. 

RIGHT: The Eagles kept their composure under the pressure of 

serious competition. 

(All photos: Kevin Keating) 



188 Track and Field 




i4«tW»-'. 



Off and Running 



Eagles Track Down NCAA's 



ABOVE: And they're off! 



mpressive. Very impressive. 
Those are the very words to 
scribe the performances of the 
en and women's Track and 
Bid teams this season. With 
ong showings in both the 
!w England TAC Invitahonal 
Harvard, as well as at the Ter- 
r Classic at B.U., the Eagles 
!re ready and willing to show 
Jir stuff at the New England 
loor Championships, on their 
ly to possible winning strides 
the IC4A's and ECAC's (the 
?n's and women's eastern 
ampionships). Head Coach 



Karen Dobbs could even be see- 
ing several of her Eagles in In- 
dianapolis for the NCAA's. 

Likely Lady Eagles looking to- 
ward the New England's in- 
clude sophomore Tiffany Young 
in the 200 meter as well as the 55, 
Maria Dipina in the 800 meters, 
junior Marielle Flinterman in the 
55mHH., Jennifer Rolfe and 
Heather Grimshaw in the 300m 
and Kim Facey in the long jump. 
Qualifying for the IC4A's and 
hopefully on the way to Indian- 
apolis is the powerful men's Dis- 
tant Medley Relay team of Sean 



McEllin, Jason Greene, Brian 
Murphy, and Keith Yuen. Foot- 
ball speedster Waldy Clark also 
qualified for the New England's 
and the IC4A's with his impres- 
sive performances in the 55me- 
ters. Long jump star Bret Harris 
came up big when he set a new 
B.C. record of 24 feet and four 
and three quarter inches in the 
Terrier Classic. With individuals 
performing as these Eagles con- 
tinue to do, it is not just a wish- 
ful hope of Coach Dobbs to 
make it to Indianapolis for the 
NCAA's in March. 



Track and Field 189 




Scoreboard 



lis 

1 


3 
2 
3 

3 
1 
3 
2 

3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
3 



Them 

U. Of Portland 2 

U. Conn 1 

Syracuse 4 

B.U. 1 

Villanova 1 

Seton Hall 2 

Dartmouth 3 

U. Pittsburgh 1 

Brown U. 

Georgetown 4 

Hartford 2 

U. Central Florida 1 

Stetson University 2 

U. Rhode Island 3 

St. John's 1 

Providence 2 

St. Francis 

Holy Cross 




TOP LEFT: Cornering a St. John's player, 
Dan McGuire attempts a daring slide 
tackle. 

TOP MIDDLE: John Neuhauser makes a 
strategic attack against a strong offensive 
force. 

TOP RIGHT: Showing excellent ball con- 
trol, Dan McGuire works fast to get a shot 
in while the goalie is down. 
ABOVE: As the Eagles celebrate a goal, 
they are threatened by a cheap shot from an 
angrv St. John's goalie. (AH photos — Paul 
Hezel) 



190 Men's soccer 



Youth Movement 

Young Eagles Show Promise 



Although the men's soccer team 
had a slow beginning to their 8-7-3 
season, things began to accelerate 
about half way through the season 
with impressive victories over long 
time rivals Villanova (3-1) and Boston 
University (2-1). It was a 2-1 victory 
over #1 ranked St. John's that left 
everyone impressed and hopeful of 
Eagle dominance for the rest of the sea- 
son. Games like St. Francis (1-0) and 
double overtime (2-2) against Provi- 
dence continued to instill faith and 
hope in the '91 Eagles. 

Under the direction of two time Big 
East coach Ed Kelly, the Eagles con- 
tinued their winning streak and closed 
the season with a 3-0 bashing of arch- 
rivals Holy Cross. Although Kelly was 
disappointed that the Eagles did not 
get a bid for the tournament, his belief 
and determination in his players was 
an integral part of the overall attitude 
of the team. He knew it would take 
time and a few games for the new 
players to adjust and play together as a 
team. Throughout the season, Ed Kelly 
relied on and believed in performance 
and newfound enthusiasm rather than 



statistics. 

The freshmen not only adjusted 
throughout the season, but also proved 
themselves to be important factors in 
the Eagles' strategies. Freshman full- 
back, Carlos Cassas was named Rookie 
Of The Year for his amazing perform- 
ances throughout the season. Rob 
Schweitzer, Joe Vega, and Dan Mc- 
Guire have also emerged as some of the 
most effective and constant players 
that the Eagles have to offer. 

An experienced player, junior Justin 
Ciccarelli finished another successful 
year at the Heights scoring twenty 
points — nine goals and two assists, to 
add to his already impressive record. 
Following right behind him was Ni- 
gerian native Chris Ogbonnah, often 
dubbed "Mr Instant Offensive," scor- 
ing seven points for the Eagles. Goalie 
Brian Boussy was noted for having a 
season record of sixty shots on goal. 

All in all the B.C. Eagles Men's soc- 
cer team had an impressive showing 
the end of the season. With twenty-onj 
players eligible to return next seaso: 
Coach Ed Kelly is looking forward to 
year of dominance for the Eagles. 




LEFT: Goalie Brian Boussy, 
shows off his vertical as he 
sets up the Eagle offense. 
BELOW: The Eagles' de- 
fenders line up for the firing 
squad in preparation for the 
free shot on goal. 





*^ 





ABOVE: Eagle Joe Vega (#8) 
showed "heads up" play this 
year. (Photo — Paul J. Hezel) 
RIGHT: The sky was the limit 
for Dan McGuire this year. 
(Photo — Heide M. Bronke) 




192 Men's Soccer 











LEFT: Eagle speed kept opponents back on 
their heels. (Photo — Heide M. Bronke) 
LOWER LEFT: Dan Atanasov (#10) sur- 
veys the field before a pass. (Photo — Paul 
J. Mezel) BELOW: Carlos Casas (#5) cap- 
tured Big East Rookie of the Year with an 
amazing show of speed and talent. (Photo 
— Heide M. Bronke) 





f^ 



Spotlight 



Senior Brendan McCarthy will 
have a lot to be proud of when 
he looks back on his soccer career 
at Boston College. A stopper/ 
sweeper, McCarthy has been a 
starter for four years, and captain 
of the team his junior and senior 
years. 

A recipient of the "McElroy Scholarship Award," 
Maryland native McCarthy attributes much of his 
enthusiasm for the game of soccer to the camraderie and 
competition that exists in the sport. One of his most 
memorable times is his game-winning goal against arch 
rival Georgetown in his junior year. Another great 
highlight of his career is the Eagles' '90-'91 powerhouse 
season in which the team was crowned Big East 
Champions. McCarthy claims that the soccer program at 
B.C. was an invaluable experience and one that he will 
never forget. 






TOP: Choosing a strategic spot, Joe Vega 
watches his shot get by a goalie who is just 
not quick enough. 

ABOVE: Looking on in total awe, a St. 
John's player studies Dan McGuire's un- 
usual moves. 

LEFT: Eagle Justin Ciccarelli waits with Dan 
McGuire for a forward pass. 



Men's Soccer 195 



Rough and Tough 



Lax Men Sticks It To Em 



A s the 1992 Men's La- 
TA-crosse team kicks off 
leir spring season March 
th against Big East rival 
ieorgetown, they will be 
)oking to improve on their 
)1 6-8 losing season. If 
leir successful fall exhibi- 
on campaign is any indi- 
ation of their strengths 
nd v^^eaknesses, things 
hould definitely be look- 
\g up for the Eagles. 
Coached by Ed Moy, the 
agles are led by senior tri- 



captain Colin McLane on 
attack. Along with All- 
American candidate Mark 
Gaffney, McLane should 
present a powerful threat 
against a strong defense. 
Fellow tri-captains Dave 
Defranco and Mark Wolf- 
ington will provide the 
Eagles with support and 
leadership from the mid- 
field. Junior goalie Victor 
lanno is going to have a 
tough job filling the shoes 
of graduate Michael Hol- 



land, but sources say he's 
definitely worthy of the 
task. With aggressive and 
dominating play from the 
strong core of junior and 
sophomore players, these 
fellows have the potential 
to come back with a venge- 
ance from last year's sea- 
son and even gain a playoff 
spot come May. 




BOVE: The rough and tumble play of B.C.'s Lax team kept crowds 

eased all season. 

;GHT: Eagle lacrosse is beginning to get the recognition it de- 

n'es. 

Jl photos-Ali Giannino) 




Men's Lacrosse 197 



RIGHT: Former Eagle Ted Crowley (#11) 

stays close to his old teammate John Joyce 

(#27). 

BELOW: Team U.S.A., or shall we call it 

Team B.C.? (All photos — Matt West) 






Red, White, and Gold 

Ex-Eagles Shine in New Setting 



bn Oct.! 



Be. hockey i. 
• a special su 
— a surprise t 
once even.' foii/^are. 
1991, the U.S. t-itepic Budcey Te 
took Conte ForuWiv force. But th?re 
was an added boiT 
featured six former B.C^agles: 1991 
HobyBakei^te 

Guerin, ^Bfa^^roWley, Martv 
Mclnnis, Stev^TTt- 1 j«eT9TWf bc© 
Gordon. ^n eerie t^lingxame Qvei 
the FoJmF^ero^S^Pffie tur'm 
MarooiA|id/GccUlSambia£4:U.or ti 
points, i 

Heinzj ^ 

NHiMHMMKt>rdo,^MHIV!^n the. 



iC. off^pse a! 





irig oniaone goal 
pver B.Cjor many 
je't thisA'as their 
aek since j 
id 
_^^^ 5^ 
:)layers ^^mn he s 

really miss being here." 

uly nostalgic afternoon 

wtnrrrTaw a starting six of Emma, 

rowley, Heinze, Mclnnis, Guerin, 

ordon in the red, white, and 

of Team U.S.A., B.C. hockey 













-■ «■ 




^ 


Bt 






o 




i 


« 


/ 


'i 


t 


<^ 













CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Team 
U.S.A. goalie Scott Gordon is 

foing to nave to be at the top of 
is game if his team expects to 
win a Gold. 

Former B.C. Eagle Bill Guerin 
(#23) has been an integral part of 
Team U.S.A.'s success, 
Eagle Captain Joe Cieary (#23) 
was only one of four seniors left 
after the Olympic exodus from 
B.C. 

With a team full of underclass- 
men. Assistant Captain David 
Fransoza's leadership qualities 
will be needed more than ever 
this season. 

Steve Heinze (#12) has been on 
fire for his new Olympic team. 



Men's Hockey 199 




ABOVE: Although faced with 
severe handicaps this season, 
the Eagles played with pride 
and determination. (Photo — 
Cheryl Simrany) 



Fighting Back 



Eagles Play Against the Odds 



This year's men's ice hockey 
team faced severe hand- 
icaps before the season even 
started. The Olympic crusade to 
Albertville, France excavated 
the team leaving only five re- 
turning seniors — Captain Joe 
Cleary, Mike Delay, David 
Franzosa, Jason Rathbone, and 
Mike Silva. The infamous 
"HEM" line, Steve Heinze, 
David Emma, and Marty 
Mclnnis, and the likes of Bill 
Guerin and Ted Crowley opted 
to pack up their skates in search 
of Olympic gold. If this was not 
enough, junior goalie Scott La- 
Grand was suspended by the 
NCAA "as a result of a self- 
disclosed infraction of NCAA 
legislation," according to 
Athletic Director Gladchuck. By 
the time the suspension had 
lifted, LaGrand had missed the 
two pre-season games against 



the Canadian Nationals and the 
USA Olympic Hockey Team and 
regular season games versus St. 
Lawrence, Clarkson, Michigan 
State, and Vermont. When the 
smoke cleared. Coach Ceglar- 
ski's young Eagles found them- 
selves with a dismal 1-2-1 start 
which included an embarrassing 
9-3 routing by Vermont. 

The Eagles were plagued with 
youth. With only five returning 
seniors. Coach Ceglarski was 
forced to sport eleven freshmen 
in the starting lineup, including 
highly touted Ian Moran. Early 
on, things looked disorganized 
as the freshmen were dazzled by 
top-notch HOCKEY EAST play. 
Scott LaGrand was their saving 
grace, making over thirty saves a 
game with a career high of forty- 
eight saves in a win over North- 
eastern. A loud call for leader- 
ship rang out, and Captain Joe 



Cleary and Assistant Captain 
David Franzosa responded. 
Cleary played sound and strong 
defense as Franzosa continued 
to be one of the top ten scorers in 
HOCKEY EAST this season. 
Rookies Rob Canavan and Ryari 
Haggerty wowed crowds wHj 
dazzling glimpses of the futurl 
Sophomore Mike Spalla ah 
bloomed into a scorer movinf 
from defense to right wing. 

Rebuilding wasn't the ide^ 
situation for Len Ceglarski' s laS 
year as head coach but he did :' 
with the dignity and excellence 
characteristic of his thirty-four 
years at B.C. Not one to make 
excuses, Ceglarski pushed his 
team, keeping them at or near 
.500 all season. Coach Ceglarski 
accurately characterized the sea- 
son when he said, "I think we 
held our own." And that they 
did. 



200 Men's Ice Hockey 




f^ 



Spotlight 



Experience was one thing the ice 
hockey team did not have enough of 
i ' this year. With fourteen freshman taking 

1 "^1^^ turns on the ice, someone had to step 
' \^ / forward and take charge. Right from the 

>C^ start that person was senior defense- 

man, Joe Cleary. As one of the team's 
hardest hitters with a dangerously powerful shot, Cleary was 
the key to the Eagles' success all year long. 

Joe was one of the best players, if not the best player on this 
hockey team," noted coach Len Ceglarski. "When he was out 
on the ice, we were a much better team." 

Qeary was forced into the limelight after four would-be 
starters opted to play on the Olympic National Team. Losing 
them cost the Eagles roughly 100 goals and put a lot of pressure 
on Cleary and the rest of the defense to adopt a more offensive 
role. Cleary needed a banner year to top last year when he 
ended up second among the team's defensemen in all three 
scoring categories (4 goals, 19 assists). 

"Looking back, there has been no greater feeling than going 
to the Final Four my sophomore year," says Cleary. "After the 
game we just stood in awe and stared at the crowd. It was great 
to have all that hard work pay off. Thaf s what this game is all 
about." 



LEFT: Freshman Ian Moran (#13) gave B.C. 
fans glimpses of the future. 
BELOW: Freshman Ryan Haggerty (#9) 
proved himself to be one of the top rookie 

grospects this year. 
OTTOM: Teamwork helped gel a young 
team together. (All photos — Cheryl Sim- 
rany) 



r 




Men's Ice Hockey 201 




RIGHT: The Maroon and Gold gather for a 
moment of silence before the game. 
BELOW: Moran (#13), Franzosa (#28), and 
Joyce (#27) celebrate after a B.C. goal. (All 
photos — Matt West) 




202 Men's Hockey 





LEFT: B.C.'s top net-minder, Scott La- 
Grand (#34), holds the short side. 
BELOW LEFT: The Eagles had no intention 
of being pushed around this year. 
BELOW: Red Light even in the absence of 
the touted HEM line, B.C.'s promising 
freshmen found their way to the net. 






FAR LEFT: Opponents gave B.C.'s young 
team no mercy. 

LEFT: After a slow start, LaCrand appeared 
to be in top form. 



Men's Hockey 203 



iM 



NO MERCY! 



Beanpot Disasters Strike Again 



Date: 02/03/92 
Place: Boston Garden 
Suspect: Harvard Crimson 
Charge: No Mercy 

That is exactly what Harvard 
showed against B.C. in the opening 
round of the 1992 Beanpot — NO 
MERCY. The Harvard Crimson 
skated all over a young and d-e-f-e- 
n-c-e-1-e-s-s B.C. team, peppering 
junior goalie Scott LaGrand with 37 
shots. With senior captain Joe 
Cleary out with a knee injury, the 
Eagles defense crun\bled and re- 
sembled Swiss cheese, leaving 
many holes for the Crimson to 
attack. After the first period, the 
Eagles had tallied only four shots on 
goal. By the end of the second. Har- 
vard led in shots 30-10. Why? "We 
just didn't come out skating in the 
first forty minutes," answered 
Coach Ceglarski. 

Without going into the finer de- 
tails of this heartfelt loss, it is suf- 
ficient to say that the Eagles lost 6-4. 
However, 6-4 is a kindness of simple 
hockey arithmetic. This game 
wasn't even close. For Coach 
Ceglarski, this loss left him with a 2- 
19 Beanpot record. It would have 
been nice for Ceglarski, college 
hockey's winningest coach, to cap- 
ture the Beanpot title in his final 
year as head coach at B.C., but it just 
wasn't meant to be. "Our kids were 
souped up before the game," said 
Ceglarski, "maybe too much." Our 
guys tried, they really did. But, for 
what ever reason, be it the mystique 
they are too young to understand or 
just lack of experience, they 
couldn't do it. The best thing that 
can be said about the whole experi- 
ence is — at least we didn't lose to 
B.U. 

204 Beanpot 




TOP: Once again, the Boston Garden swallowed up the Eagles' chances in the Beanpi 
ABOVE: Hey! — At least it wasn't B.U., okay? 
(All photos — Joanna Arong) 




rhe image is all too clear in any BC hockey fan's mind. 
Arms folded. Pacing slowly behind his team. Eyes 
xed on the action out on the ice. Overflowing with 
iassurance and confidence. For 20 seasons at BC, Len 
!eglarski defined the term success. He served as the 
ead coach of some of the best college hockey teams to 
ver play the game. When he stepped down after this 
ear's season he left behind a legacy of athletic excel- 
!nce, not orUy as one of BC's finest coaches but as one of 
s best players. 

In his 34 years of coaching, Ceglarski passed many re- 
larkable milestones. He entered this season as the 
'inningest coach in college hockey history with an in- 
edible record of 659-319-35, only to have it improved 
uring the 1991-92 season. In his 20 years at BC, Ceglar- 
d managed to consistently post winning seasons, mak- 
ig Boston College a perermial power in college hockey. 

Ceglarski also excelled as the head coach at Carkson 
mversity, where he began coaching college hockey in 
?58. In 14 seasons there, he compiled a record of 254-97- 
3, including 11 consecutive trips to the EC AC Tourna- 
lent, one ECAC championship and four NCAA 
oumament berths, three times advancing to the nat- 
»nal finals. In addition, Ceglarski earned the Spenser 
eiu'ose Award, given to the National Coach of the Year, 
I his eighth year as head coach. 

He came to BC for the 1971-72 season and in his first 



End of an Era 



B.C. Says Farewell to a Legend 



year accumulated a 22-7-1 record and took his team to the 
ECAC Championship game and the NCAA Final Four. 
For such an outstanding year he was given his second 
Spenser Penrose Award. He was voted National Coach 
of the Year for the third and final time after his 1984-85 
season when his Eagles went 28-15-2, went to the NCAA 
Final Four and were HOCKEY EAST Champions in only 
its first year of existence. 

In fact, in the HOCKEY EAST'S seven year history, 
Ceglarski has captured the regular season title six times 
and won the HEA Tournament title twice. In 1987 and 
1990. 

"For me, the highlight of my coaching career has def- 
initely been going to the Final Four," noted coach Cegla- 
rski. "There's just no experience like competing with the 
best teams in the country under those critical circum- 
stances. It's what you strive for every single season." 

In 1990, coach Ceglarski was recognized for his 
achievements when he was awarded the Lester Patrick 
Trophy by the National Hockey League and the Patrick 
family. The trophy is only given to a very select group of 
individuals, those who have had a strong impact on the 
game of ice hockey. Few have been more deserving than 
Ceglarski. 

On the West wall of the Conte Forum is a plaque sig- 
nying Ceglarski's membership into the Boston College 
Varsity Club Hall of Fame. This club is comprised of BC's 
all-time greatest atheletes from 1926's to 1980's. While at 
BC, Ceglarski starred as both a hockey and baseball 
player. 

On the ice he led his team to the NCAA's as a sopho- 
more and helped his team clinch the Championship vic- 
tory against Dartmouth in 1949. Ceglarski went on to see 
his team through two more successful seasons and even- 
tually graduated fourth on the all-time scoring list (49-59- 
108). As a baseball player, Ceglarski played outstanding 
defense at second base and hit .374 for his career. 

"I've had so much fun in all my time at BC," reflects 
Ceglarski. "There's so many outstanding people here. 
I'm very grateful to be associated with them. This school 
has such a great hockey tradition and I'm just happy to 
be a part of it." 

So what's next for one of BC's all-time best? "I don't 
know," he says. "Tm going to take it easy for a while. I'm 
looking forward to vacationing a little. After a couple of 
months . . . who knows? As of right now, though, I have 
no plans." 

Len Ceglarski 205 




School's Out! 



Women Learn Winning Ways 



The women's ice hockey team 
is one of the most over- 
looked and overshadowed 
athletic teams in Boston College 
Athletics. Late night practices 
and underattended games have 
kept the "Lady Eagles" behind 
the spotlight. Despite this. 
Coach Tommy O'Malley and his 
team have worked hard and, by 
midseason this year, posted the 
team's best record ever, 11-2. 
Quite an improvement over last 
year's 9-11-4 record. Two big 
wins over the University of 



Maine (7-1 and 4-2), one of the 
greatest forces in Hockey East, 
showed contenders that these 
Eagles are to be taken seriously. 
Part of the team's success is due 
to the captivating play of senior 
captain and goalie Kerri 
Tiernan. "She's up there with 
the best of them," says Coach 
O'Malley. Not to be outdone by 
her sister, sophomore Amy 
Tiernan has helped spark the 
"Lady Eagles" with her gifted 
scoring touch. This year's team 
also sported the greatest num- 



/M 



ber of incoming freshman evi 
The growing number of female 
high school hockey teams is nc 
doubt largely responsible foi 
this growth. As the team's suc- 
cess continues to grow, so will 
its proper recognition. "We arc 
still a club sport on paper, but 
we are treated as a pseudo — 
varsity team by the school," says 
O'MaUey. If the "Lady Eagles" 
continue to soar, no "goal" will 
be unattainable, even varsity||j 
status. 



)i 



208 Women's Ice Hockey 





^ 



PPOSITE PAGE: The Lauy Eagles surprised competition with ex- 

fllentplay that put them near the top of HOCKEY EAST. 

JP: The Eagles broke out of the HOCKEY EAST ceUar with upsets 

?er Maine. 

BOVE: Coach Tom O'Malley worked hard to obtain first-rate skills 

am his players. 

BOVE RIGHT: Celebrahon for the Lady Eagles happened on more 

an one occasion. 

GHT: The phenomenal play and leadership of Senior Captain and 

>alie Kerri Tieman gave competitors something to worry about. 

Jl photos — Joanna Arong) 



Women's Ice Hockey 209 




TOP: Wrestlers locked in battle. 
(Photo — Sue Brown) ABOVE: 
This classic sport pits man 
against man. (Photo — Hans 
Schemmel) ABOVE RIGHT: A 
B.C. grappler heeds advice 
from the coach. (Photo — Hans 
Schemmel) RIGHT: Two B.C. 
wrestlers practice combat. 
(Photo — Sue Brown) OP- 
POSITE PAGE: One blink of 
the eye and you could end up on 
your back. (Photo — Hans 
Schemmel) 





M 



Take Down! 



B.C. Wrestlers Seek Edge 



^he Boston College wrestling 
team had a challenging line-up 
lis season, but the grapplers man- 
ned to get a grip on the season with 
leir 34-7 crushing defeat of 
merican International at Spring- 
eld, MA. The team is a young one, 
at one that is constantly improving 
iroughout the season. The Eagles 



had a very successful match on Sat- 
urday, November 16, when they 
placed fourth in a field of thirteen 
teams in the Roger Williams College 
Invitational in Rhode Island. Under 
the command of Coach Buttry, the 
fledgling team has great hopes for 
their next season at the Heights. 



Wrestling 211 





TOP: BC swimmers tried to stay a stroke ahead of the competi- 
tion. 

ABOVE: Team support helped STREAMLINE Eagle perform- 
aiice. 

RIGHT: On your mark, get set, GO! Eagle swimmers left their 
coinpetition on the starting block. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: Float like a BUTTERFLY, sting like a bee. Eagle 
swimmers soared above their opponents. 
(All photos — Cheryl Simrany) 



% 




1F» ft* 



212 Men's Swimming 









41 J^^ ^^ 



^ 





\ 



''.*•*" 



Streamline 



Eagles Plunge Forward 



This year's Men's Swim team 
was arguably the fastest group 
ever to swim at the Heights. 
When the season began, the 
Eagles were looking to improve 
upon last year's record of 10-3. 
This was a realistic goal. Because 
of great recruiting by head coach 
Tom Groden, the Eagles had a 
lot of contributing freshman and 
sophomores who gave the team 
incredible depth and the talent 
necessary to win the big meets. 
Freshman Will Powley, in orJy 
!iis second month of collegiate 
:ompetition, broke a BC record 



for the 200 meter backstroke 
with a time of 1:55.90. 

The team was also much more 
cohesive on a personal level 
than BC teams of the past. Per- 
haps this was a result of the 
strong leadership given by cap- 
tains Maarten Kraaijvanger and 
Mike Ryan. Kraaijvanger was a 
four-time record breaker, turn- 
ing in remarkable times in the 
200, 500, 1000, and 1650 free- 
style. Ryan broke records in the 
butterfly and as part of a medley 
relay. 

In fact, this year's team broke 



BC records an unusually high 
number of times. Junior Curt 
Jablonowski was particularly 
impressive. Nicknamed "Hero" 
because of his ability to excel in 
several strokes. Curt broke 
records in both the breaststroke 
and the backstroke. 

With a very competitive New 
England conference the Eagles 
were tested aD season long, but, 
with its strong leadership, the 
team managed to come through 
in the clutch. 



Men's Swimming 213 



Sv 



RIGHT: Two B.C. swimmers take a 
breather before racing. (Photo — Heide M. 
Bronke.) BELOW: Team Spirit has given 
B.C's women swimmers the ultimate edge. 
(Photo — Cheryl Simrany) 





214 Women's Swimming 




Water Works 



Women Mirror Winning Ways 



The Boston College Swimming 
Team has had a very bright sea- 
son under the command of Coach 
Tom Grodon. Like so many teams 
around the Heights, the most recent 
recruiting class has landed some 
outstanding freshmen women 
swimmers. Senior Rosemarie Deleo 
and her powerhouse breaststroke, 
which led her to victory in the New 
England Championships, is just one 
example of the quality swimming at 
the Heights this year. Heather 



Bickle is the sophomore stand-out 
described as a "versatile and tireless 
woman" who particularly excels in 
the 50 meter and 200 meter butter- 
fly, as well as in the 500 meter free- 
style. The Eagles real strength is 
with the relay teams, who in the 
past have dominated the New En- 
gland Championship games. With 
leadership and power behind them, 
the Eagles cannot help but be a suc- 
cess. 




TOP: Despite a small facility and a shallow 
following, B.C's women kept in stroke. 
(Photo — Cheryl Simrany) ABOVE: B.C's 
women swimmers left opponents on the 
starting block. (Photo — Cheryl Simrany) 



Women's Swimming 215 




America's Pastime 



Eagles Carry On Tradition 



The '91 Spring Season of the 
Men's Baseball Team was its 
most promising. For the first time 
ever, the Eagles made it to the Big 
East Tournament, playing the top 
three teams in the league. Although 
they lost, consolation came as their 
conquerors, Villanova, went on to 
become Big East Champions. The 
power of last year's team came from 
having the top two pitchers in the 

216 Men's Baseball 



Big East, Doug MacNeil '91 and 
Brian Cooney '92, both of whom 
have gone on to pro careers — 
Cooney with the Expos, and Mac- 
Neil with the Mets. 

With the loss of these top 
pitchers, the Eagles are looking to 
other areas for strength. Second 
baseman Brian Kelly was chosen for 
All Big East last year, and he will be 
a key component for the defense 



this season. Senior tri-captains Jerry 
Varnum, Chris Taylor, and Dave 
Frasier will be depended upon to 
lead the team, which is made up of a 
large majority of junior starters. Top 
pitcher for the spring is looking to be 
Chris Higgins, after his strong fall 
season. One interesting develop- 
ment that may bring about some 
changes in the spring try outs is the 
addition of Eagles football players to 
the baseball line-up. Coach Cough- 
lin is the first football coach to allow 
his players to participate in a two- 
sport program. If anything, the '92 
season should prove to be exciting 
for B.C. baseball fans. 



i^ 



Diamond Devils 



mi>\Nomen Play "Hardball" 



The women's Softball team had a 
successful season for 1991 as 
rhey placed in the ECAC Cham- 
pionship. Proud of their outstand- 
ng performance, the team has great 
xpectations for this season. Under 
he command of powerhouse play- 
rs Donna Statler, Roseanne 
^heenan, and Stacey Bearsty, the 
eam's main forte is their defensive 
performance, which led them to 



numerous victories last year. A 
major loss was their catcher, who 
graduated in May, but the strong 
core of juniors and seniors this year 
should make up the difference. 
With top hitters in Statler, Sheenan, 
and Angela Masenti, as well as a 
good defensive power in pitcher 
Kelly Weaver, the Eagles should 
once again achieve a winning sea- 
son in 1992. 





OPPOSITE PAGE: SWINGS AWAY!!! 
Eagle's baseball provides entertainment at 
Shea Field. (Photo: Heide M. Bronke) 
THIS PAGE ABOVE: Eagle women won't 
be outdone by their male counterparts. 
(Photo: Tina Tine) DIRECTLY ABOVE: 
An effortful Eagle swing. (Photo: Tina 
Ting) LEFT: B.C. style high five. (Photo: 
Heide M. Bronke) 



Women's Softball 217 







Hit The Slopes! 



Last winter, while most of us only talked 
about how much we'd like to be skiing, 
the Ski Team was busy out on the slopes, 
taking advantage of every snowflake 
Mother Nature was willing to offer. Actu- 
ally, their season began as far back as Sep- 
tember when they began their dryland 
trairung. From there, coach BUI Toof's team 
spent a long, hard two weeks training at 
Waterville Valley in New Hampshire in 
order to prepare themselves for the often 
grueling and physically demanding season 
ahead. 

Things could not have started any better 
for the men's team. Behind Hans 
Schemmel, the top skiier in the Eastern Col- 
legiate Ski Conference, the Eagles began 
the season as a force to be reckoned with. In 
their first meet, at Berkshire East, the 
Eagles had four skiiers in the top ten in a 
field of 100, with Schemmel leading the 



way. Schemmel began the season healthy 
after undergoing reconstructive knee sur- 
gery in the spring. Through tremendous 
rehabilitation, he was able to pick up where 
he left off last year — as the premier skiier 
in the area. 

Schemmel was backed by a talented 
corps of skiiers. In fact, the team could not 
possibly have had more depth. Seniors 
Dave Bird and Ed Evangelista were real fac- 
tors for the Eagles all year long. Likewise, 
juruors Chris Yvars and Rick Vandyke and 
sophomore Jim Carolan were consistent 
top 20 contenders. The Eagles also have an 
extremely bright future. In only his first 
meet, freshman Tony Deleo turned in a re- 
markable performance, finishing third and 
fourth in the slalom and giant slalom. His 
classmate Brenden DonneUan is another 
sign of good things to come at the Heights. 

For the girl's team, things looked about 



ABOVE LEFT: Senior Janet Kane was a 
powerful asset to this season's squad. 
ABOVE RIGHT: Leadership was provided 
by senior captain Hans Schemmel. 
(AH photos — Hans Schemmel) 

as positive. Star sophomore Kirsten Mohill 
looked to top last year's heroics when she 
won the Eastern Regionals and was elected 
Scholar Athelete for her athletic and acad- 
emic achievements. Like Schemmel, she 
fought back after knee surgery in order to 
regain her position as frontrunner. Besides 
Mohill, the Eagles looked to captain Janet 
Kane and freshman Jill Cupoli to lead them 
to a strong finish in the Conference. Kane 
had outstanding results in the giant slalom 
at the Eastern Regionals last year and 
Cupoli proved herself a bona fide competi- 
tor early on. 

"I'm extremely proud of this team," 
notes Coach Toof. "We're unusually good 
in a number of different ways. No one has 
to be disciplined. No one has to be told to 
work hard. We're going to have to beat our- 
selves in order to do badly because we've 
got too much talent." 

Ski Team 219 



RIGHT: Junior Bill Powers 
promises to bring good things 
to the Eagles. 







Powers Ahead 



'uniors Lead Eagles 



Well, after the mass ex- 
odus of graduating 
seniors from last year's 
powerful squad, the Men's 
Tennis team could hardly 
expect a repeat of their past 
success. However, if their 
fall season is any indica- 
tion, this so-called rebuild- 
ing year has plenty to build 
on. Coach Marc Burns has 
plenty of young talent in 
his ranks to fill the voids 
left in his Big East cham- 
pionship squad. 
Number one on that 



chart is junior Bill Powers 
who filled the number one 
singles and, along with 
Alex Pitar, the number one 
doubles during the fall sea- 
son. Powers gained extra 
recognition by being the 
only Eagle to represent 
Boston College at the 
ITCA's in November. 
Coach Burns will certainly 
be looking to him to add 
leadership and strength to 
this young squad. 

Alex Pitar, at second 
singles, and fifth year 



senior David Driscoll, at 
third singles, round out 
the top of the roster, while 
juniors Kevin Connelly 
and Neil Giavara add 
much needed depth and 
support to the team. With 
only Driscoll leaving at the 
end of this year, the experi- 
ence gained from this sea- 
son will most certainly lead 
to a bright future for this 
young team and plenty 
more Big East champion- 
ships. 



220 Men's Tennis 




ABOVE: BREAK-point! 



Men's Tennis 221 



'I 



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* 




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ABOVE: Coach Gary Gildea had plenty of 
talent to work with this year. (Photo — 
Hans Schemmel) RIGHT: Senior Jennifer 
McEnroe (#12) helps out freshman Katie 
Farrell (#7). (Photo — Hans Schemmel) 



222 Women's Volleyball 





Sky High Spiking 



But Youthful Eagles Grounded 



LEFT Jennifer McEnroe looks on as her 
teammate goes for the block. (Photo — 
Hans Schemmel) 



"Doston College's Women's Vol- 
lUleyball team has a slow start that 
3nly foreshadowed a difficult sea- 
son. There were plenty of highlights 
:o the team with players such as 
>enior Maryellen MacKinnon, who 
ed the much improved defense. An 
offensively oriented team, the 
iagles had a tough time in the 
niddle of the season as they lost 
heir most powerful and consistent 
offensive threat in Allison Glovna. 
The loss of several other key players 



to injuries was also harmful to a po- 
tentially good season. Under the 
direction of Coach Gildea, the 
Eagles worked and played hard but 
were unable to overcome the many 
obstacles in their path. Next year's 
season should be a dramatic im- 
provement due to the many promis- 
ing freshmen who will add to the 
squad. Best of luck to graduating 
seniors Allison Glovna, Maryellen 
MacKinnon, and Jennifer McEnroe. 



Women's Volleyball 223 



Water Warriors 



Eagles Flirt with Top 20 




Often considered a 
sport that doesn't get 
much attention in the 
public eye, the Boston Col- 
lege Men's Water Polo 
Team ended a very suc- 
cessful season, being 
ranked in the Top Twenty 
of the country. The team 
has had to struggle 
throughout the year with a 
"large" disadvantage — a 
pool which is too small for 
the game. So while all prac- 
tices are held here at B.C. 
in an inadequately sized 
pool, the team must play 
every game, even Home 
ones, away. 
Second year coach Gerry 



Moss is very happy and 
confident of future success 
for the team. It was just re- 
cently that Men's Water 
Polo became a fully fund- 
ed. Division I Varsity 
sport. With this kind of 
backing. Moss is confident 
that the team will grow 
even stronger. 

Led by tri-captains 
Stephen Dore, Maarten 
KraaigVanger, and Leigh 
Utterback, along with 
twelve other strong, deter- 
mined players. Water Polo 
is now being recognized as 
a dominant sport as the 
Heights. 





OPPOSITE PAGE TOP: 
Senior Leigh Utterback 
throws to an open outlet. 
(Photo — Hans Schemmel) 
OPPOSITE PAGE BELOW: 
Coach Gerry Moss confers 
with his team. (Photo — 
Hans Schemmel) THIS 
PAGE: Goalie Stephen Dore 
intimidated opponents with 
his stone wall defense. 
(Photo — Hans Schemmel) 



I 



Water Polo 225 










I 




Scoreboard 




Us 


Then 





Michigan C 


J 





Virginia ] 
U. Mass t 


. 





) 


3 


Holy Cross ( 


} 


1 


Springfield :; 


) 





B.U. : 


) 


7 


Georgetown ( 


) 





Villanova 


, 


1 


p.c. : 


5 


1 


Syracuse C 


$ 





Brown 


I 





N.U. ^ 


I 





Maine ] 


L 





U. Conn. J 


) 


1 


Vermont ( 


) 


1 


Harvard i 


5 


3 


UNH ( 


) 


2 


VCU ( 


) 


2 


Duke : 


) 




stick to Stick 



Eagles Survive Tough Season 



A season full of more ups than 
downs, the B.C. field hockey 
team survived yet another trying year as 
they went 5-14-0, only a slight improve- 
ment over last season. Although gaining 
victories over Vermont, Georgetown, 
UNH, VCU, and Holy Cross, the team 
was still unable to achieve decisive wins 
over nationally ranked teams like 
Michigan, Virginia, and U. Mass. The 
future does look promising however, 
due to the large majority of strong fresh- 
men and sophomores that make up the 
bulk of the team. 



The Eagles biggest problem all season 
has been its lack of offensive power in 
the circle. Senior Joelle Kozma, last 
year's leading scorer, provided the 
young squad with strong leadership and 
remained a scoring threat all season with 
her powerful comer shot. Junior Allison 
Corradi, sophomore Ann Bissette, and 
freshman Jennifer Riedy also provided 
offensive strength, as did the fancy stick- 
work of freshman Julie Obear. 

One strength the team could count on 
was their defense, with the outstanding 
play of its two goalies, senior Mary 



Huang and junior Heather Welch. Both 
maintained strong stands in goal, often 
holding teams to only one or two goals in 
games where play was dominated by 
playing on the defensive. Other stand- 
outs on defense include junior sweeper 
Jennifer Mundono, and freshmen 
Meaghan Reilly and Jennifer Baker. 

With such young players experiencing 
lots of playing time, Head Coach Sharon 
Granese should have plenty to work 
with next season as they hope to move 
toward a wirming season. 




Spotlight 



Mary Huang will be leaving the 
Heights this year with a successful 
career in field hockey behind her. As 
goalie for the Eagles, Huang is admired 
for her work ethic on and off the field. 
Her strength in goal has earned her 
such accolades as 1990 Player of the 
Week and 1991 Boston Four All-Star 
Team. Off the field, Huang has main- 
tained the scholar side of the scholar- 
athlete profile, with her work as a clini- 
cal psychology major. 

Hailing from Belmont, Ma., Huang 
has been playing hockey for as long as 



she can remember. For her, there is 
nothing like the thrill and excitement 
of the game. A perfect example is the 
rigorous game against UVA which last- 
ed into double overtime, with Huang 
contributing twenty saves. Although 
the team lost, she believes that 
"pushing yourself and going beyond 
your limitations," is what is always im- 
portant. After B.C., she hopes to con- 
tinue in field hockey, either as a coach, 
or as a player in a recreational league. 
With her strong ambition and attitude 
of life, her future is sure to be a success . 



TOP LEFT: Coach Granese and 
her team discuss strategy dur- 
ing halftime. 
BOTTOM LEFT: Lady Eagles 

£0 for goal against Virginia. 
EFT: Moving up the sidelines, 
the Eagles break out of their de- 
fensive end. 



Field Hockey 227 



Water Rats 



mm 



Eagles Streamline The Shores 



For the Men's and Women's crew 
teams, lack of funding has not pre- 
vented them from growing and growing 
and growing. Headed by Coach John 
Ciovacco, with the help of Men's Varsity 
coach, Peter Olrich and Women's Var- 
sity coach, Dave O'Neil (B.C. '91), this is 
one club team that has survived. Last 
spring, the acquisition of a boathouse 
from La Salle College gave B.C.'s pro- 
gram a home, but already this home has 
become too small. 

For both the men's and women's 
teams, the fall Head season has proven 
to be a time of building. Racing in long 
distance events against high caliber 



teams such as Harvard, the Head experi- 
ence prepares them for the Spring. Dur- 
ing the Head of the Charles, the 
Women's 8 placed sixth in a field of 
twenty-eight. 

Spring is the time when sprints take 
place against teams of club caliber. The 
culmination of the season comes in the 
Dad Vail Regatta in Philadelphia, PA, 
where last year's Men's 4 placed fifth 
overall and the Women's 8 came in 
twelfth. With a squad full of juniors, the 
next couple of years should prove to be 
very rewarding for this powerful club 
sport. 




RIGHT: Crew members 
share a smile during practice. 



228 Crew 





LEFT: Boathouse Blues — a 
crew member's work is never 
done. (Photo: Cheryl Sim- 
rany) BOTTOM LEFT: Eagle 
Crew is known for its dedica- 
ted members. (Photo: Tina 
Ting) BELOW: B.C. scull 
ready for action!!! (Photo: 
Anne Pavlides) 





m 


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Crew 229 






Ups and Downs 



Women Ride Roller Coaster 



The Boston College Women's 
Soccer team was definitely on a 
roll this season (a roller coaster that 
is). With losses followed by victories 
again and again, the Eagles finally 
ended their season with a .500 rec- 
ord. Once again, like many Eagle 
teams this season, numerous fresh- 
men started and led the campaign 
toward victory. Coach Theresa 
Bonorden was very impressed with 
her young team's performance. The 
youth movement that has worked 
for her this season has added a fresh 
feel to the team with their many 
hard played games. In fact, this year 
there was only one senior starter. 
Under the command of senior Stacie 
Smith, the team beat such power- 
house opponents as Dartmouth (2- 



1) and notorious arch rival. Holy 
Cross (3-0). 

There were numerous injuries 
this season that could have prevent- 
ed the Eagles from becoming a victo- 
rious team. In the Holy Cross 
match, Rachel Sheriden left the 
game with a broken arm early in the 
first half. Nonetheless, the Eagles 
maintained their desire to win, and 
proved themselves adept at work- 
ing under any conditions. In fact. 
Coach Bonorden proudly maintains 
that the juniors and sophomores 
have provided the guidance and 
discipline necessary to make a 
winning team. For the Lady Eagles, 
all the ingredients were there for a 
winning season. 




Spotlight 




A native of Fur- 
long, Pen- 
nsylvania, Stacie 
Smith is a con- 
trolled player both 
on and off the 
field. As midfield- 
er on the Women's 
Soccer team for 
four years, she has 
managed to find a 
balance between 
academics, athlet- 
ics and the social scene. Such discipline can 
be credited to her family. Smith says her 
parents have been incredibly supportive, 
and have attended every game. For Stacie, 
it was always great to have her own 
"personal cheering squad." 

She has contributed to B.C. off the field 
as well as on. As an A&S Communications 
major, Smith used her abilities by writing 
for The Heights, doing sports news for 
WZBC, and reporting for Eagle Eyewitness 
News. In the future, she sees herself as a 
sportscaster for a major television network. 
As she leaves B . C . , her advice to others is to 
make a commitment to something, but al- 
ways remember that academics come first. 



Scoreboard 



Us 

1 Keene State 

Hartford 5 

1 James Madison 4 
4 Stony Brook 1 
3 Holy Cross 

2 St. John's 1 
Conneticut 1 

3 Harvard 1 
2 Dartmouth 1 
2 Providence 3 
Vermont 2 

4 Penn State (OT) 3 
Salem State 
2 Brown 
UNH 1 



LEFT: Senior Stacie Smith (#7) led her 
teammates with brilliant play. (Photo — 
Hans Schemmel) 

Women's Soccer 231 




232 Men's Basketball 




New And Improved 



B.C. Battles In The BIG EAST 



ABOVE: A new and im- 
proved Eagle team shocked 
competitors with BIG wins 
against the likes of Seton Hall 
and Miami. (All photos — 
Paul Hezel). 



It wasn't hard of course. In fact, 
it would have been hard not 
to. After a nineteen game losing 
streak in the BIG EAST competi- 
tion beginning last season, any- 
thing would have been an im- 
provement. Last year's squad, 
featuring four starting fresh- 
men, did gain one important 
thing however, despite the 
losses — experience. With the 
return of sophomores Malcom 
Huckaby, Howard Eisley, 
Gerrod Abram, and this year's 
co-captain Billy Curley, all of 
whom saw plenty of tough ac- 
tion as freshmen, the Eagles 
have become serious BIG EAST 
contenders. 

The season started out on the 
right foot as the Eagles went 7-0 
in strong showings against 
UNH, Harvard, Brown, Holy 
Cross, and Hofstra. Trouble set 
in once again however when, 
faced with BIG EAST play, B.C. 
fell in close decisions to No. 22 
Syracuse, No. 17 St. John's, No. 
13 Seton Hall, and Villanova. 



With the continued defensive 
pressure applied to star Billy 
Curley, it was necessary for 
others to step forward with the 
scoring. 

The call for points was an- 
swered decisively by Abram, 
Huckaby and Eisley and things 
really began to turn around, 
posting big wins against Provid- 
ence, Seton Hall, and Miami. All 
three games came down to the 
final seconds, with Abram com- 
ing through in the clutch with 
the final shot. In addition to a 
strong three-point shooting per- 
centage, the team combined 
their efforts with powerful, 
shut-down defense, causing 
their opponents costly turn- 
overs. This enabled the Eagles to 
overcome deficits and regain 
control of close games. 

Another welcomed and well- 
needed addition this season was 
the return of a healthy Dave 
Hinton, a junior who displayed 
signs of great promise his fresh- 



man year but who struggled 
with injuries all last season. 
Coupled with fellow Big Man 
Curley, Hinton added the ad- 
ditional height that B.C. was 
lacking under the basket. His 
continued strong presence on 
the court was key to the Eagles 
success. 

B.C. says goodbye to two 
highly talented players in co- 
captain Willie Foley and Corey 
Jackson. Jackson was an explo- 
sive power off the bench, scor- 
ing key baskets, while Foley, 
with his determined and intense 
work ethic, added depth as well 
as badly needed leadership on 
and off the court. 

With the return of almost all 
their key players next season, as 
well as seasoned freshmen 
Kevin Hrobowski, Derek Jack- 
son, Marc Molinsky, Terry 
Rountree and Wayne Williams, 
the Eagles should continue their 
upward movement to become a 
BIG EAST powerhouse. 



Men's Basketball 233 




ABOVE: Eagle basketball started off with a 
bang in a head-to-head match up against 
the Canadian Olympic team. 
RIGHT: Coach O'Bnen expects BIG things 
from sophomore center Bui Curley. 
FAR RIGHT: The B.C. fast break was pow- 
erful in their opener with Canada. (All 
photos — Cheryl Simrany) 



234 Men's Basketball 






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LEFT: Curley's height has been a big asset 
to the team. 

BELOW: B.C. is sure to out-muscle a lot of 
teams this year. 

BOTTOM LEFT: When it comes to Bill 
Curley's play, the sky is the limit. 
BOTTOM MIDDLE: B.C.'s defense con- 
tinued to be a strong point. 
BOTTOM RIGHT: Team work is necessary 
if B.C. wants to be a Big East competitor. 





HHH 






V^'^^M 




Men's Basketball 235 



RIGHT: Sophomore Malcolm Huckaby 
(#12) helped the Eagles to jump out to a 7-0 
start. 

BELOW RIGHT: B.C. plowed over all ob- 
stacles in their search to become a BIG 
EAST force. 
(All photos — Paul J. Hezel) 




Seriior forward Corey 
Jacksor\ feels he has 
gained much academically 
and personally from his 
years at B.C. His various 
associations with the 
people he has encoun- 
tered, especially his 
player-coach relationship, 
have helped to form Jack- 
son as a complete indi- 
vidual. 

His most memorable ex- 
perience was the team's 
win against Syracuse dur- 
ing his freshman year that 
made him realize "what college basketball was all about — 
excitement." Excelling at the BIG EAST conference, one of 
the best and toughest conference, would prove to Corey 
that he could excel at anything. 

Among his greatest accomplishments at B.C. are winning 
the MVP in the B.C. Classic, and playing for the All- 
Tournament Team. Off -court, Jackson has represented B.C. 
at the "BIG EAST Atheletes Care," where athletes visit 
children in inner city schools. Jackson feels that he received 
tremendous support from his mother. Perhaps his greatest 
source of encouragement has been his one-year old daugh- 
ter Ebonee. "Since she's been born, there is so much more to 
Uve for." 





236 Men's Basketball 



^s^^SSS^^S^ 



WGHT: Sophomore Howard Eisley, sur- 
rounded by Canadian opposition, gets 
ready to make his move. 
BELOW: Eisley jumps to victory. 
BELOW RIGHT: Kevin Hrobowski stands 
guard against the Canadian invasion. 






RIGHT: A slam dunk for #22 Corey Jackson 
as the Canadians look on virith awe. 
FAR RIGHT: Coach Jim O'Brien prays for 
an Eagle victory. (All photos — Cheryl Sim- 
grany) 



238 Men's Basketball 




: > 




-'/!' 



LEFT: Gerred Abram jumps for joy in antic- 
ipation of a victorious season for the Eagles. 
BELOW: Yet another basket for the boys at 
B.C. 




W 



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Men's Basketball 239 









Tough Enough 






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Men's Rugby Scrum It Up 




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I great year for all three The highlight of the men's ever, and came away with the 
Xlines, the Men's Rugby season would have to be the own "sweep" as the A,B, and 
m achieved a winning sea- Eagles' win over arch-rival Holy lines all walked away with vict 
\, culminating with a show- Cross. This rivalry is so intense ries. 

in the New England Tourna- that days before the game, the Although graduating nine e 
nt, their first in four years. B.C. players all received letters cellent seniors from this yeai 
i by senior co-captains Al from Holy Cross with the threat winning squad, Coach Ken Da 
Carthy and Brian Walters, that they were going to get is not worried. With mar 
5 club team is finally getting "swept" in the match, and not strong juniors on the A line, ar 

recognition it deserves. Evi- accomplish a single victory, an equally powerful B line, ne 
-ice of this can be seen at any Holy Cross even brought season should be just as excitii 
? of their well-attended night brooms to the game, just for the for the B.C. Rugby fans, 
nes on Shea Field. occasion. B.C. took over how- 


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Lady Ruggers Go National 



rhe Boston College 
Women's Rugby Team 
as a lot to brag about this 
eason. Coming off an 
; mazing showing last sea- 
■on (ranked #2 after losing 
' grueling game to Air 
iorce), thev came back at 
■ill tilt, beating Air Force 
nis fall during the regular 
i?ason. This placed them 
1 the #1 slot. This year 
, dth their stellar perform- 
■nce, the Lady Eagles are 
:n their way to the Nat- 
)nals again in May, after 
ecoming East Coast 
hamps for the third 
Taight season. 
All nine East Coast All- 



Stars from last year's squad 
returned to lead the team. 
Under the command of co- 
captains Cathy Darrow 
and Laura Kiley, and aided 
by Heather Smith, Kathy 
Mendez, and Christine 
Senaldi, the team prides 
itself on its philosophy of 
unity. The team that wins 
together, loses together. 
The fact that they don't 
lose doesn't hurt much 
though. With a strong core 
of juniors and sophom- 
ores, victory seems to be 
the norm rather than the 
exception here, and the 
Eagles are looking forward 
to another victorious season. 




BELOW RIGHT: Danny Grace comes up for air as B.C. wins the 
"Scrum" against Brown. (Photo — Bill Meehan) BOTTOM: The 
women's team loosens up before a tough match against U Conn. 
(Photo— Bill Meehan) BELOW: Ahh, the graceful art of Rugby. 
Danny Grace with the tackle. (Photo — Bill Meehan) OPPOSITE 
PAGE: Adios to senior members of the men's team. (Photo — 
Cheryl Simrany) 




, .. ...... ,..,..ve 

Rugby 241 




ABOVE: B.C. reached for 
help from Sarah Behn this 
year. (Photo — Paul J. Hezel) 



Onward and Upward 



Lady Eagles Fight Back 



After a disappointing 1990-91 
season, the Lady Eagles 
were counting on this year to be 
a vast improvement. However, 
these new hopes were soon 
stalled with the loss of three 
players early in the season, 
along with the loss of last year's 
star player, Carla Wenger. Yet 
this team is nothing if not deter- 
mined. Coach Mar go Plotzke 
added two new walk-ons for this 
season, Marcee Owens and 
Jermifer Cronin. 



As in past years, the main 
source of strength for the team 
comes from Sarah Behn. This 
season, Behn has been averag- 
ing 28.4 points a game, making 
her the second in the nation and 
first in the BIG EAST. Two other 
vital players are freshmen 
guards Joan Gallagher and Lori 
Kasten, filling in for gaps left by 
the loss of Wenger and Kelli 
Stahl. 

Returning sophomore Kerry 
Curran started every game last 



year and was chosen for the BIG 
EAST All-Rookie Team. Averag- 
ing seventeen points a game, 
she has provided the team with i 
much needed leadership. Fi- 
nally, senior captain Jennifei 
Leddy has also formed a strong 
foundation for the team and has ' 
led them with her determination 
and strength. 

With a majority of the players 
returning next season, things 
look a bit brighter for the squad. 




242 Women's Basketball 







^^. 




Spotlight 



W;;: 



'omen's basketball at B.C. will 
^e losing a truly dedicated 
player when Jennifer Leddy gradu- 
ates this spring. For four years, Jenny 
has been dashing about BIG EAST 
courts, her concentration intense and 
her tongue sticking out — a familiar sight to all Lady Eagles' 
fans. 

Although heavily recruited by several universities, Jenny 
came to B.C. for the combination of academics, location, and of 
course, the BIG EAST status. She doesn't seem to regret her 
choice, and in fact, stresses that she has formed many friend- 
ships with her fellow teammates and that they are close on and 
off the court. 

In her B.C. career, Jennv has earned several honors. Last 
season, she was named the BIG EAST Academic All-Star, 
while this summer she traveled to Canada with the BIG EAST 
.A.Il-Star Traveling team. We wish her the best of luck in the 
future. 






OPPOSITE PAGE: Strong de- 
fense sets B.C. opponents back a 
step this season. 
ABOVE: The sky was the limit 
for the Lady Eagles 
LEFT: Junior, Sarah Behn, was 
tough on the boards and dis- 
played a gentle scoring touch 
this year. 
(All photos — Paul J. Hezel) 



Women's Basketball 245 




Let's face it. This past year BC athletics were given a 
shot in the arm. Where did the pep rallies come 
from? How about the chances to shoot baskets for a free 
tuition? What about THE MIAMI GAME? Somebody, 
somewhere was behind all of this. But who? It's actually 
quite simple. The man pumping all of the life into our 
athletic programs was BC's new athletic director, Chet 
Gladchuck. 

Since 1957, Boston College athletics had been run 
under the auspices of one man. Bill Flynn. Under his 
leadership, BC experienced the biggest growth period in 
its history. Our school gained national recognition for 
competing at the highest level both academically and 
athletically. But the 1900' s bring new challenges to this 
institution and Chet Gladchuck gives Boston College 
athletics a definite advantage. 

Boston College has played a major role in Gladchuck' s 
life. His father, Chet Gladchuck, Sr., was one of the best 
football players ever to play at the Heights. As a result, 
Chet was exposed very early in life to what BC is all about 
Cladchuck went on to graduate form BC's School of 
Management in 1972 and starred as a center out on the 
5rid iron, earning the "Unsung Hero" football award. 
tie later went on to marry his college sweetheart, BC 
zheerleading captain Kathy Blunt. 

Gladchuck obtained his master's degree in sports 

administration from the Uriiversity of Massachusetts — 

, \mherst in 1974 and then remained there as an athletic 

j idministrator tmtil 1985. From there he was hired as 



Chet Gladchuck 



The Next Generation 



Syracuse's Director of Athletics before becoming the Di- 
rector of Intercollegiate Athletics at Tulane. 

Now, twenty-five years later, he is back at BC and cold 
not be happier. But his first year was anything but easy. 
Only three weeks into his tenure, he named Tom 
Coughlin as BC's new head football coach. Gladchuck 
then witnessed the forming of the new Big East football 
conference, an event that marked the beginning of a new 
era in college football. Then he was faced with the critical 
job of hiring the successor of Len Ceglarski, college 
hockey's winningest coach. 

But the new athletic director seemed to take each of 
these decisions in stride. This is because he has confi- 
dence in his ability to overcome challenges and make the 
right choices. Before coming to BC, he spent three years 
at Tulane University and virtually turned their athletic 
program around. 

When he arrived, a point-shaving scandal had ended 
the basketball program and the school was practically 
without any athletic facilities. Gladchuck planned and 
implemented the construction of a 76,000 square-foot 
athletic center, baseball stadium, track and tennis com- 
plex, and the renovation of the school's basketball arena. 
He also reinstate Tulane's Division I basketball program. 
Most importantly, though, he gave Tulane's students a 
sense of pride in their sports programs that they hadn't 
had in 40 years. 

"The decision to leave Tulane was probably the har- 
dest decision I've ever had to make," said Gladchuck. "I 
had put so much of my heart into that university that it 
was very tough for me and my family to leave. But it was 
really the reaction by the people of New Orlean's that 
made me decide. They realized that being BC's athletic 
director was a dream come true for me, and they sup- 
ported me in every way. They sent me off with absolu- 
tely no hard feelings at all, only a profound sense of ap- 
preciation for what I had accomplished there." 

Behind Gladchuck, Boston College is positioned ex- 
tremely well to be viewed as a model institution. Accord- 
ing to Gladchuck, "More restrictive NCAA legislation, 
institutional control, and emphasis on graduation rates 
are examples of focal points beginning to evolve on the 
national front. BC has been subscribing to these guide- 
lines for years. For example, we'll be graduating 94.6% of 
our athletes this year. Basically, Boston College is what 
division I athletics are all about: having high academic 
standards, recruiting quality student athletes, and care- 
fully integrating our goals with the goals of this uni- 
versity." 
(Photo — Paul J. Hezel) 



r 



Chet Gladchuck 247 



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248 Perspectives 



PERSPECTIVES 



7-fi 



m 




Lj ives of great people all 
remind us 

We can make our lives sublime 
And, departing, leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of Time. 

~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 



Perspectives 249 



While most students spend their four 
years at Boston College merely at- 
tempting to move from one year to the 
next with acceptable grades, there are 
those who have realized early in their 
college education that campus life has 
so much more to offer. Jackqueline 
McLean is one of those people. Since 
freshman year, she has been involved 
in numerous activities including 
Project 2000, the Intercultural Council, 
Voices of Imani, and the Black Family 
Weekend to name only a few. 

At present, Jackqueline feels her most 
rewarding role here at Boston College 



is serving as Vice President for 
AHANA Affairs. This position al- 
lows her to participate in the fight to 
unify groups on campus, a goal she 
has had since coming here in the fall of 
1988. She believes that the lectures, 
forums, and retreats which her office 
organizes are the first step towards 
group cohesion since these events help 
both majority and minority students 
to better relate with each other. Ac- 
cording to Jackqueline, only by voic- 
ing and sharing opinions can people 
rid themselves of the "little prejudices 
and stereotypes" that each one of us 



carries, perhaps without even realiz-j 
ing that we are doing so. 

It is for the purpose of bringing 
awareness into the Boston College, 
community that Jackqueline began^ 
participating in AHANA events. She 



Jackqueline McLean 



Heide M. Bronke 




"TTiis is the time to 



explore and learn... 



seize that moment, 



and make the best of it." 



1 



remembers vividly that when she 
came to Chestnut Hill, her first though! 
was, "I, as an individual, can't make a 
difference; but if someone doesn't, 
who will?" Right then, Jackqueline 
decided that she alone could produce 
changes, but she also is intelligent 
enough to perceive that success will 
come sooner through group effort, so 
she now uses her involvement to alter 
society's views as best she can. 

Not surprisingly, Jackqueline en- 
courages participation in extracur- 
ricular activities as she feels that such 
activities can contribute to one of the 
most important experiences of a col- 
lege education. By looking outside 
one's previous horizons, each student 
becomes more aware of the world, 
and can discover many new opportu- 
nities unavailable after graduation. 
She states that this is a once in a life- 
time chance, yet too many students do 
not take the time to investigate BC's 
offerings. "Apathy... it's sad. This is 
the time to explore and learn.. .seize 
that moment, and make the best of it." 



250 Perspectives 



Every week an entirely new issue of 

7/t' Heights appears as if by magic at 

'arious spots all over campus. But in 

ruth, magic has very little to do with 

t. The publication of Boston College's 

\^eekly newspaper is the result of a 

taff of dedicated individuals, one of 

N'hom is Scott Matarese - Managing 

iditor of the paper. 

Scott began working for The Heights 

uring his sophomore year. His in- 

oh'ement in the newspaper arose 

rom watching a full new issue arrive 

ach week like clockwork. He says, 

The Heights was something I looked 

Drward to every week. It was very 

/ell done, and I was impressed that 

•eople put so much of their energy 

ito the paper, knowing that when 

ine issue was finished, it was time to 

egin all over again." 

Scott \vas askeci to join the staff by a 

riend of his who was then Managing 

iditor, a title he has since inherited. 

'et this position did not come imme- 

iately. In the three years he has been 

dth the paper, Scott has succeeded in 

^'orking liis way up the hierarchy from 

j)illing to Ws current position. As 



files, and handles important last 
minute changes in orcier to produce 
yet another fine edition of The Heights. 
On top of these responsibilities, Scott 
must also balance his class assign- 
ments with time spent at The Heights. 
Common sense and organization are 
the keys in Scott's ability to manage 
his time wisely. On Saturdays, when 
his work at the paper is basically fin- 
ished, he goes home - not to relax, but 
to begin homework. Having worked 
at Tlie Heiglits for three years, Scott has 
managed to establish a loose time 
schedule, which ideally leaves the 



weekends open for academics. How- 
ever, this schedule does not always 
work. Running the business side of 
the newspaper has certainly shown 
Scott that life is full of little surprises 
which are often unwelcome in addition 
to being unexpected. 

With such a large workload, Scott 
stresses that he could not do it alone. 
Of the other staff members he says, 
"It's a great team, and I'm just one of 
the players." This may be so, but no 
one could deny that he is one of the 
most valuable of players. 



f'Tl-K 



It's a great team, 



and I'm just one 



of the players." 



vlanaging Editor, Scott is responsible 
or everything to do with the paper's 
inances, a tall order since the paper is 
inancially independent. His diverse 
asks include record keeping, billing, 
budgeting, and ordering supphes. Yet 
lis most vital contribution to the pa- 
:>er is in the area of advertising. Every 
veek this senior Marketing major 
ipeaks vAiYv advertisers, updates the 

L 



Scott Matarese 



Heide M. Bronke 




Perspectives 251 




situations. 

In addition to large amounts of fu: 
and stress, Kara also feels that 'Heabag 



MT+r 



It's taught me how to 



face a challenge, and 



how to relate to people 



on a different level." 



C hLT\'l bimran\' 



Kara McNamara 



In the fall of 1988, at two in the 
morning, Kara McNamara was rudely 
awakened by a loud knocking. When 
she opened the door, several people 
rushed in and immediately began 
wrapping her in toilet paper. That 
night, Kara McNamara became an 
official member of 'My Mother's 
Fleabag.' 

Most people watch this popular 
improv comedy troupe with awe, 
thinking, "I could never do that." Kara 
admits that she thought this at first 
too, but soon realized that the secret 
lies in simply being oneself. Accord- 
ing to Kara, the humor comes from 



spontaneity and open-mindedness 
rather than planned routines. "Don't 
do what you think the crowd will 
think is funny. Trust the first thing 
that comes into your head." 

As strange as it may sound, the 
members of 'My Mother's Fleabag' 
meet for rehearsal three times a week. 
But what can one do to prepare for the 
unexpected? Obviously, there is no 
set formula, but rehearsals can make 
the cast members more confident in 
their abilities by teaching them to think 
on their feet. This is done by having 
those members not in a particular skit 
act as an audience, firing off tough 



has given her a fresh view of life. "It's 
taught me how to face a challenge 
and how to relate to people on a differ 
ent level." What else has she gainec 
from this unique experience? Creativ 
ity, weirdness, and surprisingly - trust 
Improv comedy, in Kara's opinion 
requires that the performers have im 
plicit faith in their fellow players 
When this quality is present, Kara say; 
that performing on stage is just Iik( 
playing around with her best friends 
only there is an audience watching. 
In the future, Kara plans to be facing 
an audience of a different sort - a class 
room filled with bright, open faces 
Yet here again, even in her career goals 
Kara sets challenges for herself. Sht 
hopes to teach in a inner city school 
where she feels her talents could bt 
better employed. Prior to her taking 
up the life of a teacher, Kara is looking 
into volunteer programs such as the 
JVC or VISTA; so the world has cer- 
tainly not seen the last of Kara 
McNamara. 



252 Perspectives 



Possibly one of the most visible 
"lembers of the Class of 1992 is Ed 
mith, a double major in Theater Arts 
nd English. During his four years at 
oston College, Ed has denionstrated 
is talents in such organizations as the 
"ontemporary Theater, the Univer- 
it^' Theater, Chorale, and this year as 
resident of the Dramatics Society, 
d is best kiiown for his brilliant per- 
-irmances in Mother Courage and Her 
'liildrcii, Free to Be You ami Mc, anci 
'oyotc Ugh/, to name only a few of his 
le\'en shows. 

\'et there is much more to Ed than 

"le polished acting one sees on stage. 

I great deal of time and dedication go 

ito every one of his performances. 

e estimates that the average show 

quires six weeks of practice, with 

jst members rehearsing twenty hours 

week for the first four weeks, and 



"...to be a good actor, 



you have to have your 



eyes and ears open to 



the world around you." 



utting in even more time during the 
ist two weeks before the actual per- 
^rmance. Of the long hours, Ed says 
lat, "It's a big expense of time and 
nergy, but I wouldn't do it if I didn't 
)ve it." 

In fact, Ed loves it so much that he 
.aims to rarely get stagefright any- 
"lore. Now, rather than getting ner- 
ous, he feels excited, and is anxious 
) put all those weeks of practice to the 
nal test. He says that acting simply 







'A 






Tina Ting 



Ed Smith 



'feels right'. According to Ed, one can 
learn a lot about life - and a lot about 
the world through acting. He states, 
"You can get very involved inside a 
theater; but to be a good actor, you 
have to have your eyes and ears open 
to the world around you. You need to 
notice details and reproduce them." 
Ed's ability to reproduce details also 
proves beneficial in another one of his 
many talents - writing. Readers of 
Stylus will soon see a new side to Ed 
when one of his poems is published in 
the Spring edition. But of course, 
being the multi-faceted person that 
he is, Ed enjoys writing in other genres 



besides poetry. He is particularly fond 
of composing plays, where he is able 
to use his acting skills to best advan- 
tage. 

In the future, Ed would like to con- 
tinue in the field of acting, though he 
adds that writing will still remain 
central to his life as well. He may even 
wish to extend his talents into the field 
of directing, as he did in a Dr. Seuss 
benefit for pediatric AIDS research. 
When asked why he decided to take 
on this particular project, he said, "It's 
my way of giving back the gifts I've 
been given, to do some good for oth- 
ers." 



Perspectives 253 



TJ. Martinez serves as the link 
which joins the students and faculty 
of Boston College. Serving as Vice 
President of Student Affairs and the 
student representative to the Board of 
Trustees, T.J. researches student life as 
well as the extent of student partici- 
pation in campus activities. Socially, 
his department co-sponsors the 
"Breaking the Barriers Ball," which 
brings trustees, administration and 
students together to celebrate "the 
successes of Boston College and the 
spirit of Christmas." Although ac- 
tivities like this seek to integrate stu- 
dents and administration, T.J. is most 



concerned with the "quaUty of student 
life." 

His primary concern today is a 
Student Center, one which would al- 
low the students of Boston College to 
grow socially within the University. 
While Boston College is rising aca- 
demically, T.J. believes that the qual- 
ity of student life has not greatly im- 
proved. This belief is grounded on the 
fact that many students leave campus 
at night or on weekends because the 
University fails to provide a physical 
establishment which could gather 
students in a social setting. Thus, T.J. 
articulates that he would "spearhead a 



T.J. Martinez 



Cheryl Simrany 




\%*^ 




University Center because. ..if BC 
wants to compete with other Univer- 
sities, we must provide an academi- 
cally and socially integrated campus." ^ 
With all the work that T.J. does as a 
member of UGBC, he still carries a full 
workload as a double major in Politi- 
cal Science and Communications. 

According to T.J., politics and the 
media have a symbiotic relationship 
in which the media brings political 
events to life, making them seem far 
more real than mere words on a page. 
Moreover, the media allows the 
American people to relate to national 
figures, not only as role models but 
also as equals. "Pubhcity is not bad," 
says T.J. It can be a useful device from 
which the American people get a fla- 
vor of United States politics, and from 
this they can recognize the similarities 
between the national and local scenes. 
Once people begin to realize that they, 
too, can affect change, political par- 
ticipation will grow and society wiU 
strengthen. Knowing this, students 



"...ifBC wants to 
compete with other 



universities, we must 



provide an academically 
and socially integrated 



campus. 



should begin to realize how much; 
influence they can have at Boston Col- 
lege, and should use this power to 
improve student life, just as T.J. 
Martinez is attempting to do. 



254 Perspectives 



The vastness of Boston College es- 
apes most of us, until we see Michelle 
^.badia walking from McElrov to 
)'NeilI. Born with cataracts and com- 
iletelv blinded by the age of six, 
dichelle came to Boston College de- 



"Pity is not the 

attitude we welcome, 

but a sense of 

equality of 
people, because 
we are people.^' 



irmined to overcome the obstacle of 
le physical size of the campus, 
lichelle's desire to attend BC 
temnied froni the University's repu- 
ible name and the facilities it pro- 
ides - facilities which help her to 
"laintain a sense of independence. 

Michelle has not only managed to 
vercome her disability, but she has 
ffectively carried herself into the 
salm of musical expression. As a 
"lember of the Boston College Cho- 
ale and the Music Ministry, Michelle 
.illingly shares her brilliant talent. 
ler voice fills the hearts of many, and 
^gether with her expertise on the 
uitar, Michelle sparks emotions 
,'here none were known to exist. Her 
lusical gift has taken her to West 
oxburv, where she celebrates mass 
.'ith the Hispanic community, and to 
Jiode Island, where she transfixed 
le audience during a brilhant solo 
erformed in Tales Of Wonder, a mu- 
ical which journeys through time 
•om the birth of creation to the cru- 
iiixion of Christ. 
Currently, Michelle is balancing her 




Cheryl Simrany 



Michelle Abadia 



options. She is unsure whether or not 
to attend a graduate program in 
French Literature, or to pursue a 
career in opera. Whichever choice she 
makes, Michelle has certainly dis- 
played diligence and courage. Her 
persistence is an incredible example 
of the idea expressed in The Sound Of 
Music: "when God closes a door, 
somewhere He opens a window." 

Blindness, according to Michelle, 
has made her a more responsible in- 
dividual. She realistically realizes that 
she must accommodate herself to a 
sighted world. Yet she admits that the 
friendships she cultivates on campus 



strengthen her ability to combat ig- 
norance in society. Through such 
support at Boston College, Michelle is 
inspired and motivated to keep 
overcoming the many obstacles of life, 
and to not give up because of her 
single limitation. Michelle's message 
to the 'seeing world' is that handi- 
capped people are "people who 
struggle and teach the world many 
things. Sometimes people forget who 
you are and look down on you. Pity is 
not the attitude we welcome, but a 
sense of equality of people, because 
we are people." 



Perspectives 255 




Heide M. Bronke 



Kim Bahs 



Many people at Boston College refer 
to the School of Management as the 
School of Money, believing that ev- 
eryone in SOM is a die-hard capitalist. 
Kim Bahs, a senior in the SOM Honors 
Program and president of Commu- 
nity Service, is helping to change this 
interpretation. 

Kim's commitment to volunteering 
began due to a lack of coordination, 
opportunities, and information in the 
area of volunteer services here at Bos- 
ton College. She was also upset by the 
one-sided view of life to which many 
in the School of Management sub- 



scribe. In her opinion, volunteering 
can help contribute to the building of 
a well-rounded character. 

For this reason, Kim tries to offer a 
variety of activities in order to satisfy 
a wide range of student interests, as 
well as to accommodate each person's 
busy schedule. In this way, volunteer 
opportunities become available to as 
many people as possible. 

Some of the activities Kim oversees 
are meals at Haley House, painting at 
the Pine Street Inn, and various events 
at the Campus School. The Commu- 
nity Service group also provided free 



tutoring before the new Development 
Center came to Boston College. 

This year, several new projects were 
offered. Working closely with Dean 
Bowditch, Kim organized a trip to the 
Community Gardens in Weston, ^ 
place run by Greenpeace. The particiJ 
pating volunteers collected two tons 
of fresh foods in a Harvest for Hungei 



"Volunteering creates 



a sense of community 



and a commitment to 



service which one can 



carry into the real world." 



campaign; the food was donated t( 
the Boston Food Bank, another orga 
nization which Kim's group has aide( 
in the past. 

Kim stresses the fact that, "you can' 
just expect people to go - you've got t( 
be a leader." So, by setting an example 
Kim is helping other School of Man 
agement students learn that there i 
more to life at Boston College thai 
academics. Volunteering time anc 
energy, according to Kim, "creates 
sense of community and a commit 
ment to service which one can carr 
into the real world." 

At present, Kim is unsure of wha 
the real world will bring, however 
one thing is certain - at least part o 
Kim's time will be spent volunteering 



256 Perspectives 



Professors Donald Hafner and 
Kishore Mandhyan seem to have a 
'following' at Boston College. Their 
expertise, combined with an effective 
teaching style and approachable na- 
ture, seems to attract political science 
majors like bees to honey. 

After having taken two years off 
from teaching to work for the Carter 
administration on arms control, 
Hafner says he carried away a lesson 
in politics. Professor Hafner recog- 
nizes that it is possible to "get a good 
deal of public spiritedness out of 
people, but vou have to let them know 
that ^vhat they are doing is impor- 
tant." Professor Mandhyan, involved 
with the Indian bureaucracy, recog- 
nizes that those involved in the politi- 
cal process must "necessarily have 
time to reflect and detach themselves 
from power" before attempting to 
enter the chaos of government. 

Currently, Professor Hafner's re- 
search interests are focused on look- 
ins; ahead to future issues in Pacific 
Security, and looking back at the les- 
sons of the Vietnam War. Professor 
Mandhyan is working on a paper for 
the UN Conference on Environment 



"Collectively, 



it is possible 



to affect change." 



and Development, in which he ex- 
plores themes on the relationship of 
the State and environment in India. 
However busv thev seem to be, both 
Professors Mandhyan and Hafner 
have time to share their experiences 
inside and outside the classroom. 
Hafner says that teaching his courses 



on "National Security Policy" and 
"America Foreign Policy" presents real 
challenges because the world is in 
such turmoil and change. So through 
insightful anci challenging discus- 
sions, he tries to 'seize the moment', 
using contemporary events as a lever 
to get at deeper and enduring issues. 
Professor Mandhyan, teaching "The 
Challenge of World Hunger" and 
"Comparative Politics of South Asia", 
says that he tries to combine the "prac- 
tical, ethical, and conceptual" when 
trying to infect 'real life' into teaching 
theoretical courses. 

With all the frustration existing in 
our world today, Hafner and 



Mandhyan remind us that although 
each of us cannot change the world 
independently, we should "remem- 
ber that while we make our own life 
a testament to what we believe in, we 
can hope that there are others at the 
far corners of the world who are also 
trying to make things better - and 
collectively it is possible to affect 
change." For those interested in 
politics, these professors enthusiasti- 
cally remind us that this is our society 
and our government, and, "in order 
for real change to occur, we must 
change both ourselves and the gov- 
ernment which represents us." 



Professors Mandhyan & Hafner 



Heide M. Bronke 




Perspectives 257 







Professor Jane Ashley 



Cheryl Sunrany 



The reason Boston College's 
School of Nursing is ranked in the 
top twenty nationally is that it has 
professors as talented and dedi- 
cated as Jane Ashley. Ever since 
she joined the faculty in 1983, she 
has been developing close bonds 



with her students and treating 
them with the same care and con- 
cern she exhibits towards her pa- 
tients. 

"Professor Ashley is one of the 
most competent professors I've 
ever had," notes Mary Ann 



Walker, SON 1993. "It's nice to 
know that there are professors 
like her who enjoy dealing with 
students on a personal level. She 
is an excellent role model as a 
nurse, teacher and friend." 

Interestingly enough, Prof. 
Ashley did not always know she 
would be a nurse. The idea came 
to her when she was 18 and in the 
hospital with pneumonia. She was 
deeply impressed with how the 
nurses treated her, and realized 
that she, too, might like to become 
a nurse. Then, during the Viet- 
nam War, there was a lot of rein- 
forcement for choosing an altru- 
istic profession like nursing, and 
she made her decision. 

At BC, Prof. Ashley teaches 
Adult Health, a pivotal class in 
the nursing curriculum. In their 
junior year, students take this class 
and for the first time begin to pull 
together everything they have al- 
ready learned. The class itself is 
composed of lectures followed by 
ten hours a week at Beth Israel 
Hospital, with Ashley serving as 
a clinical advisor. 

As a teacher, she is sensitive to 
the fact that all of the technical 



terms can make her lectures seem 
like they are in a foreign language. 
For this reason, she brings in a lot 
of examples from clinical practice 
to help clarify the concepts be- 
hind the terminology. 
At the hospital, she oversees her 
students as they apply what they 
have learned in her class to cases 
involving real people. She dedi- 
cates this same sense of enthusi- 
asm to volunteer work outside 
the hospital. 

She is especially proud of the 
work she has done for the Bridge 
Over Troubled Waters program. 
As a volunteer, she rides in a 
medical van to certain spots in 
downtown Boston, administering 
basic medical treatments and tests 
to homeless people. Prof. Ashley 
also spends some of her time 
volunteering at a drug addiction 
treatment center and tutoring BC 
students for their state board ex-, 



* 



ams. 

"I just love interacting with 
people," comments Ashley. "It's 
great to be able to offer assistance 
to people and really make a dif- 
ference in their lives." 



•VV. i„ I 



Thanks to the efforts of Profes- 
sor George Ladd, there are eigh- 
teen high school seniors who are 
about to receive an astounding 
opportunity - a college education. 



Professor Ladd founded the pro- 
gram known as 'College Bound' 
to aid those students attending 
non-exam high schools in the Bos- 
ton area. In Ladd's view, people 



Professor George Ladd 



Office of Communications 




looking at the non-exam schools 
had the erroneous assumption 
that these institutions were some- 
how of inferior quality; and for 
this reason, much less was ex- 
pected of the students attending 
such institutions. The vast major- 
ity of youngsters graduating from 
these high schools did not go on 
to college, partly because there 
was no encouragement for them 
to do so. Professor Ladd states 
that, "the assumption is made that 
if you have anything going for 
you, you will go to an exam 
school." College Bound exists to 
prove this assumption wrong. 
The selection of students for this 
program occurs in the eighth 
grade. Various criteria are used 
in the selection process; for in- 
stance, a prospective student must 
have a B average, must show some 
potential for leadership, and have 
strong family support. Of course, 
only students going on to non- 
exam high schools affiliated with 
College Bound can be accepted. 
At the moment, this means pupils 



attending West Roxbury, Hyde 
Park, and Brighton High Schools. 
However, this may soon 
change. Currently, evaluations 
of the program are underway as 
Ladd's pilot class nears gradua- 
tion. The evaluation committee 
is now looking at ways to institu- 
tionalize the program on a large 
scale. In the future, Ladd would 
like to see College Bound spread 
to other large metropolitan areas, 
as well as to other high schools 
and universities. 

Overall, Professor Ladd is 
pleased with the progress of his 
program. "We've had some great 
successes, and we've had some 
things that haven't gone well, but 
then, changes take time." Never- 
theless, Professor Ladd can be 
proud of his achievements as all 
eighteen graduating seniors are 
going on to college. He can only 
hope that the next 'College Bound' | 
class, who are now sophomores, 
do as well as his pilot class. 



258 Perspectives 



Many students would agree 
at you haven't really graduated 
Z unless you've had a class with 
w professor Da\'id P. Tvvomey. 
short, he gi\'es his students their 
oney's worth. He possesses tha t 
re ahilitv to inspire and chal- 
ige students while entertaining 
em with a quick and engaging 
nse of humor. 

Vith the exception of one year, 
■ has spent \'irtually his entire 
ademic career draped in EC's 
.iroon and gold. He is a bona 
le "triple Eagle," having gradu- 
?d BC Hiiih, Boston College, and 
I law school. He has also spent 

years as one of the college's 
emier professors, leaving a 
;ting impression on more than 
o decades of students. 

"BC is mv school," notes 
^•omev. "I feel lucky to be here, 
ant think of a better place to be. 
m\' da\-s there were man\' more 
iuits. Some were warm and 
Dnderfully funny; all were de- 
mding and \-erv caring about 
;ir students. Though I can't re- 
|.y these individuals, I attempt 
continue their methods for the 
nefit of students here at BC." 



And \vhat exactly is that method? 
It's known as theTwomey Method 
of Teaching and it's actually an 
amalgamation of all the good 
teachers he had while a student in 
the BC "system." Very early in the 
semester his classes become a 
small community, where every 
one learns each other's name and 
everybody is made to feel like a 
necessary ingredient to the class' 
success. 

Besides his remarkable success 
as a teacher. Prof. Twomey is also 
one of the nation's top labor ar- 
bitration lawyers. In 1987 he was 
one of three arbitrators chosen by 
President Reagan to work on an 
extremely sensitive case involving 
six separate unions. It amounted 
to quite a Herculean task, with he 
and two other arbitrators working 
arounci the clock for thirty days 
straight. What was particularly 
satisfying for Prof. Twomey, 
though, was that the parties not 
only accepted his committee's 
recommendations, but that they 
followed them to the letter. 

His arbitration experience and 
his scholarly pursuits are essential 
to his lectures at BC. By keeping 




^^S:l 



r^-^.r 




Cheryl Simrany 



Professor David P. Twomey 



informed, he is able to merge de- 
veloping topics into his classes. 
"My personal goal is to serve the 
needs of the students to the best 
of my ability," comments 
Twomey. "I want to show stu- 
dents how the law works, how to 



deal with an attorney, and how 
to be a good witness. I want them 
to enjoy my class ... but I want 
them to understand the rigors 
and contested nature of law and 
the necessity for critical reading 
and thinking in all endeavors." 



"Even in these tough economic 

lies," savs Professor Joseph 

linn. Chairman of the Eco- 

mics Department, "Boston 

liege students are among the 

: \ileged who have the good 

time of a decent education and 

: od options ahead of them." Still, 

warns that there is a danger in 

; ng too complacent with regard 

aiowledge. In teaching courses 

e Econometrics" and seminars 

. Dut "Micro-economic PubUc 

■licv Issues", Professor Quinn 

; is to get across to the students 

lit the "world is full of unan- 

t ered questions. There is a 

Inger in education - in just con- 

Citrating on the things we al- 

i.dy kno^v. We should also 

s.phasize ho^v httle we actually 

Ikno^v - such as those areas in 

•ich legitimate disagreements 

: st, and in which students can 

I ke a real contribution, now and 

; n in life." 

Professor Quinn's most re- 
: it achievement in economic 
i cover\^ is a book called "Pass- 



ing the Torch", which analyzes 
the influence of economic incen- 
tives on retirement decisions and 
trends. In this work, which re- 
cently won an award from Alpha 
Sigma Nu, Professor Quinn dis- 
cusses how and when retirement 
patterns occur, and the financial 
incentives contributing to these 
patterns. Professor Quinn con- 
tinues his work with issues of 
retirement by collaborating with 
other distinguished writers. At 
the moment, he is one of several 
authors throughout the devel- 
oped western world who is 
looking at the transition from ca- 
reer jobs to retirement in the 
United States. 

Generally, Quinn sees a need to 
restructure the economy by allot- 
ting more resoiirces in education, 
especially for the very young. Al- 
though cutting back on education 
might appear to save money now, 
Quinn realizes that we will have 
to pay it back many times over in 
the future. For the students at 
Boston College, Quinn offers the 



warning to "never forget where 
you are in the distribution of good 
fortune with respect to education. 
Most of those behind you have 
not had the same opportunities 
you have had, and as educated 



citizens it is in everyone's best 
interest to keep those folks in 
mind. It is morally, politically 
and economically correct to pro- 
vide quality education to the next 
generation of Americans." 



Professor Joseph Quinn 



Cheryl Simrany 




Perspectives 259 




Office of Communications 



Dr. Joseph M. Pastore 



Last year when Executive Vice 
President Dr. Frank Campanella 
stepped down to become a pro- 
fessor after 18 years of service, he 
left Boston College's administra- 
tion with the laborious task of 
finding his replacement. BC had 
to work long and hard to find a 



candidate who could fill the shoes 
of someone who had done so 
much for this institution. 

After an entire semester of ex- 
tensive interviews and consider- 
ation, the selection committee fi- 
nally decided on longtime Pace 
University administrator. Dr. Jo- 



seph M. Pastore. BC could not 
have made a better choice. In his 
1 5 years at Pace, Pastore held sev- 
eral positions, including profes- 
sor. Dean of the Business School, 
and most recently, provost. By 
working at all of these posts, he 
has gained the necessary experi- 
ence and character to lead BC 
into the future. 

"I was very attracted to BC by its 
sense of balance," notes Pastore. 
"BC is a serious place that doesn't 
always take itself seriously. I'm 
not saying that people don't have 
a tremendous commitment to 
their work. It's just that they are 
able to take a step back and en- 
gage in a life beyond study." 

According to Pastore, the big- 
gest danger facing BC is an 
overcommitment to growth, 
wMch could lead BC into a deadly 
trap. To prevent this, he plans to 
make his decisions with the most 
possible care, making sure to al- 
ways build a consensus first. At 
the same time, he is committed to 
keeping with his schedule and 
maintaining a competent, deci- 
sive posture. 
In upcoming years, Pastore in- 



tends to maintain what the ad- 
ministration has already accom- 
plished while making a lot of im- 
provements with respect to BC's 
lack of facilities. Specifically 
Pastore will focus on building nev»i 
dorms on campus, facilities foi: 
graduate and law students, eu 
hancement for CSOM, and i 
much-awaited student center. li 
addition, Pastore will commi 
himself to developing Newtoi 
campus further, providing iti 
residents with improved athletii 
facilities and better programming 
Finally, Pastore promises t( 
work hard to improve the qualit] 
of life for students. He stresse 
that academic and student lifi 
should continue to become mori 
integrated. "The two shouldn' 
come together on a mandated ba 
sis," notes Pastore. "Instead, the 
should mesh naturally. Theybotl 
have the same purpose; namel) 
the full development of the stu 
dent. That's the wonderful thin 
about universities - that student 
have this great opportunity." 



Behind a desk, in a small office 
in Gasson Hall sits Margaret 
"Peggy" Ramirez, the Adminis- 
trative Assistant to Professor 
Hagg, the Foreign Study Advisor. 
Mrs. Ramirez comes to work ev- 
ery morning for a reason far more 



important than a paycheck - she is 
there to encourage students to 
accept the extremely challenging 
academic and cultural experience 
of study abroad. According to 
Mrs. Ramirez, such an experience 
is recommended for "anyone who 



Margaret Ramirez 



Sue Brown 




has the desire to learn about new 
cultures, as well as the capacity 
for understanding that there is a 
great deal to see outside the 
boundaries of our own country." 

With the support of Professor 
Flagg and the help of several 
work study students, Mrs. 
Ramirez is able to steer adven- 
turous students towards one of 
the most valuable experiences 
they will ever know. Yet in order 
to accomplish this, Mrs. Ramirez 
must first meet with representa- 
tives from around the world, at- 
tend conferences, and arrange 
meetings. Once these prelimi- 
naries have been accomplished, 
students begin to crowd the of- 
fice, seeking advice on which 
program to choose, or needing a 
little help with their paperwork. 
Then, of course, Mrs. Ramirez 
must also plan the various "Pre- 
Departure" and "Welcome Back" 
meetings for the students, as well 
as sending newsletters to Boston 
College students around the 
world. 

At the moment, Mrs. Ramirez 



is pleased with the recent growl 
of the Foreign Study Prograc 
She attributes part of its succe; 
to the fact that the administratic 
is encouraging foreign study as 
positive aspect of the BC expei 
ence. She says, "I hope that tl 
administration at BC will kee 
working towards a curriculum i 
global interest. We need to d 
what we can to increase people 
awareness of the great gift ( 
multi-diversity present here in tl 
United States, and what bett( 
way to achieve such an a warenei 
than to live in another culture'!' 
Foreign study offers each studei 
the chance not only to appreciai 
new countries, but to gain a fres| 
perspective of one's own homi 
land. 

Study abroad is a resoun 
which is not offered at every co 
lege or university throughout tl 
country. BC students should tal 
advantage of this marvelous oj 
portunity, an opportunity whic 
comes around only once in a lifi 
time. 

« 



260 Perspectives 



On February 8, 1991, Boston College 
id goodbye to one of its most distin- 
.lished alumni when US Rep. Silvio O. 
pnte passed away at age 69. For an 
"ibelievable thirty-two years, Conte had 
presented Massachusetts' First District 
j the House of Representatives, sporting 
s patented plaid jacket and drawing 
om a limitless supply of good humor 
\d charm. 

Conte graduated from the Heights in 
•49, at a time when EC's entire student 
xiv was significantly smaller. Armed 
ith a combined bachelor's-law degree, 
' began his professional career practic- 
g law and serving as a state senator for 
ne N'ears. In 1958, Conte moved his 
,fice to Washington DC when he was 
ected to serve his district in the United 
ates House of Representatives. 
Once in Congress, Conte quickly gained 
fluence and power. He became a 
ember of the House Appropriations 
."immittee, and by 1979 became its 
nking minority member. Through his 
isition on this committee and other sub- 
mmittees, he was able to implement 
any of his plans to improve this country's 
cial problems. In particular, he concen- 



"Boston College has 

lost one of its most 

ardently devoted sons." 

- J. Donald Monan, S.J. 



;ited on the environment, energy con- 

; r\-ation, veteran's issues, transportation, 

■ alth care and research. But his real 

: ncern was always education. 

\ son of Italian immigrants, Conte fre- 

:.ently spoke of how anything is pos- 

ole in America. He was very grateful for 

2 experiences he had as a student and 

.anted others to share similar opportu- 

'ies. Throughout his life, he believed 

. th conviction that the education of the 

xt generation should be one of this 

:untr\''s primary focuses. 

)ver the years Conte was instrumental 

bringing millions of government dol- 

stoBC. In the mid-1980's, he managed 

: secure federal funding for the Thomas 




Office ut Communications 



Silvio O. Conte 



p. O'Neill, Jr. Library. More recently, he 
sponsored legislation that awarded BC 10 
miUion dollars for a catalysis center in the 
new Chemistry Building. 

Many other colleges benefitted from 
Conte's desire to improve our country's 
educational system. One bill he wrote 
gave the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst $1.5 million for a renewable- 
energy research laboratory. Another bill 
granted Smith College the same amount 
of money for their science center, though 
neither branch of Congress had formally 
approved it. 

As much as he accompUshed on Capi- 
tol Hill, his most endearing quality was 
that he never forgot where he came from. 



He worked bullishly to pass legislation 
for the benefit of the entire country, but 
his heart was always with the people of 
Massachusetts. Conte made a point of 
keeping very close ties not only with his 
native Pittsfield, but with friends here at 
BC. As a tribute to his achievements, 
Boston College opened the Silvio O. Conte 
Forum in 1988, an athletic and convoca- 
tion center. 

At his funeral service, BC President J. 
Donald Monan, S.J. put it best: "Boston 
College has lost one of its most ardently 
devoted sons. It is a source of great pride 
to this University that his education in 
these halls opened the door upon a life- 
long career in public service." 



Perspectives 261 




262 Seniors 



SENIORS 




Wi 



hat is a friend? 
A single soul dwelling in two 
bodies. 

~ Aristotle 



Seniors 263 



MICHAEL AARON 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MICHELLE ABADIA 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



ROBERT ABBANAT 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 



LESLIE ABBOTT 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

English 



CYNTHIA ABELLA 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




KELLY 
ABERCROMBIE 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



JOSEPH ABRUZESE 

School of Management 

Finance / Information 

Systems 




AMY ADINOLFI 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MANOJ ADVANI 

School of Management 
Finance 




TARA 
ADYANTHAYA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



ELIZABETH AGNEW 

School of Management 
Economics 



TIMOTHY ACKLIN 

School of Management 

Finance / General 

Management 



ASHLEY ADAMS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



DREW ADAMS 

School of Management 
Economics / Finance 







272 Seiiiors 




KRISTIN AHR AMY AIELLO 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Conimunication Accounting 




CINDY ALBERT ROLANDO ALBUJA 

School of Education Arts and Sciences 




Elenientarv Edvication 



Psychology 



Sixto Ferro clowns around. 




LESLIE ALDRICH CATHERINE ALECCI CAMILLE MARVELLA 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences ALEJANDRO ALEXANDER 

Communication Economics School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Accounting Sociology 



NASAR ALI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




OMAR ALI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



KIMBERLY 
ALICANDRO 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ADELE ALINO ANGELINA ALIOTO MICHAEL ALLAN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Communication Sociology History 



Seniors 273 



ELIZABETH ALLEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MARGARET ALLEN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ROBERT ALLEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LAURIE ALOISIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



LYNETTE ALON 

School of Management 
Finance I 




MALENA AMATO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



Susan Long, Nasar Ali, Helena Dolan and Jen McEnroe get muddy during 

Winter Carnival 1989. 




TARA-JEN 
AMBROSIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



274 Seniors 



CAITLIN AMES 

School of Management 
Marketing 



NINA ANASTOS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



CANNON 
ANDERSON 

School of Management 
Finance 



KEVIN ANDERSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




I 



WILLIAM NICOLE ANDRADE ROSE ANDREJCZYK 

ANDERSON Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences Political Science English 
Economics/Philosophy 



DIMITRIOS 
ANGELIS 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



CYNTHIA ANNESE 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




EAGLE 
ANONYMOUS 

Flight School 
Aeronautics 



PAMELA 
ANTONOPOULOS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DEBORAH 
ANZOLEAGA 

Arts and Sciences 
International Relations 



ANTHONY APICELLA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



SHARI APONTE 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 

Spanish 




JENNIFER 
APPLEYARD 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ROBERT AQUINO 

School of Management 
Human Resources 




MARLINE ARANA DOMENIC ARANGIO 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Economics 




Seniors 275 




Chris Neylan smiles as he serves a hamburger to a very 
hungry Angela Venezia. 




DAVID ARIZINI 

School of Management 
Economics / Marketing 



JOANNA ARONG 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




MARIEL ARRAIZA 

School of Management 
Accounting 



MIGUEL ASPURU 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




JOHN ATKINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LISA AUBIN ELIZABETH AUDINO KIM AUDREY 

School of Management School of Nursing School of Management 
Finance Nursing Finance 



DEBORAH 
AUGUSTINE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




ALICIA AUMAND 

School of Management 
Accounting 



STEPHANIE 
AUTENRIETH 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



BARBARA AYALA 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



RUSSELL AYAN 

School of Management 

Operations Management/ 

Computer Science 



CARRIE 
BABBINGTON 

School of Education 
Elementary Educatio: 



\ 



276 Seniors 



KEVIN BACKE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



AMY BAGNELL 

School of Managenient 
Marketing 



JOHN BAGNULO 

School of Management 
Economics 



KIM BAHS 

School of Management 
Operations Management 



STEPHEN BAITER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




MINDI 
BALAKRISHNAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Ps\'cholog\' 




vNGELA BAMBECK 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




CHRISTINE 
BANNEN 

Arts and Sciences 
.'ominxmication/ English 



GAIL BALCERZAK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CHRISTINE BALDES 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MARY BALDWIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Spanish 



ARA BALIKIAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




Diana Fiumara, Jocelyn Keaveney, Portia Cirome, Amy Dietrich, Kathy Keating, 
Chrissy O'Neill and Sue Wolk enjoy time together away from the books. 



Seniors 277 



WILLIAM BARBERA JOSEPH BARBERIA 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Economics 



LORI BARKER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



TAYLOR BARNARD 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MEGHAN BARNES 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 




TIMOTHY BARNETT BARBARA BARRETT CHRISTY BARRETT 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Biochemistry English Accounting 




EMILY BARROWS 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



BRIDGET BARRY 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



CHRISTOPHER 
BARRY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




Mimi Konrad shows her BC spirit. 




ALI KEVIN BASTANI JOHN BATTAGLIA MARY BATTAGLIA KERRY BATTING ANN BAUERLEIN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Economics Economics Biology Human Resources Communication/ 

English 



278 Seniors 



1^^ 

JESSICA BAYS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / English 



JASON BEAL 

Arts and Sciences 
Conimunication 



ROBERT BEAL 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JASON BEANS STACY BEARDSLEY 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Finance Economics 




WADE BEESLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



CAROL BELLETETE 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



STEPHEN BELLOTTI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



SARA BELTZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Classics 



DAVID BENAZZO 

School of Management 
Marketing/Italian 



CHRISTOPHER 
BENJAMIN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



STEFANIE BENSON 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Jackque McLean, Lucia Thomas and Stacey Murray 
take time out from tailgating. 



Seniors 279 




280 Seniors 



Mm^c 



ii^WHM'^i'^'imWIU 




Seniors 281 




Kevin Duggan, Barry McDonald, Mark Moitoso, Tony Fuell 
and TJ Martinez look sharp for Homecoming 1991. 



STEFFAN 
BERELOWITZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




COLLEEN BERGIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ALAN BRIAN BERK ELAINE BERKELEY 

BERGSCHNEIDER School of Management Arts and Sciences 

School of Management Marketing English 
Accounting 



CARRIE BERNIER 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




DENISE BERRY 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



282 Seniors 



ROBERT BEUERLEIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KIRSTEN BEZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LISA BIELEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ELIZABETH BILAFER 

School of Management 
Accounting 






SHEREEN BINNO 

Arts anei Sciences 
Biology 



DAVID BLAKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MCOLE BLOCH 

Arts and Sciences 
I Economics 



SARAH 
BIRMINGHAM 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



AMANDA BISHOP RICHARD BISHOP FRED BITTNER 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 
History Accounting English /Philosophy 






DOUGLAS 
BLODGETT 

hool of Management 
Marketing 



MARK BLANDO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MICHELLE ANNE MARIE BLEB BETHANY BLESSING 

BLANFORD Arts and Sciences School of Management 

School of Management Biology Human Resources 
Finance / Marketing 




Seniors 283 



CHRISTOPHER 
BOCCACCIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



DREW BOECHER 

School of Management 
Finance / History 



VIRGINIA 
BOETTCHER 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ADRIENNE BOLAN MARC BOLAND 

School of Management School of Management 

Finance/ Finance 

General Management 




MICHAEL BOLDUC 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




LISA BOND 

School of Management 
Marketing 




ELIZABETH 
BONELLO 

School of Education 
Human Development 



JOHN BOLGER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ANNEMARIE 
BOLLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



ROBERT BONAZOLI JAMES BOND 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English / Philosophy Economics / Finance 




Janis Sorbello, Dina Cannalonga, Krissy Sheehy and Michelle Burns 



284 Seniors 




PAULA BONTEMPI 

Arts and Sciences 
Biolo^v 




HRISTINE BORDEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 




Gina LaRocca, Sherry Vitters, Allison Walton, Kathy Mendes and Laurie Toner 




IICHAEL BORGIOLI MICHAEL BOSSIDY 

ichool of Management Arts and Sciences 



Finance 



English 



DEBORAH 
BOSWORTH 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



STEVEN BOTTARI DOUG BOUDREAU 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Political Science 




VERNA BOUGH NICOLE BOULAIS 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Histor}' Psychology 



KATHERINE 
BOULOS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LISA BOVEROUX 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JOHN BOWERS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 285 



NICOLA BOWERS 

School of Education 
Middle School 



JAMES BOWLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CAROLINE BOYLE 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

English 



LORRAINE BOYLE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JILL BOYNTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




HEATHER BRACE ROBERT BRADBURY 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Sociology Communication 




GARRETT BRADLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



MARY BRADLEY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Cristin Foley really enjoys lunch 
at the Luxembourg McDonald's. 




SCOTT BRADLEY 

School of Management 
Finance 



MARY ELLEN 
BRADY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



WALTER 
BRAILLARD 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



COLLEEN 
BRANSFIELD 

School of Education 
Human Development 



LAURA-LEE 
BRATHWAITE 

School of Management 
General Management 



286 Seniors 



BRIGITTE 
BRAUNGER 

Arts and Sciences 



Biology 



JENNIFER BREBBIA JENNIFER BREEN THOMAS BREMNER CHARLIE BRENNAN 

School of Education School of Management Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Human Development Marketing Philosophy Marketing 




ERIN BRENNAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



KEVIN BRENNAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 




pANIEL BRITTEN ERIC BROCK 

hool of Management School of Management 
Marketing Accounting 




MARK BROCK 

I hool of Management 
Marketing 



MICHAEL 
BRODERICK 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



TRACY BRENNAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CHRISTINE 
BRINKLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Philosophy 



MEGAN BRITT 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




Seniors 287 




Liesl Anzoleaga, Megan Mount, Debra Sullivan and Donna Merhige 
rest in the sun behind their Mod before the Michigan game. 




11 
PETER ERODING 

School of Managment 
Marketing 




HEIDE BRONKE 

School of Management 
Marketing 




PAMELA BRONSON 

School of Management 
Economics /Finance 



DAVID BROOKS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



HEIDI BROOKS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology / Psychology 



JENNIFER BROOKS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SUSAN BROOKS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




JOHN BROPHY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



AMY BROWN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CHRISTINA BROWN 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER 
BROWN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



RAYCHEL BROWN 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 



288 Seniors 



REX BROWN 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



KAREN BROWNE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MARY BRUNO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



VICTORIA BRUNO JENNIFER BRUTMAN 

Arts and Sciences School of Education 

Art History Elementary Education 




MARY BETH 
BUCCIAGLIA 

:hool of Management 
Finance 




LBERTO BUFALINI 

:hool of Management 
General Management 




ELIZABETH 
BURGESS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



PAOLA 
BUCHBINDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER RAJESH BUDHRANI 
BUCKLEY School of Management 

School of Management Finance 

Business Administration 



ANN BUDKA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




Seniors 289 




Seniors 290 




Seniors 291 



JORDAN BURGESS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



MICHAEL 
BURGMAIER 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MANUEL BURGO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



CARRIE-ANNE 
BURKE 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



CHRISTOPHER 
BURKE 

School of Management 
Marketing 




PATRICK BURKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



PETER BURKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



BRETT BURNS 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Philosophy 



ALISON BURTIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics/History 



KEVIN BURTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 




ELIZABETH BUTLER 

School of Management 
Marketing 



DIANA BUTTERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




KRISTIN BUZUN 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



292 Seniors 



DAVID BYRD 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 





KEELIN BYRNE 

ichool of Manacrement 
Marketine: 




KERRY BYRNE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




Christa Hainey, Brad Schroeder, Erin Hurley, Mike Zilis and Chris Yeomans 
get together for some fun before the BC-Miami game. 




VIICHELLE BYRNE BRIDGET BYRON 

ichool of Managment School of Management 

Marketing 



Marketing 



VERONICA 
CABALLERO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SUSAN CABAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



BRIDGIT CABRAL 

Arts and Sciences 
Slavic Studies 




JUDITH CABRAL JOHN CADOGAN 

:hool of Management School of Management 
J Accounting Information Systems 



AMY CAHILL 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



STEPHEN CALABRO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



MICHAEL 

CALLANAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Political Science 



Seniors 293 





Jen Meadows, Steve Lavelle and Mary Pat Daly 



KIMBERLY CALNAN 

School of Education 
Human Development 




ANNMARIE 
CAMERON 

Arts and Sciences 
History/English 



ANDREA 
CAMPANELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



STEPHANIE 
CAMPBELL 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DINA 
CANNALONGA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KATHLEEN CANNEY 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 




KATHLEEN 

CANNING 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



DONNA CANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



PAUL CANTELLO 

School of Management 
Finance/Marketing 



ROBERT CANTERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ANGELA CANTY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



294 Seniors 



MELANIE CAOILE 

chool of Management 
|)perations Management 



GREGORY CAPOZZI LUCI CAPUTO 

Arts and Sciences School of Education 

Economics Elementary Education/ 

Psychology 



THOMAS CAPUTO 

School of Management 
Marketing 



CYNTHIA CARBO 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




VICOLE CARELLI 

! hool of Management 
Finance 



LISA CAREY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



PETER CARIGNAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



JANE CARLETTA 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



KATHLEEN 
CARMICHAEL 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



Seniors 295 



CATHLEEN CARNEY CHRISTOPHER 

School of Management CARR 

Economics School of Management 

Economics/Finance 



DONNA CARR 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



AMY CARRARA 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



JOSE CARRERAS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




PAUL CARROLL 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



GINA CARTOLANO LUCAS CARVALHO STEPHEN CASEY 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Italian/Psychology Operations Management Communication 




Jon Newkirk is joined by Audrey Kim, 
Alina Cho and Adele Alino. 



COLLETTE 
CASHMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




KRISTINA CASPER 

Arts and Sciences 
Independent 



CHRISTOPHER 
CASSARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




LISA CASTANO CHRISTINA 

School of Management CASTELLANO 

Marketing School of Management 

Finance 



296 Seniors 




MARY CAULFIELD 

Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry 



PATRICK 
CAULFIELD 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




MICHAEL CAVACO DAVID 

Arts and Sciences CAVANAUGH 

Political Science School of Management 

Finance 




Sheila Sullivan and Eileen O'Hara 





DANIEL 
CAVARELLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CRAIG CELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



VIRNA CENCE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JENNIFER 
CENEDELLA 

School of Management 
Finance 



GEOFFREY CHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




SAU-KING CHAN 

ol of Manage! 
Accounting 



chool of Management 



JEANETTE 
CHANDLEE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



WENDY CHAUVIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



SULAN CHEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CHEN CHENG 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 297 




DAVID CHERMOL 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




AMY CHESEK 

School of Management 
Finance 




Let's make a deal! Allison Glovna, Jennifer McEnroe and Maryellen 
Mackinnon are suited up for Halloween. 





CHRISTIE CHEYNE TANYA CHIARELLI 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Sociology English 



ALEXANDRA 
CHILDS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ANN CHILDS 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

Psychology 



CAROLINE CHO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




PATRICIA CHOCIEY JENNIFER CHOE 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 
Communication/ Economics 

Political Science 



298 Seniors 



EUNHEE CHOI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



YONG CHOI 

School of Management 
Finance 



PATRICK 
CHRISTMAS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



II 



• REGORY CHRISTO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KIMBERLY 
CHRISTOPHER 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



JANET 
CHRISTOPHERSON 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KIM ClAMPA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



LAURA ClAMPA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




AUREEN CICCIA 

.Vrts and Sciences 
English 



PAUL CICHELLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



PATRICIA CIERVO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




PORTL\ CIROME 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



GIA TERESA 
CIUMMO 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




IICHAEL CLANCY 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



NICHOLE CLARK 

School of Management 
Finance 



THOMAS CIMENO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DEIDRA CIRIELLO 

Arts and Sciences 

Geology / Political 

Science 




Treacy Kiley and Katie Norton are also part of the 
Halloween festivities as Peter Pan and Tinkerbell. 



Seniors 299 




Seniors 300 




Seniors 301 



PAUL CLARK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JOHN CLASCA 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



JOSEPH CLAUSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



AMY CLAUSS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



JOSEPH CLEARY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




KATHLEEN CLEARY 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




JOHN CLOUTIER 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




ELEANOR 
COGLIANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Geophysics 



KEVIN CLEMONS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / English 



CAROLE CLINE 

School of Management 
Accounting / Psychology 



DEIRDRE 
CLOHOSEY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MARY CLOONAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




302 Seniors 




MARY ELLEN 
COLLINS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ARLINE COLON 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



MARIA COLON 

School of Management 
Marketing 



ROSA COLON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



STEPHEN COMER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




CHRISTOPHER 
COMERFORD 

-Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



DAMIAN COMITO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KELLY 
CONCANNON 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



MEGAN 
CONCANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



MEREDITH 
CONCANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Political Science 



Seniors 303 




CHRISTOPHER 
CONCEMI 

School of Management 
Marketing 



SARAH CONDON 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




JAMES CONDON 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JENNIFER CONLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




Lisa Noller, Barry McDonald and Margie Griffith 
celebrate July Fourth. 




TIMOTHY CONNELL 

Arts and Sciences 
German 



CHRISTOPHER 
CONNELLY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



STEVEN CONNELLY 

School of Management 
General Management 



JAMES CONNER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JAMES CONNERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / English 




MARY KAY 
CONNOLLY 

School of Management 
Economics 



SEAN CONNOLLY 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



COLEEN CONNOR GREGORY CONNOR JAMES CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Political Science History /Political English 

Science 



304 Seniors 



MARCUS CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



CASEY CONNORS 

School of Management 
Finance 



TIMOTHY 
CONNORS 

Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art 



MARIA GRACE 
CONSIGLI 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



CHRISTOPHER 
CONWAY 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 




ALEXIA COREY 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy/English 



JOHN COREY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KRISTINE CORLETT JAMES CORMIER MARY CORPORAN 

School of Nursing School of Management DUNN 

Nursing Finance Arts and Sciences 

Geology 



Seniors 305 



HELDER CORREIA COLLEEN CORRON 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Finance /Computer Philosophy / English 
Science 



BERNADETTE 
COSTELLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



CHRISTOPHER 
COSTELLO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



BARBARA 
COUGHLAN 

Arts and Sciences 
French 




NICOLE 
COURNOYER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



COLLEEN COURT 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication / 

English 



STEVE COURTISS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




THOMAS 
COURTNEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LOUISE MARY 
COVENEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




CLARISSE 
COWDERY 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



MICHAEL COYNE 

School of Management 
Accounting 




JAMES CRAMER 

School of Management 
Finance 



MARGARET 
CRAWFORD 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



306 Seniors 




vlARGARET CROLEY CHARLES CRONEY 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Communication/ Economics/ 

English Mathematics 



ANN CRONIN 

Arts and Sciences 
EngUsh 



PATRICIA CRONIN TIMOTHY CRONIN 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Psychology Finance 




WILLIAM CRONIN 

school of Management 
Accounting 



GUY CROSS 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics /Philosophy 



ANACRISTINA 
CROWLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JANE CROWLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



PAUL CRUZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 307 





PAULA CUCCI 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Row 1: Deb Meloni, Lisa Aubin, Adam Marshall, Deb Delois, Andy 
Papanicolau and David Hahn Row 2: Joe Ryan, Bryan Hawkom, Rob 
Whitton and Russ Ayan 





CARMEN CUEVAS 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




CHRISTOPHER 
CULHANE 

School of Management 
Finance 



BRIAN CULLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



KELLI CULLUM 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

History 



CHRISTEL 
CUNNINGHAM 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



CHRISTINE 
CUNNINGHAM 

School of Management 
Finance / Operations 




JAMIE CURCI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



308 Seruors 



HEATHER CURCIO 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



FRANCIS CURLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy / Psychology 



MAJORIE CURLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



BRIDGET CURRAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



NICOLE CURRAN KATHLEEN CURTIN MARY CURTIN KATHRYN CURTIS 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 

Psychology Philosophy Accounting Finance/ Information 

Systems 



JAMES CURVEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




JOHN CUSTER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



BRIDGET CUTTICA LISA D'ALLEVA 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Political Science Accounting 




RONALD 
DABROWSKI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




DANA DADDARIO 

School of Management 
Finance 



LAURA 
D'AMBROSIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



GERALD D'AVOLIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




Seniors 309 




310 Seniors 




Seniors 311 



ROSEMARIE DAHDAH DAVID DAILEY 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication/ Finance 

Philosophy 



DAVID DALEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ELIZABETH DALEY RODNEY DALLAPE 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Political Science Economics 




TERESA DALLAS LORRAINE DALTON 

School of Nursing School of Nursing 

Nursing Nursing 



JUDITH DALY 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



MARY DALY PATRICK DALY 

School of Education School of Management 
Elementary Education Finance 




MATTHEW DANEHY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



LAURA DANIEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




JACQUELINE DANIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



312 Seniors 



DEEPAK 
DARYANANI 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 





TARA DAURAY 

ichool of NUinagement 

Human Resources/ 

Marketing 




KEVIN DAVIS 

chool of Management 



Marketing 




Joe Lukas, Dave Mastrostefano, Meg Crawford and Mike Zilis 
cheer on the football team at Alumni Stadium. 





TIMOTHY DAY 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



JUAN DE KRUYFF 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JOAQUIN 
DE-LPIEDRA 

School of Management 
Finance/Marketing 



GINA DEACETIS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



PAUL DEELEY 

School of Management 
Accounting 




'APHNE DEFLESCO 

Arts and Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



MARYANNE 
DEFRANCESCO 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



ARNOLD DEGARCIA 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



CATHERINE 
DEL BUONO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



RENEE DEL GIORNO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



Seniors 313 




Celia Morelli and Anjanette Farina tailgate as Kevin O'Malley 
watches from behind the sneaker tree. 




JOHN DEL MASTRC 

School of Management 
Accounting 




MARIA CRISTINA 
DEL VALLE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




ELISA DELA 
HOUSSAYE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy / Psychology 



MICHAEL DELAY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ROSEMARIE DELEO JOSEPH DELLANNO 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Sociology Finance 



TARA DELNERO 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




DEBORAH DELOIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



314 Seniors 



ALEXANDER 
DEMAKIS 

School of Management 
Accounting 



CELESTE DEMARCO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



WILLIAM DEMPSEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



RALPH DENISCO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MARTIN DENNING 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy 



CHRISTOPHER 
DENNIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



KRISTEN DENTY 

School of Education 
Human Development 



JONATHAN DEPAZ 

School of Management 
Marketing 



DAVID DERING 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




ARLENE 
DERMOVSES 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ELEANOR DEROPP 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 




SHAWN DEROSA JOAN DERUBEIS 

School of Management School of Management 
Marketing Accounting /Informa- 

tion Systems 




ANTONIA 
DESANTIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MARK DESMOND 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




LORI DESROCHES 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology / English 



CHRISTOPHER 
DEVAUX 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ELIZABETH DEVIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



Seniors 315 





MICHAEL ROBERT DI CHIARA 

DEWINTER School of Management 

School of Management Finance 

Finance / Philosophy 



Deanne England and Bryan Hawkom 
pose for a picture before Homecoming 1991. 




HAYDAR DIAB 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CHARLES DIANA 

School of Management 
Accounting 




VICTOR DIASO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



CARLOS DIAZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JENINE DIAZ 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



JOANNE 
DICAMILLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ELISE DICARLO 

Arts and Sciences 

Comnnunication/ 

Political Science 




STEPHEN DICENSO DAMIAN DIDDEN AMY DIETRICH DAVID DIFRANCO CHRISTOPHER 

School of Management Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management DIIURO 

Finance Philosophy Human Development Finance School of Management 

Accounting / Finance 



316 Seniors 




KATHERINE 
DILATUSH 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



CATHERINE 
DILLIHUNT 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



COLLEEN DILLON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MICHELE 
DIMATTEO 

School of Management 
Accounting 



ANTONIETTA 
DIMEO 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




ANGELO PAUL DIOGUARDI 

DIMITRIOU Arts and Sciences 

School of Management Political Science 
Marketing 



AMY DIPRIMA 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



NICOLE DIRICO CHARLES DIRKSEN 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Accounting Philosophy 




Seniors 317 





MATTHEW 

DOCKERY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



Happy 21st birthday, Mike Shale! Celebrating the occasion at MaryAnn's are 
Mike Reilly, Pete Ocampo, Janet Sarkissian, Mike Shale and Marc Wall. 




JENNIFER DOHERTY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



fl 




MICHAEL DOIRON HELENA DOLAN 

School of Education School of Management 

Secondary Education/ Finance 
History 



ELIZABETH 
DONAHOE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JOHN DONAHUE 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



ROBERT 
DONARUMA 

School of Education 
Human Development 




SUZANNE 
DONEGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 

318 Seniors 



NICHOLAS 
DONINGER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DARAH DONNELLY HELEN DONNELLY DANIEL DONOVAN 



Arts and Sciences 
Theater 



Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



School of Management 
Accounting 




JULIE DONOVAN KEVIN DONOVAN TIMOTHY DOOLING JOHN DORAN 



Arts and Sciences 

Economics/ 
Political Science 



School of Management 
Finance 



Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



School of Management 
Finance 



STEPHEN DORE 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




HOMAS DORGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CHRISTOPHER 
DOROSZCZYK 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics/German 



LAURIE DORSEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



BRIAN DOSSIE 

School of Management 
Finance 



CHRISTOPHER 
DOWD 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




Lisa Menasian smiles amid the clutter of 
her dorm room. 



Seniors 319 




320 Seniors 





Seniors 321 



SARAH DUFFLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Theology 



ALISON DUFFY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ANDREW DUFFY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 




JENNIFER DUFFY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



MOLLY DUFFY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



KEVIN DUGGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




SCOTT DUNBAR 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



DANIELLE DUNLAP 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



GERALD DUNNING 

School of Management 
Finance 



DEBORAH DUFFY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ELIZABETH DUFFY 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




Mike MacNeil and Vic Diaso pose f( 
the camera during a football game. 




KATHLEEN DUNPHY 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



322 Seniors 



MARILYN DUPIUS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ROBERTO DURAN 

School of Management 
Finance 



JULIE ANN 
DUSCHKA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



SHARI-LYN DUTTO>. 

School of Management 
Information Systems 




MAUREEN DWYER 

School of Management 
Marketing 



BEN DYE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ROBERT EARLEY III 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LEXY EDELEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Sociology 





PAMELA EGAN 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



CHRISTIAN EIDT SAADIQ EL-AMIN 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Finance Biology 



WILLIAM ELDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



CATHIE ELDRIDGE 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




KIMBERLY ELLWEIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



NORMAN ELROD 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



DARREN ELWOOD 

School of Management 
Finance 



CAROLINE 
ELZEMEYER 

Arts and Sciences 
French /History 



STEVEN EMDE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 323 



SARAH EMILIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CYNTHIA ENDRIGA DEANNE ENGLAND 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Psychology Operations Management 



CHRISTOPHER 
ENGLERT 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SHARON ENGLUND 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




DANIEL ENNIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ELENA EPATKO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



PAUL ERBAFINA 

School of Management 
Marketing 



ASHLEY 
ERIKSMOEN 

Arts and Sciences 

Geology 



DIANA ERMINI 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




Eve Marie Eyde, Claudia Scappicchio, Bonnie Fong, Melody 
Rosier-Edner, Leianna Young, and Teresa Savino 



PETER ESCHMANN 

School of Management 
Finance 



KEITH ESPINOSA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



324 Seniors 




Kerry Hughes clutches her arm 
in surprise. 



KELLY EVANS 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



STEPHANIE EVANS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



WILLIAM EVANS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




EILEEN EVEY 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication/ 
English 



EVEMARIE EYDE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy/Theater 



PETER FABRIELE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



SEAN FAHERTY 

School of Management 

Finance 



KEVIN FAHEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




STEVEN FAHMIE KELLY FALCHECK 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Finance Psychology 



FRANK FALCONE 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Spanish 



JOHN FALLON 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



LISA FAMIANO 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



Seniors 325 




ANJANETTE FARINA 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




TRACY FARR 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




Mark Moitoso impresses the guests at a 
Harvard Party with his healthy set of tonsils. 




CHRISTOPHER 
FARMER 

School of Management 
Marketing 




LAUREN FAZIO 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Education/Economics 




ELIZABETH FEARON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ALICIA FEDERICO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ANITA FEDERICO 

Arts and Sciences 
Italian 



DAWN FEELEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



MAURA FEELEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




STACEY FEELEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SAMANTHA 
FEHRENBACH 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



PETER FELONEY ANDREW FENTRESS GREGORY FENZL 

School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Marketing Political Science Biology 



326 Seniors 



MEREDITH 
FERCHILL 

School of Education 
Earlv Childhood 



PETER FERNANDEZ 

School of Management 
Finance 



REINALDO 
FERNANDEZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art 



MARIA SOFIA 
FERRAIUOLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



LISA FERRARI 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 




ELISA FERRARO 

School of Education 
Earlv Childhood 



JAMES FERREIRA MICHAEL FERRIER 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Business Administration Economics 



DANIEL FERRIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



RONALD FERRIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




MICHAEL 
FICOCIELLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



Seniors 327 



BRIAN FIELDING CARLA FIELDS JUAN FIGUEROA ANN MARIE FILLES RICHARD FINCH 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

English Marketing/ Marketing Communication History 
Communication 




CYNTHIA FINLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DAVID FINN 

School of Management 
Economics/ 
Philosophy 




MARGARET FINN 

School of Management 
Marketing 



BERNARD 

FINNEGAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Biology / Philosophy 





RICHARD 

FINNEGAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 

328 Seniors 



JOHN FIORE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JENNIFER FISCHL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LAUREN FISH 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JENNIFER 
FITZGERALD 

School of Education 
Secondary Ed. /English 





JOHN FITZGERALD 

School of Management 
Marketing 



PAUL FITZGERALD 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



Audrey Kim laughs at something Paul Mengedoth said 




KATHRYN 
FITZPATRICK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DIANA FIUMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




TIMOTHY DELBERT 
FLACKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



JOHN FLAHERTY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



NICOLE FLAHERTY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



THOMAS FLAHERTY 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



TIMOTHY 
FLAHERTY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




KATE FLANIGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MARY FLATLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JOHN CHRISTIAN 
FLEISSNER 

School of Management 
Accounting 



LAUREN FLEMING 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



STUART FLERLAGE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 329 




330 Seniors 



For life, with all it yields of joy and 

woe, 

And hope and fear,-believe the aged 

friend - 

Is just a chance o* the prize of learning 

love. 

-Robert Browning 




Seniors 331 




Rebecca Hayes and Laurie Dorsey sit on the steps 
of O'Neill Plaza waiting for the pep rally to begin. 




KATHLEEN FLYNN 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy 



KELLY FLYNN 

School of Management 
Marketing 



LAURA FLYNT 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



CAITLIN FOLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



BARBARA FLYNN 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 




CHRISTOPHER 

FLYNN 

Arts and Sciences 

Political Science 




CRISTIN COYLE 
FOLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




JODY FOLEY BONNIE FONG NEILA FONSECA ANTHONY KATIE FORKER 

School of Management School of Management School of Management FORCIONE School of Managemen 

Accounting Finance Marketing School of Management Accounting 

Finance 



332 Seniors 




EDWARD NICHOLAS FORSA 

FORRISTALL School of Management 

School oi Management Finance 
Marketing 




CHRISTOPHER 
FOURNIER 

Arts and Sciences 



inglish/ Secondary Ed. 



KELLY FOWLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




CHRISTINE FOY 

Arts and Sciences 
B iology / Psychology 



ANN FRALICK 

Arts and Sciences 

Spanish 




KARA FORTE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JUSTIN FOSTER BRIAN FOURNIER 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Human Resources Political Science 




ANNE FRAME CHRISTOPHER CATHERINE ANN AMANDA FRANKS JEAN FRANZBLAU 

School of Education FRANCESCANI FRANCIS Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Secondary Education School of Education School of Education Theater Business 

Secondary Ed. /English Early Childhood 



Seniors 333 



DAVID FRANZOSA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



DAVID FRASER 

School of Management 
Finance 



DONALD FRASER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JAMES FREELEY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



SCOTT FREEMAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy/ 
Political Science 




SALLYANNE 
FRENCH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ROBERT FREUND 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / Philosophy 



SONJA FRICK 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CARL FRIEDMANN 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



DONALD FRILLICI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




Clare Rose and Jen Spaziano share the spot 
light at the Star Search lounge. 



KATHLEEN FUREY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ANGELA GABBETT 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



334 Seniors 





MICHAEL GABRYS 

School of Management 
Accounting/Finance 



«r 



Gary Lo, Jamie Miller, Joe Abruzese, Nicole Jozwiakowski, and Bonnie Fong 




ROBERT MICHAEL 
GAETA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




MARK GAFFNEY LYNNE GAGNE JESSICA GAIN JENNIFER GALEAZZI DENNIS 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences GALLAGHER 

Economics Marketing Accounting Communication/ School of Management 

Psychology Accounting 




BRENDAN 
GALLAHUE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



SCOTT GALLETTI 

School of Management 
Finance/English 



CARLTON 
GALLIGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Theology 



RACHAEL GALOOB MICHAEL GALVIN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy Political Science 



Seniors 335 




MELISSA GANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KAREN GANONG 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JUAN GARAICOA 

School of Management 
Economics/Finance 



MARYELAINE 
GARDELLA 

Arts and Science 
English 



ELIZABETH GANEM 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KEVIN GANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ANTHONY GARINO 

School of Management 

Finance / Operations 

Management 




ELKE GAROFALO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



336 Seniors 



DANIEL GARRITY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MARGARET 
GARROU 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



GREGORY GATTI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DENNIS GAUGHAN 

School of Management 
Marketing 



NATASHA WILLIAM GAULT JENNIFER GAUS KENNETH GAYRON 

GAUJEAN School of Management School of Education School of Management 

Arts and Sciences Finance Elementary Education Finance 

l\i mmunication/ French 



ROBERT GEARY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




The Three Dominoes: Carisa Lopez-Galib, 
Magda Marquez, Anabel Rodriguez 




JASON GEORGE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




WILLIAM GERETY 

School of Management 
Finance 



JOSEPH GERVAIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



DAVID GESMONDI 

School of Management 
Accounting 



JUAN GIACHINO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



GRACE 
GIAMBANCO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 337 



STEPHEN GIBELLI 

School of Management 
Finance 



WILLIAM GIESE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



CHRISTOPHER 
GILDEA 

School of Management 
Economics/Operations 



CAROLYN GILLAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KATHLEEN 
GILLESPIE 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



I 




JENNIFER GILMORE 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MICHELE 
GIORDANO 

School of Management 
Marketing 



SUZANNE 
GIORDANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



DAVID GIUNTA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JOSEPH GLASMA^ 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



338 Seniors 



LEAH GLEASON 

School of Education 
Earlv Childhood 



PAUL GLEASON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ALLISON GLOVNA AMY GLOWACKI GERALDINE GLYNN 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Communication Economics Political Science 




FRANK GOGUEN 

School of Management 
Finance 



SEAN GOGUEN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JEREMY 
GONSALVES 

School of Management 
Accounting 



AMIE GONTHIER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




ANTONIO NICHOLAS 

GONZALEZ GONZALEZ-REVILLA 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing 



KATHARINE 
GOLDCAMP 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DEVIN GOLDEN LAUREEN GOLDEN 

School of Management School of Education 
Marketing Early Childhood 




Seniors 339 




340 Seniors 







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Seniors 341 



SANDI GOODMAN 

School of Management 
Finance 



GWENDOLYN 
GOODWIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Theater 



JEANNIE GOON 

School of Management 
Finance 



MARK GORDON 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Odd Fellows Local: Ryan Irvine, John Newkirk, Ray Santangelo, | 
Bill Cormier, Denise and Steven Vitalli 



MICHAEL GOSS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




KRISTEN 
GOUBEAUD 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




MARGARET GOULD PATRICK GOULD BRIAN GOURLEY MALEITA GOUSIE EILEEN GOVEKAK 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Communication History Accounting Psychology Biology 



342 Seniors 




ALLISON 
GRABENSTEIN 

School of Management 



Marketins; 



JOSEPH GRACE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




GERALD GRACEFFO SEAN GRADY 

School of Management School of Management 
Marketing Finance 




"So many men..." John Cloutier, Mary Ann 
Doyle, Tom Seczur 




ERIN GRAEFE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



BARTON GRAF 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KATHRYN 
GRALTON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CHRISTINE 
GRANADOS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



TERRENCE GRAY 

School of Management 
Finance /French 




HILARY GREEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



JASON GREENE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MAUREEN 
GREENWAY 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



JULIE GRENIER JAMES GRIFFIN 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Economics 



Seniors 343 



MARGARET 
GRIFFITH 

School of Education 
Elementary /Economics 



HEATHER 
GRIMSHAW 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



MARK GROSSMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



PAUL GUARINO 

School of Management 
Marketing 



THOMAS GUIDA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




RAMESH GULATI ANDREA GULINO 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing 




PHILLIP GUTTILLA 

School of Management 
Finance / Philosophy 



ALBA GUZMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




GARY GUZZI 

School of Management 
Finance 



EMILY HAGEN 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication / 

English 



SEAN GUSMINI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JENNIFER 
GUTMANN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



NICHOLAS 
GUTTILLA 

School of Management 
Finance / Philosophy 




The Euro-kids: Kathleen Killen, Eileen O'Hara, Dave 
(sprout) Crichton and Cristin Foley. 



344 Seniors 





KRISTEN HAGER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication/ 



Sociology 



REGINA HAGER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




"Peace, man".. .Christine Horrigan and Susan SomyodyJ 



JANE HAGGERTY LAURA HAGGERTY 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Economics English/Spanish 




CHRISTA HAINEY RHEA HALE 

School of Management School of Management 
Marketing/English Finance 



CHRISTINA HALL 

Arts snd Sciences 
English / Sociology 



KRISTINE HALL 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 




SUSAN HALL 

School of Education 
Elementar}' Education 



MAURA-KATE 
HALLAM 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JOHN HALPIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



PERRY HAMALIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



JAMES HAMMA 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 345 





DAVID HANAFIN CAROLYN 

School of Management HANIGAN 

Marketing School of Management 

Marketing 




MICHAEL HANNA ROBERT HANNA 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biology Economics /Philosophy 




SUSAN HANNIFIN MARK HANSBERRY LISA HARCHUCK DAVID HARNISCH MELISSA 

School of Education School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences HARRINGTON 

Elementary Education Finance Political Science Political Science School of Education 

Elementary Education 




BUFFEY HARRIS DENISE DILLON SHONYA HARRISON ANDREW HARTOG JASON 

School of Education HARRIS Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences HASENJAEGER 

Secondary Education/ School of Management Psychology Biology School of Management 

French Business Administration Marketing 

346 Seniors 



KIMBERLY HASLEY 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



CHRISTOPHER 
HAWKINS 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



BRYAN HAWKOM 

School of Management 
Economics 



JENNIFER HAYES 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



JOHN HAYES 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




MARGARET 
HAYNES 

Arts and Scieiices 
English 



REBECCA HAYS 

School of Management 
Finance 



LAUREN HEALY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MICHAEL HEALY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



CAROLINE HEBERT 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




Happy Halloween from Irene Sullivan, Amy Carrara, Claire Kates, 
Christine Baiinen, Molly Baldwin and Dina Strada! 



ERIKA HEIM 

Arts and Sciences 
International Studies 



Seniors 347 




THOMAS RENAULT 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




JOHN HENDERSON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




Spring fever at the Spring Game with Dina Cannalonga, The Eagle, 
Sue Kasok, Kerry Tighe and Lisa Ferrari. 





LAURA HENNESSEY 

School of Management 

Marketing/ 

Communication 



ERIC HENSEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



DIERK 
HERBERMANN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JOSHUA HERBERT ALEX HERBSTRITT 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Biology English /Mathematics 




ISMARY 
HERNANDEZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



DANA HERRMANN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



SCOTT HEYER 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KEVIN HICKEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KEITH HIGGINS 

School of Management , 
Accounting / English 



348 Seniors 



ANNA MARIA 
HIGHT 

Arts and Sciences 
Ps^'chc^lotrv 



ALBERTO HILL 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



RICHARD HILL EDWARD HILLMAN KERRI HILTUNEN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

History Mathematics English 




^ 



RAYMOND TARA HITCHCOCK KEVIN HO MELISSA HO CHRISTINE HOAR 

HIPPOLYTE Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Nursing 

chool of Management Political Science Accounting Marketing Nursing 
Marketing 




PATRICK HOEBICH 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




EMILY HOFFMAN 

School of Education 

Elementar}' Education/ 

English 




Seniors 349 




350 Seniors 




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Seniors 351 



KRISTEN HOFFMAN JULIE ANNE HOGAN MATTHEW HOGAN DONNA HOLDER 

Arts and Sciences School of Education Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Secondary Education/ Communication Communication 

History 



KEVIN HOOLAHAN 

School of Management 
Economics 




ELIZABETH 
HORNUNG 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



CHRISTINE 
HORRIGAN 

School of Management 
Marketing / Comm . 




KATHLEEN 
HORRIGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



DANIEL 
HOSTETTER 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 





Cheryl Simrany and Heide Bronke 
share fashion tips as they "boogie." 




ROBERT HOWE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



MICHAEL HOWELL 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DALE HUANG 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



EUGENE HUANG 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



JUDY HUANG 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



352 Seniors 




MELISSA HUG 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JEREMY HUGHES 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KERRY HUGHES 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MATTHEW HULL 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SCOTT HUMPHREY 

School of Management 
Finance 




KATHERINE HUNG 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JOHN HUNT 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



TODD HUOT 

School of Management 
Finance 



CAROLAN HURLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ERIN HURLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



Seniors 353 



KIMBERLY HURLEY 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



ADAM HURTUBISE 

Arts and Sciences 

History/ 

Political Science 



HOMIRA HUSSAIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



MARK 
HUTCHINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




QUANG HUWANG 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KRISTINE HYDE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



AMY HYLAND 

School of Education 
Human Development 



ARLENE lANELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



STEVEN lANNELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 





PHILIP IMBURGIA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



THOMAS INGRAM 

School of Management 
Finance 




NICOLE INNOCENTI ELIZABETH ISACCd 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Finance/ Mathematics 

Information Systems 



354 Seniors 



LYNN ISBELL 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



SARAH ISSLEIB 

School of Management 
Econoniics 




TRENT JANIK 

School of Management 
General Management 




ANTHONY 
JANNOTTA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JASON IZZI 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DANIEL JACK 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ELIZABETH JACOB 

School of Management 
Information Systems 




A cat and a hillbilly before they hit the town: Nancy 
McElhiney and Laura Daniel on Halloween. 





PRISTINE JANOVITZ 

School of Education 
Humaii Development 



PETER JANOW 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DAVID JELLISON EDWARD JENNINGS GERALD JENNINGS 

School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Business Management English Economics 



Seniors 355 



LEONARD 
JENNINGS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



SHANE JENNINGS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ROY JIMENEZ 

School of Management 
Accounting 



PETER JOEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ERIC JOHNSON 

School of Management 
Marketing 




RICHARD JOHNSON ROBERT JOHNSON TODD JOHNSON VICTORIA 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management JOHNSON 

Political Science Finance Accounting School of Education 

Elementary Education 



AISHA JORGE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




RUTHANNE JOSEPH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JENNIFER JOY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



356 Seniors 





KATHLEEN JOYCE 

School of Education 
Human De\-elopment 



NICOLE 
JOZWIAKOWSKI 

School of Management 
Marketing 




MELISSA JUBINSKY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KERRY JUROS 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




Screaming Eagle Colorguards: Sue Hall, Lana Simonian, 
Joy Rabadam, Lori Schneider. 




ALEX KABANOVSKY JENNIFER KACZKA 

Arts and Sciences School of Nursing 

Political Science Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER 
KACZOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



MARIE KACZOR 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



COSTAS KAIAFAS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




AUSTIN KAIRNES 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



PETER KAKRIDAS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



CHRISTINA 
KALANTZIS 

School of Management 
Marketing 



KRISTINE KALISZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ROBERT KANACZET 

School of Management 
Finance 



Seniors 357 




Kelly Flynn and Brad Schroeder are on their ' 
way to Homecoming 1991. 




ALISON KANE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ESMOND KANE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




JANET KANE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LISA KANE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




TABATHA KANE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



CINDY KANG 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy/ 
Political Science 



RICHARD KANG 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DANA KAPPEL 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



KATHRYN 
KARAGANIS 

School of Education 
Human Development 




KRISTIN KARAM ANTHONY 

School of Education KARAMAS 

Human Development/ School of Management 
English Marketing 



CHRISTINA 
KARAVITIS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



KIMBERLY 
KARRFALT 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



SUSAN KASOK 

School of Management 

Finance 



i 



358 Seniors 



HEATHER 
KASPERZAK 

-School of Management 



Accounting /Economics 



CLAIRE KATES 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



PETRINA KATSIKAS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



JOSEPH 
KAVANAGH 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



FIONNUALA KEADY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics /English 




ANNE KEANE 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



KARA KEARNEY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER 
KEATING 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KATHRYN 
KEATING 

School of Management 
Operations Management 




KEVIN KEATING 

School of Management 

Computer Science/ 

Marketing 




JOCELYN KEAVENEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




Michelle Villiote, Bonnie Fong, Renee DelGiomo, Claudia Scapicchio, Melody 
Rosier-Edner, Bridget Curran, Evemarie Eyde and Teresa Savino attend a pep rally. 



GLEN KEENAN 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Seniors 359 




360 Seniors 






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Seniors 361 



JOHN KEENE 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy/ 
Political Science 



KERRIE KEER 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



LESLEY PRUET 
KEITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



RICHARD DONALD PETER 

KELLEMAN III KELLER 

School of Management School of Management 

Marketing Finance 




KIMBERLY KELLER 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




KEVIN KELLY 

School of Management 
Finance 




SHARON KELLY 

School of Management 
Finance 



362 Seruors 



DONALD KELLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SEAN KELLEY 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



VICTORIA KELLEY 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics/ 
Political Science 




DONNA KELLY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




NATHAN KELLY 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 




ROBERT KEMPKEN 

School of Management 
Finance 




MARIE KENDRA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication/ 
English 




CATELIN KENEALLY 

School of Management 
Marketing 





"Aren't we cute?"...Dan Ferrin, Anthony Sileo, Mike Tarlin, 
Mark Grossman, Tom Nolan. 




OICHARD KENNEDY PATRICK KENNEY ALICIA KERRIGAN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Economics Political Science English 



TIMOTHY 
KERRIGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



PAMELA KETTLES 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / Philosophy 




LAURA KILEY TREACY ANN KILEY SHANNON 

5chool of Management Arts and Sciences KILKENNY 

Finance English/ Philosophy School of Nursing 

Nursing 



AUDREY KIM 

School of Management 
Finance 



BARBARA KING 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 363 



BRIAN KING 

Arts and Sciences 
Theater 




SETH KIRBY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




CHRISTOPHER 
KIRK 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics /Philosophy 




KERIN KLAGGES 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



DAVID KING 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics/ 
Political Science 



LAURA KING 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ROBERT KING 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SARAH KINSMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




CHRISTINE 

KLANIAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



MARGARET KLEIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



WALTER KNAPP 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



STUART KNOTT 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



364 Seniors 




PEDRO KNUTH 

School of Management 
General Management 




LOUIS KODUMAL 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 





ANDREA 
KONDRACKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophv 



HELEN KONG MILDRED KONRAD JOSHUA KORAN 

School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Accounting Philosophy English/Philosophy 



MICHELLE KORN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




KEVIN KOSH 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



VIVIAN KOT 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DANIEL KOUGHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Psychology 



JOELLE KOZMA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MAARTEN 
KRAAIJVANGER 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 365 




KRISTIN KREUDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



PETER KRIZ 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JOSEPH KROWSKI STEFANIE KRUSE 

Arts and Sciences School of Education 

Communication Early Childhood 



DEAN KUETER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




RICHARD ANJALI KUMAR NEELUM KUMAR 

KUHLMANN School of Management School of Management 

School of Management Accounting Marketing 
Economics / English 



ANNE KURTZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LISA KURTZON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



366 Seniors 




LDITH KUSZEWSKI 

Arts and Sciences 

English 



KIM KUTAWSKI 

Arts and Sciences 

En\'ironmental 
Geoloeiicil Science 



RICKY KWAK 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



KIMBERLY KWIAT 

School of Management 

Finance/ 
Operations Management 



JOHN LA GRATTA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




ANDREW LA KWAI LAN 

MANNA LUXANNE LAI 

school of Management School of Management 
Finance Accounting 



MICHELLE 
LALIBERTE 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



FAI LAM 

School of Management 
Finance 



GABRIEL 
LAMAZARES 

Arts and Sciences 
Theology 





MARIO LAMOTHE 

Arts and Sciences 
French /Theater 



JAMES LAMPARELLI 

School of Management 
Finance 




ANNE LANDFIELD 

Arts and Sciences 

Geology 



MICHAEL 
LANDOLPHI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 367 




BRIAN LANE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JENNIFER LANE 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 




KRISTINA LANE 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



KELLY LANG 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




Rough night, Dan Koughan? 




BENJAMIN LANTZ PAUL LANZON JEFFREY LAPLANTE 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 

Philosophy/ Accounting Marketing 
Political Science 



JON-PAUL 
LAPOINTE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



NICOLE LAPOTIN 

School of Education 
Human Development 




MARY LAPPIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Spanish 



CATHLEEN 
LAPYCHAK 

School of Management 
Accounting 



MICHELLE 
LAQUERRE 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



JOHN LARKIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



GINA LAROCCA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



368 Seniors 



TIMOTHY 
LAROVERE 

School of Management 



Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER 
LASALA 

School of Management 
Accounting 



CRISTINA LATTUGA 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication/ 

French 



JON LAUFENBERG 

School of Management 
Marketing 



KENT LAUREN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JOHN LAVAGNINO 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



STEPHEN LAVELLE 

Arts and Sciences 
History /Philosophy 



MEGAN LAWRENCE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



THOMAS LAWSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry 



JENNIFER LEAHY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




CARLOS LEAL 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 



JENNIFER LEDDY 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




DENISE LEDWARD 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



JAE LEE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




Bill Kushner, Michele Giordano, Adam Womack, Kevin 
Donovan, and Matt Bourke 



Seniors 369 




370 Seniors 




Seniors 371 



JAMES LEE JEANNE LEE JEANNIE LEE JENNIFER LEE 

School of Management School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Finance Marketing Finance Psychology 



JILL LEIBOWITZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




CHRISTOPHER 
LENGE 

School of Management 
Marketing 



JANE LENNON 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



GLENN 
LEONARD JR. 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



MARGARET 
LEONARD 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




ANNETTE LEONE 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



STEPHANIE 
LEONARD 

Arts and Sciences 
French 




JASON LEONG 

School of Management 
Accounting 




372 Seniors 




PAMELA LEVE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communica tion 



NICHOLAS LEVINS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



SUSAN LEWIS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LILLIANA LEYVA SANON LEZEAU 

School of Management School of Management 
Accounting Accounting 




-MARIA LIBERATO 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



LUCILLE LIEM 

School of Management 
Economics 



SACHATK LIEN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ANNE MARIE 
LIGDA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



BETHANY LIMA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 373 



KATHERINE 
LIMJOCO 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MARLO LINCOLN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



HEIDI LINDERT 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



DANA LISSY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



GARY LO 

School of Management 
Accounting 




JOHANNE 
LOCHARD 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Political Science 



JASON LOMAX 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Philosophy 



LAURIE LOMBARDI 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



SUSAN LONG 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 




KEITH LOWE 

School of Management 
Finance 



STACI LOWE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




KATHLEEN LOYSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



374 Seniors 



MAUREEN LUCAS 

School of Management 
Marketing 



CARISA 
LOPEZ-GALIB 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Maribei Bengoa, Mariel Arraiza, Beba Orsini, 
and Elaine Maldonado 




Anne Valente, Cindy Mierzejewski, Neila Fonseca, Mary Noonan, and 
Mary Huang enjoy Head of the Charles 1990. 




ROBERT LUCAS 

School of Management 
Accounting 




JOSEPH LUKAS 

School of Management 
Finance 




CHRISTOPHER LUPO JENNIFER 

School of Managen^ent LUTTRELL 

Accounting/ School of Management 

Information Systems Finance 




JON LYMAN 

Arts and Sciences 

English 



CHRISTINE LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CHRISTOPHER 
LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 




GEORGE LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JEFFREY LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



JOHN LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



MICHAEL LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



THOMAS LYNCH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 375 



JONATHAN LYONS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KARRIE LYONS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MICHAEL LYONS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 



KAREN LYTLE 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




NANCY 
MACELHINEY 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



Joe Saffire, Joe Lukas and Glenn Leonard Jr. ^7" 



WILLIAM MA 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 




COLLEEN 
MACDONALD 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




MAUREEN 
MACIONE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




ELINOR MACKIN 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MARYELLEN 
MACKINNON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



ALANA MADDEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



DEBORAH MADDEN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



STACEY MADDEN 

School of Education 
Human Development 



376 Seniors 



PETER MADDOCKS 

School of Education 
Human De\elopment 



WENDY MADIGAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DAVID MAESTRI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Mii 

NICHOLAS MAFFEO 

Arts and Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



SHEILA MAGEE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




JONATHAN 
MAGNER 

Arts and Sciences 

Psvcholo!a;v 



TIMOTHY MAGNER 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ERIN MAHAN 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication 




Christa Hainey and Dan O'Rourke catch the holiday 
spirit before the 1990 Christmas Semiformal. 



REZA MAHBAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DAVID MAHER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




DEBORAH MAHER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MAUREEN MAHON 

School of Management 
Accounting 




ERIC MAHONEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



LAUREN MAHONEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



Seniors 377 




MICHAEL MAHONEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art 




BRIAN MAHONY 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




Dan Ferrin, Tom Nolan, John-Paul LaPointe, Brian Pinheiro, Dave Cambria, Chris 
Fournier, Rich Minogue, Anthony Sileo, Mike Pimental and George Voegele 




SHEILA MAHONY ROSEANN MAIKIS MATTHEW MAIONA MICHAEL GINA MALANDRO I 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences MAKAITIS Arts and Sciences 

EngUsh Chemistry English School of Management Communication 

Finance 




ELAINE JENNIFER MALONEY RICHARD 

MALDONADO School of Management MALONEY 

School of Management Accounting Arts and Sciences 

Finance Communication 



JEFFREY MAMERA MARC MANAHAN p 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Accounting 



378 Seniors 



ELIZABETH 
MANALO 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



JAMES MANCINI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SANDRA MANCINI JAMES MANFIELD GINA 

Arts and Sciences School of Management MANFREDONIA 
Italian Marketing School of Management 

Accounting 




B. WILLIAM 
MANGANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



MICHAEL 
MANISCALCO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




BARBARA 

MANNING 

School of Management 

General Management 



OHN MANOUSSOFF DEAN MANUEL 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

History Political Science 



NICOLE MANNING TODD MANNIX 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Communication/ Marketing 
English 




JUDITH 
MARCELONIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LYDIA MARCOON 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Eileen Govekar and Helder Correia 
share a dance at Homecoming. 



Seniors 379 




380 Seniors 






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Seniors 381 





SUZANNE MARION 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MELANIE 
MARMION 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Anne Nathe, Richard Schroder, Kevin Keating 
and Lynette Alano 




MARIA MARQUES JENNIFER MARQUIJ 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Operations Management/ Political Science 

Philosophy 




JENNIFER 
MARSELLA 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



ADAM MARSHALL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics/English 



JORGE MARTEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MICHAEL 
MARTENS 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DONNA 
MARTENSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




CHRISTOPHER EDWARD MARTIN KRISTYN MARTIN MAUREEN MARTIN LISA MARTINAEU 

MARTIN Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences History English English Psychology 
Biology 



382 Seniors 



ANTONIO MARTINEZ DANA MARTINEZ TANYA MARTINO PAMELA MASKARA COLLEEN MASON 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Education 

Communication/ Biology /Psychology Economics /Philosophy Elementary Education Human Development/ 

Political Science English 




KATHRYN MASON RONALD MASSA ROMY MASSIE 

School of Education School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Elementary Education Marketing Political Science 



DAVID SCOTT MATARESE 

MASTROSTEFANO School of Management 

Arts and Sciences Marketing 
Psychology 




VLADIMIR JEAN 
MATHIEU 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 

Seniors 383 




THOMAS MATSON 

School of Management 
Marketing 




MAUREEN 
MATTHEWS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




The 4 Seasons and Mother Nature: Kelley Noreen, Michelle Kom, 
Tina Castellano, Stephanie Sayfie, and Amy Brown. 




MYRTISE MAURICE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



THOMAS MAWN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MARTIN MAXFIELD HEATHER MAZZEO 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Economics Marketing 



JEAN-CLAUDE 
MAZZOLA 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




ERIK MAZZONE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DAVID MAZZULLO 

School of Management 
Finance 



MARYLOU 
MCADAMS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



ERIN MCANDREW 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication/ 

English 



DANIEL 
MCAULIFFE 

School of Management 
Marketing 



384 Seniors 



JOHN MCCAFFREY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CRAIG MCCALL 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology/ 

Theology 



ALLEN MCCARTHY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



BRENDAN 
MCCARTHY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KEVIN MCCARTHY 

School of Management 
Accounting 




KEVIN MICHAEL 
MCCARTHY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



MICHAEL 
MCCARTHY 

School of Management 
Finance 




KATHRYN 
MCCAULEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KATHERINE 
MCCOLLOUGH 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History /History 




CATHERINE 


DAVID 


MCCONNELL 


MCCORMICK 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


English 


Spanish 



SHALEEN 
MCCARTHY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



WILLIAM 
MCCARTHY 

School of Management 
General Management 



RICHARD 
MCCARTIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




Seniors 385 



JOANNE MCCOURT STEPHEN MCCOY 

School of Education Arts and Sciences 

Secondary Education/ Communication 
English 



SABA MCCRARY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JOHN BARRY 
MCDONALD 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



KATHERINE 
MCDONALD 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




SEAN CHRIS MCENANEY JENNIFER MCENROE PATRICK TODD MCFARLAND 

MCDONOUGH Arts and Sciences School of Management MCFADDEN School of Management 

School of Management Economics Marketing School of Management Finance 

Finance Economics 




MARILYN MCFEELY 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



DONALD 
MCGANNON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JOHN MCGEE MARYBETH 

School of Management MCGILLION 

Accounting /English School of Education 

Elementary Education 




Sophomore year in Edmond's: Shane Jennings 
and Chris Kaczor. 



386 Seniors 



JAMES MCGOVERN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




MATTHEW BRENDAN 

MCGOVERN MCGOWAN 

School of Management School of Management 
Accounting Finance 



CHRISTOPHER 
MCGRATH 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



THOMAS 
MCGREGOR 

School of Management 
Finance 



JULIE MCHARDY 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



HOWARD MCHUGH 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




WAYNE MCILVAINE JOSHUA MCINTYRE 



School of Management 
Marketing 



Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 





JILL MCKEEN 

Arts and Sciences 
EngUsh 



MEGAN MCKEEVER 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



JULIET MCKENNA 

Arts and Sciences 
Geology 



MATTHEW 

MCKENNA 

Arts and Sciences 

History 



SUSAN MCKENNA 

Arts and Sciences 

English 



Seniors 387 



ELLEN MCKIERNAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JOHN 
MCLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 
Finance 




MELINDA 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



JULIANNE 
MCKINLEY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MICHAEL MCLANE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



STEPHEN MCLAREN 

School of Management 
Finance 




Liz Audino and Eric Pantano attend the 
sophomore Screw-Your-Roommate dance. 



CAITLYN 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




KEVIN 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




THOMAS I 

MCLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 
Finance / Operations 




JACKQUELINE 
MCLEAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



KARA MCLEAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



ERIN MCLOUGHLIN EUGENE MCMAHON 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

English Political Science 



JAMES 
MCMAHON III 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



388 Seniors 



MATTHEW 
MCMAHON 

Arts and Sciences 



English 



LEIGH ANN 
MCNAIR 



BRIAN MCMANUS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



JOSEPH RUSSELL MCMILLAN 

MCMENIMEN School of Management 

School of Management Accounting /General 
Marketing Management 



WILLIAM 
MCMURTRIE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




CRISTIN 
MCNAMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communicaton 



KARA MCNAMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MARY MCNAMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JE^^St 




'Tour dates beat one!" Mike MacNeill, Bill Evans, Jim Morrissey, 
Chris Gildea with Christine O'Brien before Homecoming. 




REBECCA 
MCNAMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Classics 




TIMOTHY 
MCNAMARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Marketing 




MICHELLE MCNEIL 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 389 




A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of Nature. -Ralph Waldo Emerson 




390 Seniors 




I breathed a song into the air, 
It fell to earth, I knew not where... 
And the song, from beginning to end, 
I found again in the heart of a friend. 

-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 




Seniors 391 




EUGENE MCNINCH 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




SUZANNE MCNISH 

Arts and Sciences 

English 




Joseph Kamara, Michelle Villiotte, Charlie Brennan and Lisa Santagate 




SHELLY MCPHEE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



HEATHER 
MCQUADE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JENNIFER 
MEADOWS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KIMBERLY 
MEAGHER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MARK 
MEISENBACHER 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 




GRETCHEN MELIA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



SHARON MELIUS 

School of Management 
Marketing / Psychology 



DEBORAH MELONI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JEANNE MENARD 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



LISA MENASIAN 

School of Management 

Secondary Education/ 

History 



392 Seniors 



CATHLEEN MENDES 

School of Education 
Human Dex'elopment 



CAROLINE 
MENDOZA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



VICTOR MENDOZA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



PAUL MENGEDOTH 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ANNEMARIE MEO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




ELIZABETH MEOLA SUZANNE MERCEIN KARI ANN MERCER DONNA MERHIGE SANDRA MERISIER 

School of Education Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Secondary Education/ History Communication/ English Communication 
Histor\- English 




KIMBERLY MEYER 

School of Management 
Marketing/ 
Philosophy 



Seniors 393 



CYNTHIA 
MIERZEJEWSKI 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



EDITH MILLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



LAUREN MILES 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



CRAIG MILFORD 

School of Management 
Marketing 



DAVID MILLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Spanish 



DONALD MILLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




JAMES MILLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



KATHRYN MILLER 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



MATTHEW MILLER 

School of Management 
Finance 



MICHAEL MILLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 





TRACEY MILLS 

School of Management 
Finance 




AKIKO MINAMI 

School of Management 
Accounting 



394 Seniors 




KELLIE MOAR 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



KARA MOHEBAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



NEGAR 
MOHTASHEMI 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




DAVID MINGEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication/ 
English 



ROBERT MITCHELL 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




SUZANNE MITCHELL 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

Pyschology 



DAVID 
MITTELMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




LISA MOISAN 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



MARK MOITOSO 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




CHRISTINE 
MONAHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



MAUREEN 
MONAHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy/ Political Sci. 



MICHAEL 
MONAHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



ANDREA 
MONSARRAT 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JOANITT MONTANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



Seniors 395 




CLAUDINE 
MONTENEGRO 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



CHRISTIAN 
MONTESI 

School of Management 
Finance 



CHRISTOPHER 
MONTGOMERY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LORENNA MONTIJO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



EMILY MOODY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




HELLENA MOON JENNIFER MOONAN ANNA MOONEY 

Arts and Sciences School of Nursing Arts and Sciences 

Political Science Nursing English 



JOHN MOONEY COLLEEN MOORE 

School of Management School of Management 
Accounting Finance 




KIMBERLY MOORE 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



ALICE MARIE 
MOORES 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




KATHERINE BRIAN MORAN 

MORALES School of Management 

School of Management Finance 
Marketing 




396 Seniors 




KYLE MORAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Econoniics 



DAVID MORFESI LYNN 

School of Management MORGANSTERN 
Marketing School of Management 

Marketing 



BARBARA 
MORIARTY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SUSAN MORIARTY 

Arts and Sciences 

History/ 

Politcal Science 




JEFFREY MORRELL DEAN MORRETTA 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing 



BRAIN MORRIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



KRISTIN MORRIS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MAURA MORSE 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



Seniors 397 




JESSICA MORTENSON 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

Psychology 




LIZABETH MOSES 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Spanish 




MEGAN MOUNT 

School of Education 
Human Development 



CONNIE MOY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LILY MOY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



PHILLIP MOY 

School of Management 
Operations Management 



MARYLYNNE 
MOYNIHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / Psychology 




WALDEMAR MOZES MICHELLE MROZEK 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Economics Communication/ 

Political Science 



JENNIFER MUGAR 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



MAUREEN 
MULCAHY 

Arts and Sciences 



TIMOTHY 
MULDOON 

Arts and Sciences 



Politcal Science Philosophy/Theology 



398 Seniors 



DANIEL MULKERN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MARY MULKERRIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Geology 



LAURA MULLANEY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



LISA MULLANEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



TRACY MULLARE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




PAUL MULLINS 

School of Management 
Finance 



MAURA 
MULLOWNEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KRISTEN MULVOY 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



BURT MUMMOLO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




ANTHONY 
MUNCHAK 

School of Management 
Finance /Info. Systems 




ROBERT MUNOZ 

School of Management 
Accounting 




IVETTE MURAI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 399 




400 Seniors 




What did I see ? 

Can I believe that what I saw that 
night was real and not just fantasy? 

-Bruce Dickinson 




Seniors 401 



DARON MURPHY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DOUGLAS MURPHY JENNIFER MURPHY 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
General Management English 



KEVIN MURPHY 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



NANCY MURPHY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




PAMELA MURPHY PATRICIA MURPHY RONALD MURPHY SCOTT MURPHY TIMOTHY MURPHY 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 

English /Philosophy Sociology Economics Finance Communication 






ELENA MURRAY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JAMES MURRAY 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




Sherry Vitters and Carla Fields 



REMEJA MURRAY STACEY MURRAY 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Psychology 



402 Seniors 





AMY MUSKA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



"Tank" Walsh, Ann Bauerlein, and Sloane Bendall 





SHAMAEL 
MUSTAFA 

School of Management 
Marketing 




MEGHAN 
MUTCHLER 

Arts and Sciences 
EngUsh 



KAMBO MWANGI 

School of Management 
Accounting 



JASON MYATT 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LEANNE MYERS 

School of Education 

Human Development 



LILY 
NAGARDEOLEKAR 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




GINA NAGLE 

Arts and Sciences 
Pohtical Science 




JOLIE NAHIGIAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English / French 



KRISTAN NALEZNY 

Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



PETER 
NAPOLITANO 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



JENNIFER NASSAR 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Seniors 403 



JOSE NASSAR 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



ANNE NATHE 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



GARRETT NAYLOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




WENDY NELSON CHRISTOPHER NEOS 

School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Mathematics 




CYNTHIA 
NERANGIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



GEOFFREY NERI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




ARTHUR NEDDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



MARY NEE 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



JONATHAN 
NEWKIRK 

Arts and Sciences 
Geology 



ELIN NEWTON 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




ELISABETH 
NEWTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER 

NEYLAN 

Arts and Sciences 

English 



DANA NG 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



404 Seniors 



DON NGUYEN 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

Mathematics 



NGUYEN NGUYEN 

School of Management 

Marketing/ 

Communication 



MONALISSA 
NICHOLS 

Arts and Sciences 
Commun. / Sociology 



MEGAN NICKELS LISA NICKERSON 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Marketing 




LISA NICOLAZZO 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



TERRI 
NIEDERMEYER 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




MICHAEL 
NOHRDEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry 



BRIAN NOLAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Music 




PAMELA NOLAN 

School of Education 
Human Deyelopment 



THOMAS NOLAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ELIZABETH 
NIELSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



SHEILA NILAN 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



CHANDRA NISBET 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




f Irene Sullivan, Sharon Ramos 
and Arati Sontakay 




Seniors 405 



LISA NOLLER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ALEXANDRA 
NOMIKOS 

Arts and Sciences 

Geology 

'Tfm 



MARY NOONAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



JOHN NORBERG 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



KELLEY NOREEN 

School of Management 
Finance 




KRISTEN NORRIS 

School of Management 
Finance 




MARYANNE 
NOWACK 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




LYNNE NOWAK 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



BARBARA 
NORTHCOTT 

Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art 



KATHLEEN KENNETH CHRISTOPHER 

NORTON NORWOOD NOVELLO 

School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Accounting Marketing English/Political Science 




406 Seniors 



MAUREEN NUGENT ELIZABETH NYMAN BRENDON O'BRIEN CHRISTINE O'BRIEN 

School of Management School of Management Arts aiid Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Marketing Economics EngUsh PoHtical Science 




K. JASMINE 
O'BRIEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




MAUREEN O'BRIEN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




Axl Rose and Slash hang out in a dorm room 
(Dan Koughan and Kara Friedman.) 



JAY O'BRIEN 

Arts and Sciences 
EngUsh / Philosophy 




KELSEY O'BRIEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




PATRICIA O'BRIEN 

Arts and Sciences 

Art History/ 
Political Science 




PATRICK O'BRIEN SUSAN O'BRIEN KELLY CECILIA O'CONNELL DEBORAH 

Arts and Sciences School of Management O'CALLAGHAN Arts and Sciences O'CONNELL 

Marketing School of Management Political Science School of Management 

Marketing Accounting 



PoUtical Science 



Seniors 407 




COLLEEN 
O'CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




EDWARD 
O'CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / Philosophy 




Russell Ayan, Bryan Hawkom, Adam Marshall, 
Rob Whitton and Joe Ryan 





EILEEN O'CONNOR 

School of Management 
Marketing 



JOHN O'CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



KATHLEEN 
O'CONNOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



KELLY O'CONNOR 

School of Management 

Finance/ 
General Management 



LINDA O'CONNOR 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




THERESA THOMAS O'CONNOR MARY O'DOHERTY MICHAEL O'GRADY ANDREW O'HARA 

O'CONNOR School of Management School of Nursing Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Arts and Sciences Finance Nursing English Marketing 
English/Philosophy 



408 Seniors 





PAUL O'HARA 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



BRENDAN O'KEEFE 

School of Management 
Finance 



ERIN O'KEEFE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SHAUNA O'KEEFE 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



I 

JULIE O'LOUGHLIN ADRIAN O'MALLEY 

I Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

I History Biology 




JENNIFER 
O'MALLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JOSEPH O'MALLEY KEVIN O'MALLEY 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Finance /Philosophy 




TV7CTPv-»'< <; fT^W ^ ^>C><gX-*y - ■•: : i^^,^^X..wflea3«BM«SmHS"tf*Ka3I!r'-tK: 





Matt Nink and Joan Ruffino-Nink 





CHRISTINA O'NEILL 

School of Education 
Human Development 





DANIEL O'ROURKE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / History 



Seniors 409 




410 Seniors 




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Seniors 411 



THOMAS O'SHEA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ELIZABETH O'TOOLE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



GREGORY OBLOY 

School of Management 
Finance 



JOI OKADA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / Philosophy 




JOHN O'TOOLE 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 



JOSEPH O'TOOLE 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JAMES OBERMAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




DIANE OLNEY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



412 Seniors 



ANNMARIE OLSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JESSICA OLSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



NICOLE OLSON LISA OLSTA 

School of Management School of Managemeni 
Operations Management Marketing 




NAYOMI OMURA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biolog)' 



LAURIE OPOZDA 

School of Nursing 



Nursing 




PAUL OREFICE 

Arts and Sciences 
I Communication 



EUGENIA ORSINI 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




*m Michael Ryan and Paul Schneider 





LISA OSTAPKO 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



JANICE OWEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JAMES OWENS 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MARCUS OZAETA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



ELIZABETH PACE 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

Communication 




PAUL PAK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DAVID PALMIERI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KELLIE LYNN 
PALUCK 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



FARANAK 
PANAHBARHAGH 

School of Management 
Accounting 



LEIGH PANEK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 413 



NELSON PANIAGUA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JASON PANOS 

Arts and Sciences 

Econmics / Politcal 

Science 



FRANK PANSINI 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ERIC PANTANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry 



JOSEPH PAOLINO 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




KIRK PAPA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




ANDREW KEVIN PARCHINSKI JASON PARDO JENNIFER PARENT! 

PAPANICOLAU School of Education School of Management Arts and Sciences 

School of Management Human Development Finance Economics i 
Finance / Marketing 



LOUISE PARENT 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Sciences 




JAIMINI PARIKH 

School of Managment 
Marketing 





Donna and Debbie Voipe, the evil stepsisters, force Cinderella, Jane Sparks, 

to sweep their kitchen floor. 



414 Seniors 




LORl PARRIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DAVID PARSONS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics /Germanic 

Studies 




iANDRA PARSONS AJAY PATEL 

School of Nursing School of Management 
Nursing Computer Science/ 

Finance 




Erin Hurley and Mike Zilis are on their way to the 
Junior Spring Semiformal. 




CHRISTOPHER 
PATERNOSTER 

khool of Management 



Finance 



CORY PATRICK 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



JENNIFER PAUL 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics / Physics 



CATHERINE 
PAULHUS 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



GARY PAULL 

School of Management 
Finance / Mathematics 




HELEN PAULOS 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



MICHELLE PAXTON 

School of Management 
Marketing 



JENNIFER PECK 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



TRICIA PELNIK 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DYAN PELOSI 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 415 



MATTHEW 
PENARCZYK 

School of Management 
Economics 



SANDRA PENNELL 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



DAVID PENTZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



DAVID PEREIRA CARLOS PEREZ 

School of Management School of Management 

Finance/Operations Human Resources 
Management 





Sue Hall, Kim Hurley and Michelle Sylvester carry the 
Eagle off the football field before the halftime show. 




LUCIANA PERINETT 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




LAURA PERLINI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




ANN PERO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ROBERT PERREAULT 

School of Management 
Marketing 



JILL PERRY 

Arts and Sciences 
Spanish 



CAMILLE PERUGINI 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



MEREDITH 
PETERSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



416 Seniors 





KELLY PETERSON 

School of Management 
Finance 



LINDA PETERSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



IT 




Lynn Amato and Oscar Piedad are enjoying 
themselves at one of 1863's wild parties. 



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MARGARET 
PETERSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics / English 



DAVID PETRARCA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 




KRISTINE PETRINI 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JEFFREY PETRUSKA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



REGINA PETSCHE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DANIELLE PETTINE 

Arts and Sciences 

Communication / 

Political Science 



JOSEPH PEZZA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




SUSAN PFAU 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



DANNELLE MIMI 
PHAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



MICHAEL PHELAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Music 



PAUL PHIFER 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



ANNEMARIE 
PHILLIPS 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



Seniors 417 



LAURA LEE 
PICCIANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology / Economics 



CRAIG PICCIRILLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




RENEE PIKE 

Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy / Political 

Science 



JASON PINES 

School of Management 
Finance 




BRIAN MICHAEL MICHAEL PISATURO 
PINHEIRO Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences English 

Political Science 



ALISA PICERNO 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



OSCAR PIEDAD 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



LISBETH PIFKO 

School of Management 
Economics 





JENNIFER PLOURDE 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



PHILIP POLIMENO PATRICK POLJAN JENNIFER POMPEO 

School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Finance Finance /Operations English /Political Science 

Management 



KIM PORCELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Theater 



418 Seniors 




ROBERT POTHIER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



Chris Fleissner, Jim Singer, Bob Munoz, Rob Johnson and Dave Gesmondi 




TINA POTUTO ANNA POWELL ELIZABETH POWER CAROLE POWERS 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Economics Marketing English Mathematics 



CHRISTOPHER 
POWERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




GURDON POWERS JOHN POWERS JAYANT PRABHU 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Communication Marketing Political Science 



MICHAEL PRATT 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



PAMELA 
PRENDERGAST 

School of Education 
Childhood/Psychology 



Seniors 419 






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420 Seniors 





Seniors 421 



JILL PRIMO 

School of Management 
Finance 



JAMALH PRINCE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DOUGLAS 
PRINCIOTTA 

School of Management 
Finance 



NICOLE PRIOLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



ANTONIO PULSONE 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




KEVIN PULTE 

Arts and Sciences 
History / Philosophy 



TIMOTHY PUOPOLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LISA PURTELL 

Arts and Sciences 
English / French 



KRISTEN PUSEY PHILIP QUATROCHI 

School of Education Arts and Sciences 

Middle School /History Econcomis/Enghsh 




Kerry Tighe, Kim EUwein, Hilary Wald, Dina Cannalonga and Jennifer Nassar 




MARGARET 
QUIGLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




ERIN QUILL 

School of Management 
Finance 



422 Seniors 



LAURIE QUINN 

Arts and Sciences 
Entrlish 



MARY RAAB 

Arts and Sciences 

Political Science/ 

Russian 



JOCELYN RABADAM 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



CONSTANCE 
RACANELLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



PATRICIA LYN MARIA RAFFINAN 

RAFFA Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences Philosophy /Political 
Econonucs/Philosophy Science 



CHRISTINA 
RAGAZZI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



LAURA RACK 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




CHRISTINE RADER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MARK RADZIK 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KIMBERLY RAIA 

School of Management 
Accounting 



SHARON RAMOS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology / Psychology 



Seniors 423 




KEVIN RAPPA 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics / Political 

Science 



Suzi McNish, Jen Moonan, Amy Glowacki, Heidi Lindert 
and Amy Ryberg are feasting on a nutritious brunch. 




MARK RASMUSSEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JASON RATHBONE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KIMBERLY 
RAYMOND 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CECELY REARDON 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



DAVID RECTOR 

School of Managment 
Economics/Finance 




JAMES REDMOND 

School of Management 
General Management 



GREGORY REED 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ROBERT REESE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



KRISTEN REGAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



CHARLES REGO 

School of Management a 
Finance 



424 Seniors 



DOUGLAS REH CHRISTOPHER 

School of Management REHM 

Operations Management School of Management 

Finance 



BRIAN REID 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DONALD REID JULIA REID 

School of Management School of Management 
Accounting Political Science 





JASON REILLY 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




PATRICK REILLY 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics/ 
Mathematics 




LISA REINHARDT 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



MELINDA RENA 

School of Education 
Human Development 



THOMAS RENDA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



STEPHANIE RESZ 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



CARLA REVILLA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 425 




ANA-MARIA REYES 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



RONNA PAZ REYES 

School of Management 
Accounting 




YOHANNA 
RHODES 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DOROTHEA RICCI 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 





KAREN RICCIARDI ANTHONY STEVEN RIERA JOHN RIJO ALYSSA RILEY 

Arts and Sciences RICUPERO School of Management School of Management School of Management 

Mathematics School of Management Accounting Finance Marketing 
Accounting/Economics 




MARY RILEY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



KAREN RIMMELE 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Philosophy 



DANIEL RINZEL 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KATE RIORDAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



NATALIE RIOS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



426 Seniors 



HEATHER MARIA RIVERA- JANEEN RIVERS ALEXIS RIZZUTO 

RISTUCCIA ORTIZ School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences General Management English 



Physics 



History 



CHRISTOPHER 
ROBBINS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




ELLIE ROBERTS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



CARAGH 
ROCKWOOD 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



RICHARD ROBERTS 

School of Management 
Accounting 



HEATHER 
ROBINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 



JACQUELINE 
ROBINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



NOELLE ROBINSON 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




Seniors 427 



KEVIN ROCQUE 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 



ELAINA RODOLAKIS 

School of Education 
Middle School 



ANABEL 
RODRIGUEZ 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



BRADLEY ROE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DESMOND ROHAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 




LUZ ROJAS 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



EUGENIA ROLLA DESIREE ROMAN JANINE ROMANELLI JENNIFER ROMANO 

Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Education Arts and Sciences 

History Elementary Education Elementary Education Economics 




JONATHAN 
ROMANO 

School of Management 
Accounting / Sociology 



SAMUEL ROMEO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




TARA ROMEO RICHARD 

School of Management RONDANO 

General Management School of Management 

Finance 




428 Seniors 





J. CHADWICK ROPER HILLARY ROSCOE 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biology/ Political Finance 

Science 




CLARE ROSE 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



JANET ROSELL 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




MELODY ROSIER 
EDNER 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



DARA ROSOFF 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



DAVID ROSOW AMY ROSS FREDERICK ROSS 

Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 

English /Philosophy Human Development Economics 




MARIA ROTONDI 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



ELLEN ROY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LOUIS RUBANO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JAMIE RUBIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




EVANGELINE 
RUEBEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 429 



JOAN RUFFINO 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



KIRK RUOFF 

School of Management 
Marketing 



BRIAN RUSSAK 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



NICOLE RUSSO 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

Psychology 



MARY RUTTER 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




CHRIS RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



EDWARD RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



JOSEPH RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




KATHERINE RYAN 

School of Education 
Human Development/ 

English 



MICHAEL RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




PATRICK RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



WILLIAM RYAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




AMY RYBERG 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ALLEN SABIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



432 Seniors 



lOSEPH SAFFIRE 


SUSAN SAJDA 


STEPHEN SAKS 


KATHLEEN 


RAYMOND 


jchool of Management 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts anci Sciences 


SAMMATARO 


SANTANGELO 


Finance 


Psychology 


Biology 


Arts and Sciences 
Communication 


Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




TODD SANTORA 

School of Management 

Economics 



CAROL SANTORO 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




FRANK SANTORO STEPHEN SANTORO FRANCIS SANZONE 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management 



Psychology 



PoUtical Science 



Accounting 



ELIZABETH 
SARDELLA 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



ROBERT SARDINHA 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 433 




JANET SARKISSIAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




ANDREW SARNO 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 




ROBERT SARVIS 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Studio Art 



BRIAN SAUNDERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



CHRISTOPHER 
SAUNDERS 

School of Management 
Accounting 



CHRISTINE SAVERY TERESA SAVINO 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Accounting 




LAURA SAWYER STEPHANIE SAYFIE BRIAN SCALETTA 

School of Management Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Marketing Communication Mathematics 



JAMES SCAMBY 

School of Management 
Finance 



PETER SCAMMELL 

Arts and Sciences 
French 



434 Seniors 




CLAUDIA 
SCAPICCHIO 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



STEPHEN 
SCARDINO 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



ROBERT SCARO ELIZABETH SCHACK SUSAN MICHELLE 

Arts and Sciences School of Education SCHAEFER 

English/ Human Development School of Education 

Communication Secondary Ed. /Math 




DAWN SCHANNEN 

Arts anci Sciences 
Economics 



HANS SCHEMMEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ELISA 
SCHEUERMANN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




STEPHEN 
SCHLAGETER 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



LISA SCHMITT 

School of Education 
Human Development 



LORI SCHNEIDER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




PAUL SCHNEIDER 

School of Management 
Accotmting 



RENE SCHNEIDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ANDREW 
SCHMIDBAUER 

Arts and Sciences 
History /Spanish 




Seniors 435 



WALTER 
SCHNEIDER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JENNIFER 
SCHOFIELD 

School of Managennent 
Finance 



CHRISTOPHER 
SCHONHOFF 

Arts and Sciences 
BioloE 



JAMES SCHORR 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



RICHARD 
SCHRODER 

School of Management 

Finance 




BRADLEY 
SCHROEDER 

School of Management 
Accounting 



INGRID 
SCHROFFNER 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Philosophy 



JULIA SCHULL 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MICHAEL SCHUNK 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 



ALEXANDRA 
SCHURZ 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Philosophy 




DARREN 
SCHWIEBERT 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



436 Seniors 



DEANNA 
SCIARETTA 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




DINA SCLAFANI 

School oi Manatrement 
Human Resources 




STEVEN SCOTT 

Arts and Sciences 
English 





LAURA SELFORS 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




MICHAEL SCOPA 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 




THOMAS SECAUR 

School of Management 
Accounting/ Finance 




CHRISTINE 
SENALDI 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 



TAMMY SEPECK 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



SHUI LUN SETO ANDREA SETTANNI 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Economics English 




CHRISTINA SEVILLA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ERIN SHAFFER 

Arts and Sciences 
Fiistory 



RICHARD SHAMON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ELIZABETH 
SHANLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



WILLIAM 
SHAUGHNESSY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 437 



ANDREW SHEA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



DEBRA SHEA 

School of Management 
Marketing 




KERRY SHEA 

School of Education 

Human Development/ 

English 



ROSEANN SHEEHAN KRISTINE SHEEHY RICHARD SHEEHY 



Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



School of Management 
Marketing 



MATTHEW 
SHELDON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




RACHEL SHERIDAN EDWARD 

Arts and Sciences SHERMAN JR. 

English School of Management 

Finance 



CECILIA SHIN STEPHEN SHOPBELL MICHAEL SHOULE 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Biology Operations Management 



438 Seniors 



CHARLES SHULL BONNIE LEE SHUM MARIA VINCENT ANN SILBERNAGEL 

Arts and Sciences School of Management SIGNORELLA SINGORELLO School of Management 

Political Science Accounting/Marketing School of Management School of Management Human Resources 

Accounting Marketing 




KEVIN SILEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



ANTHONY SILEO CHERYL SILVA MICHAEL SILVA KRISTA SIL VERIO 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 

Mathematics Psychology Accounting Marketing 




Aloha! Tom Wilcox, Bonnie Fong and Pete Napolitano 






SUSAN SIMMONS 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




LANA SIMONIAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 439 




440 Seniors 




Seniors 441 



KATHERINE 
SIMPSON 

School of Education 
Secondary Ed. /English 



CHERYL SIMRANY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



KARIN SIMS 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



STACY ANNE SIMS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




A. ELIZABETH 
SINGER 

School of Management 
Economics/Marketing 



JAMES SINGER 

School of Management 
Finance 





RICHARD SINOPOLI 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kelly Flynn, Deanne England and Liz Audino prepare 
to watch the sunset behind Rick's Cafe in Jamaica. 




ANN SISK 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



DAVID SLINEY 

School of Management 
Economics 



CHRISTINE SLOAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ADAM SLOSBERG 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 



CHARLES SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



442 Seniors 




EDWARD SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Theater 



HEATHER SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




HEATHER SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



KAREN SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




Natasha Gaujean, Danielle Voipe and Caria Fields m 



:-ar 




MARY SMITH RICHARD SMITH 

School of Management School of Management 

Computer Science 



Accounting 



RONALD SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



SHAWNA SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



STACY SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




TREVOR SMITH 

Arts and Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



TIMOTHY SMYTH 

Arts and Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



MONICA 
SNOWDEAL 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



GEOFFREY 
SOMERVILLE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



SUSAN SOMLYODY 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 443 




KEITH SOMMERS ARATI SONTAKAY MAGDALENA JAMS SORBELLO EMILY SORBLOM 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences SONVILLE School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Psychology English School of Management Marketing Chemistry 

Marketing 




KRISTIN SOUKUP 

Arts and Sciences 
Bioethics 



MARY SOUSA 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



STEPHANIE SOUSA DIMA SOUSOU STEVEN SOUZA 

School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences 
Accounting Finance Economics /Computer 

Science 




LISA SPAGNUOLO 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JENNIFER 
SPAZIANO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




BRIAN SPELLMAN CASSANDRA 

Arts and Sciences SPENCER 

Sociology School of Management 

General Management 




Amy Ryberg finds a spooky friend at Fanueil Hall 



444 Seniors 



JOHN SPENCER 

x'hool of NLinatrement 
Finance 



NANCY SPENCER 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



SUSAN SPENCER 

School of Management 
Marketing 




ELIZABETH 
SPILLANE 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



JENNIFER SPROUT 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



RAYMOND SPURR 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 




LIZABETH SRIUBAS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 





NICOLE STACHOW 

School of Niirsing 
NLirsing 



LESLEY STALEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art 



DONNA STALTER 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ANDREA STAMP 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MICHELLE STANISZ 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Seniors 445 



MARY ELLEN 
STANKEWICK 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



COLE STANTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



MAUREEN 
STANTON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MICHAEL STANTON MICHELLE STARK 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

History Psychology 




KARA 
STAUNTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



WILLIAM 
STEFANOWICZ 

School of Management 
Info. Systems /Operations 




MARY CALE STONE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



MARY FRANCIS 
STRABEL 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




THOMAS 
STRACHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



DINA STRADA 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



SEAN STEPHEN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LAUREN STEWART JENNIFER 

Arts and Sciences STOLPMAN 

Communication School of Management : 

Accounting 




446 Seniors 




ENNIFER STRAILEY MIA TANYA STULA 

Arts and Sciences School of Education 

English Human Development 




DEBRA SULLIVAN DENNIS SULLIVAN 

School of Management School of Management 
Information Systems General Management 




"Executive Council of Cross-Dressers" 
Kim Bahs, Kevin Anderson, and Matt Sheldon. 




EUGENE SULLIVAN IRENE SULLIVAN 

Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences 

Biology Communication 



JAMES SULLIVAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JAMES SULLIVAN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



ROBERT SULLIVAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




SHEILA SULLIVAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



SHELLY 
SUMMERTON 

School of Education 
Human Development 



DAVID SCOTT SUNDSTROM 

SUNDERHAFT Arts and Sciences 

School of Management Mathematics 

Finance 



PASQUALEEN 
SUPLER 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Seniors 447 




CHRISTOPHER 
SURRICHIO 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




GINENE SUTTON 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



KELLIE SUTTON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




Nicole Bloch, Janet Kane, Heather Woodard, Ceci O'Connell, 
Sue O'Brien, and Christine Venezia 





KATHERINE 
SVIOKLA 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JASON SWEPSON 

School of Education 
Human Development 



MICHELLE 
SYLVESTER 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



CRYSTAL LYNN 
SYLVIA 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




THERESA 
SZCZUREK 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



MICHELE 
SZUMIGALA 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JOSEPHINE TABET 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



KEVIN TAFFE 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



BRIAN TAGGART 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



448 Seniors 



IPATRICIA TALARICO 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



AMY TALSKY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MARY TAMISIEA 

Arts anci Sciences 
Communication 



LYNN TANKSLEY 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



AMY TAPPER 

Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry 




TRACY TARBY 

Arts and Sciences 
English / Psychology 



DIONNE TARKA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



MICHAEL TARLIN 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



MARLA TAVERNI 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 




CHRISTOPHER 
TAYLOR 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




FRANK MATTHEW 
TAYLOR 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



j Akiko Minami, Shawn Traylor and Stacey Murray 





KATHLEEN TAYLOR 

School of Management 
General Management 



Seniors 449 
























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450 Seniors 





Seniors 451 




ALBERT TEBBETTS 

School of Management 
Marketing / English 



GEOFFREY TEEHAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JASON TEHONICA 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



THOMAS TEICH 

School of Management 
Accounting 



TODD TEIXEIRA 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




DAO THACH 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



REENA THADHANI 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JENNIFER 
THEOPHILE 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MARY TRIES 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



JOSEPH THISSELL 

School of Management 
Operations Management 



452 Seniors 



KELLY THOMAS KEVIN THOMAS LUCIA THOMAS TIMOTHY THOMAS 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Management 
Biology Accounting Human Development Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER 
THOMPSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 




GREGORY 
THOMPSON 

Arts anci Sciences 
English 



KIMBERLY 
THOMPSON 

School of Education 
Elemntary Education 



MICHELLE 
THOMPSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 



LAURIE THOMSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MICHELLE 
THOMSON 

School of Management 
Economics /Philosophy 




SHERYL TIERNEY THOMAS TIERNEY 

Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Finance 



Mike Galvin, Melanie Creole, Louise 
Terciak and Craig Watchmaker 



Seniors 453 




Nguyen Nguyen, Martin Penning, Gina LaRocca, Chad Smith and Kiana Ledward 




HEIDI TIETENBERG 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




KERRY TIGHE 

School of Management 
Finance 




ANDREW TIMPSON CHRISTINA TING KENNETH TOBIAS 

Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Mathematics Marketing Finance 



KEVIN TOBIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



JEANNINE TODD 

Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 




ALLISON TOLOCKA JOSEPH TOMEI RALPH TOMEI 

School of Management School of Management School of Management 
Operations Management Economics /Finance Marketing /Philosophy 



LAURA TONER 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



MARYBETH TORAN 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



454 Seniors 



CARLOS TORO VANESSA TORRES KAREN TORTORICI 

School of Management School of Management School of Management 
Information Systems/ Accounting Finance 

Philosophy 



LAURIE TOTH 

Arts and Sciences 
English /Theater 



KRISTENE TOUFAS 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




MICHAEL TOWERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



CHRISTINA TRACY SANG TRAN COSIMO TRAPANI SHAWN TRAYLOR 

Arts and Sciences School of Management Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Philosophy Finance English /Philosophy Accounting 




NICHOLAS TRIANT 

School of Management 
Computer Science 




CHRISTOPHER 
TRZASKA 

Arts and Sciences 
English/Philosophy 





Kay Ryan, Laurie Walsh, Heather Mazzeo and 
Laurie Toth build a snowman. 






STEVEN TSEKI 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



Seniors 455 



KRISTEN TSOLIS 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



MICHAEL TULLIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science 



DAVID TULLY 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



GARY TUMA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



ERIKA TURNQUIST 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




ANNE VALENTE 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



SHIRLEY VALERY 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



BARBARA 
VANDERKIEFT 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



CHRISTINE 
VANDEWETERING 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ALEXANDER 
VANTARAKIS 

School of Management 
Finance 



456 Seniors 





JENNIFER 
VANVLIET 

Arts and Sciences 



Philosophy 




THEODORE 
VARIPATIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




GERARD VARNUM CHRISTOPHER LEIGH VAUGHAN WILSON VAZQUEZ JENNIFER VENDICE 

School of Education VASSILOPOULOS Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Nursing 

Human Development Arts and Sciences Psychology Marketing Nursing 

History 




ANGELA VENEZIA 

School of Education 

Elementarv Education 



CHRISTINE 
VENEZIA 

Arts and Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



MICHELLE VERDIEU 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



PAULA VIEIRA 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



ELIZABETH VIHLEN 

Arts and Sciences 
History / Philosophy 



Seniors 457 




JOSEPH VIJUNGCO 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



NANCY 
VILLANUEVA 

School of Management 
Marketing 



JAMES VILLIOTTE 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



MICHELLE 
VILLIOTTE 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 




JACQUELYN 
VIRGILIO 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




FRANCESCA 
VISCONI 

School of Management 
Business Administration 




SUZANNE 
VINCIGUERRA 

Arts and Sciences 
Art History 




CENCE VIRNA 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Bl 



Barry McDonald gets a kiss from Lisa NoUer 
before the St. Valentine's Day Dance 1991. 




SHERRY VITTERS 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 




JOELY VIZARD 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology / Psychology 



GEORGE VOEGELE 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



DANIELLE VOLPE 

School of Education 
Human Development 



DEBORAH VOLPE 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



DONNA VOLPE 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



458 Seniors 



RICHARD VON 
FELDT 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



FRANCIS VOTTA 

School of Management 
Finance 



CHRISTOPHER 
WAGNER 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



KATHLEEN WAHLIG 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

English 



JAMES 
WAINWRIGHT 

Arts and Sciences 
Phil. /Political Science 




MELANIE WAKS 

School of Education 
Human Development 



CHRISTINE 
WALCZYK 

School of Management 
Finance 




PAUL WALDRON 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



ANDREA WALHEIM 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




JOSEPH WALKER MARK WALKER 

School of Management School of Management 

Human Resouces/ Accounting 
Philosophy 



HILARY WALD 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



ERICA WALDRON 

Arts and Sciences 
Mathematics 



KEVIN WALDRON 

Arts and Sciences 
Physics 




Seniors 459 





The earth is all before me. With a heart 
Joyous, nor scared at its own liberty 
I look about; and should the chosen guide 
Be nothing better than a wandering cloud, 
I cannot miss my way. I breathe again! 

-William Wordsworth 



460 Seniors 





We can't return - we can only 
look behind from where we 
came and go round and round 
and round in the circle game. 
-Joni Mitchell 



Seniors 461 





Malena Amato, Erin Graef e, Meg Allen, Anne Tierney and Steph Sayfie 




MARC WALL 

School of Management 
Finance / Marketing 




MAUREEN WALL 

School of Management 
Finance 




JOHN WALSH 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



LAUREN WALSH 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



NOREEN WALSH 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



PETER WALSH 

Arts and Sciences 
Sociology 



BRIAN WALTERS 

Arts and Sciences 

English/ 
Political Science 




ALISON WALTON JOAN WANG KELLY WANSER CAROLINE WARD JENNIFER WARD 

Arts and Sciences School of Education Arts and Sciences School of Education Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Human Development Economics/Philosophy Human Development Political Science 



462 Seniors 



CRAIG 
WATCHMAKER 

School of Management 
Accounting 



CHARLES WATERS ANDREW WATSON 



Arts and Sciences 
History 



Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



NICOLE WAX 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



NICOLE WEBSTER 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

History 




ANDREW 
WEDMORE 

Arts and Sciences 

Political Science 



ERIKA WEED 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



RONALD WEED 

Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 



CHRISTINE WEINER WHITNEY WELLS 

School of Management School of Management 
Accounting/ Marketing 

Philosophy 




DOUGLAS 
WENNERS 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



RON WESSEL 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 463 




V .>^^ 



KRISTIN WEST 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



JENNIFER WEYMAN 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




THOMAS WHALEN 

School of Management 
Accounting 



DEIRDRE WHELAN 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




Rob Monoz, Chris Fleissner, Jim Singer and John 
Henderson attempt to get some fresh air. 




LORI WHELAN 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



KIMBERLY WHICHER GREGORY WHITE 

School of Management School of Management 
Marketing Finance 



TRICIA WHITNEY 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



ROBERT WHITTON 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




THOMAS WILCOX 

School of Management 
Accounting 



BRUCE WILKINSON 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



MICHAEL 
WILLIAMS 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



RICHARD 
WILLIAMS 

School of Management 
Marketing 



KATHARINE WILLIS 

Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



464 Seniors 



DAVID WILSON 

School ot Manatrement 
Accounting/ Finance 



DON WILSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Geology 



JULIE WILSON 

School of Education 
Early Chilhood 



MEAGAN WILSON 

Arts and Sciences 
Communication 



ANTHONY WING 

School of Management 
General Management/ 
Philosophy 




DAVID WIRIN 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



ANNMARIE WIXON 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



MARK 
WOLFINGTON 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



SUZANNE WOLK 

School of Management 

Accounting 



SANDRA WON 

Arts and Sciences 
English 



Seniors 465 



MEI LIN WONG 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



YVONNE WONG 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics/ 
Mathematics 



DERRICK WOOD 

School of Education 
Middle School 



SCOTT WOOD TODD WOOD 

School of Management School of Education 
Marketing Human Development 




HEATHER 
WOODARD 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



JOHN WOODS CHRISTIAN WRIGHT LAUREN WRIGHT 

School of Management School of Management Arts and Sciences 

Marketing/ Marketing Psychology 
Communication 



BRETT WYARD 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




KATHERINE WYLES 

School of Education 

Special Needs 
Childhood Education 




CYNTHIA XENAKIS 



Philosophy 



466 Seniors 




MICHAEL XIFARAS 

Arts and Sciences 
History 




CHRISTOPHER 
YEOMANS 

School of Management 

Finance 




DONNA YNAYA 

Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



BRIAN YEE 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 



LISA YEE CHANG-HO YEH NANCY YENCHKO 

School of Management School of Management School of Nursing 
Accounting Marketing Nursing 





SCOTT YERARDI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 




CHARLENE YOUNG 

Arts and Sciences 
English 




CHRISTOPHER 
YOUNG 

School of Management 
Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER 
YOUNG 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 



LEIANNA YOUNG 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



SHANNON YOUNG 

School of Education 

Human Resources/ 

Operations Management 



KARMINE YU 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Seniors 467 



'5* "^ p? 




KEITH YUEN 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

History 



MARIETTA 
ZACHARAKIS 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KRISTEN ZALESKI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



DIANNE ZAMPICENI 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



KIM ZEDOWER 

Arts and Sciences 
Political Science 




ROBIN ZETARSKI 

School of Education 

Secondary Education/ 

Mathematics 




FRANCIS ZIDAR 

Arts and Sciences 
Biology 





KAREN ZIEMBA MICHAEL ZILIS MARK ZINSKI 

School of Management School of Management School of Management 
Economics Accounting /Finance Economics /English 



OTTO ZOLL 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



TODD ZUCCOLI 

Arts and Sciences 
Economics 



468 Seniors 




Seniors 469 




7?j 




rg/-: 



The staff of Sub Turri would like to extend its immense gratitude to the 

parents, friends, faculty members, and alumni who contributed to the 

1992 Sub Turri. Thank you for making this book possible! 



GOLT) (PSIIXP^ 



Mr. & Mrs. Carmen ^ruce Meed 

Mr. & Mrs. ^rnie Anastos 

Mr. & Mrs. Lon ^Anderson 

'T. Cfiris Angtiont 

%gbtrt & Mona Siyan 

Mr. & Mrs. Jofin 'Batck 

Mr. & Mrs. (PauCW. (Beftz 

^Sert ^. 'BeuerCein 

'RpSertJ.'Btackter 

Mr. & Mrs. ^chard Boccaccio 

Mr. & Mrs. Lazvrence fA. (Bossidy 

(Dr. & Mrs. Irvin T>. (Bougfi 

Mr. & Mrs. James (Boyte 

(Dr. & Mrs. WiCCiam L. (Bresonis 

SHeCia M. Curtis 

l^homas £. (Burns 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Casfiman 

Margaret burden Chitds 
(Dr. & Mrs. 'Tfiomas M. Connor 

^he biennis (famiCy 

Mr. & Mrs. (HaraCdS. "De^pp 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. (Devin 

Victor & Hipse Marie (Diaso 

T,dzvardT. & Mary Ann (Dozud 

WiCCiam & Joan 'Elder 
(Drs. Jose & SteCCa EvangeCista 

Mr. & Mrs. Qeorge "Lyde 
Mr. & Mrs. l^homas £. Jahey 
4:7 A Patrons CecUia & Jofin J. (FarreCC, Jr. 



Tfr. & Mrs. ']{, ^auf'Jenzf 

Mr. & Mrs. "Danid'Ji, 7inn, Jr. 

Lana J^tynn 

^e (^otdens- Chris jMaureen, 

CoCCeen & Laureen 

Tfr & Mrs. :Hozuard1{, QouCd 

"Dr. & Mrs. 0\[,g. Qranados 

O^lancy & "PhUip griffitfi 

Mr. & Mrs. %ayj. groves 

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Jiays 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee iA. Oiiitunen 

James S. Oiughes 

"Dr. & Mrs. John £. 9{unt 

John & (Deanna ^ynattslqf 

liichard'L. & %athryn L. Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. Joey %ang 

Joe & ginny 9(i[ey 

(Dr. & Mrs. %yo A. %im 

%arij. & Janice L. %^rtz 

Mr. & Mrs. J^rancis J. La^vere 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Lavagnino III 

Mr. & Mrs. (Domenic %. Leve 

9{ancy & 'Bitt Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack^g. Mancuso 

Mr. & Mrs. (Donald J. Martineau 

T)r. & Mrs. John "PautMcgee II 

Mr. & Mrs. 'Lhomas % Mcguire 

Mr. & Mrs. Tatricfi^g. Mc%eever 

Mr. & Mrs. %, 'Bruce McLane, Jr. 

Sandra Andreas McMurtrie 

(Dr. & Mrs. Jose ^ Medina 

Mr. & Mrs. Tfomingo %. Moreira 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Morretta 

Martha S. Mugar 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Mulligan 

(Dr. & Mrs. %ene (B. (h[asser 

Lloyd & (Kathleen (h[gtan 

Mr. BeiverdT.. (h[eedies Patrons 475 



Jean & Jake 9\[ponan 

Mr. & Mrs. (David "W. O\[prton andjamiiy 

J arms T. & ^nne M. O 'Connor 

Qeorgt %u-bski, MOD 

Mr. & Mrs. ^cfiardj. Opozda 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard barker 

Mr. & Mrs. Amandio (Barroso (Pereira 

CaroCe & ^n Tierantoni 

Hipse & Joseph ^ottanat 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin J. %acaneiii 

Joseph & Cecelia %eardon 

Mr. & Mrs. "Donald J. %eid 

Mr. & Mrs. ^edro %eyes 

%gberi (D. "Riedy 

Anna-Mary & John ^ley and family 

Mr. & Mrs. Qeorge %gniano 

"Kichard "Kussell 

^ill& Valerie SalQ and family 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Schaefer 

Col.(USA;'Ret.) & Mrs. (David'E. Schorr 

(Dr. & Mrs. Werner Q. Schroffner 

Charles & Janet Shin 

Charles T. & (Bitsy %elly Smith 

Dr. &Mrs. Walter ^ StantezviclK'Ellen (P.) 

Mr. & Mrs. ^{ussellA. Stewart 

%pn & Anne Louise Strachan 

'Ellen M. Temmallo 

Mr. & Mrs. Angelo J. Trapani 

%gnaldj. & %ebecca A. ^solis 

Mr. & Mrs. Lyssimachos Vassilopoulos 

Michael & iKelen Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. %erry E. Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. (Peter J. Walsh, Jr. 

Mr. Theodore J. Weiner 

Mr. & Mrs. Qerald Shawn Wells > Sr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Wilson 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Wi^pn 

476 Patrons Mr. & Mrs. J'ou-Shan J'ang 



Silver Patrons 



Marilyn & Joe Antonik 
Peggy & Jim Beardsley 
Meg & Brooks Boveroux 
Donna L. Brock 
Anonymous Parent Supporter 
Dr. & Mrs. Julio Caban 
Mrs. Susan Freeling Can- 
Tim & Colleen Curtin 
Donald & Toby Daley 
Dr. & Mrs. Michael Delia Rosa 
Thomas J. Dempsey 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Denning 
Ms. Janina Doroszczyk 
Dr. & Mrs. Gerard J. Foye Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Irving J. Goss 
Stephen & Linda Hess 
Mr. & Mrs. William E. Kelley 
Mr. & Mrs. Hugh D. Kelly 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Kerrigan 
Joseph F. & Nancy F. Krowski 
Mr. & Mrs. Gregory W. Locraft 
Irene & John Maddocks 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Martin 
Mr. & Mrs. J.E. McCaffrey, Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. McCoy 
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. McKenna 
Dr. & Mrs. James E. Moorman 
Dr. & Mrs. John Niziol 
Jeanne & Jim O'Leary 
Dr. & Mrs. Michael T. O'Neil 
Dr. & Mrs. Frank A. Odium 
Sidney & Janice Paull 
Mr. & Mrs. R.D. Sawyer 
Mr. & Mrs. Scott C. Schurz 
Dr. & Mrs. Gerald A. Sieggreen 
Jack & Phyllis Smith 
Dr. & Mrs. Richard B. Sriubas 
Mr. & Mrs. John Staley 
Mr. & Mrs. D.P Sunderhaft 
Dr. & Mrs. Rudolph D. Talarico 
Mr. & Mrs. Roy F. Walters, Jr. 
Dr. & Mrs. Edward B. J. Winslow 



Patrons 477 



Mr. & Mrs. Jorge Adsuar 

Dr. & Mrs. Lito Alino 

Tony and Peggy Allen 

Carla G. Allen 

Marina Uriarte 

Mr. & Mi-s. Guy Aloisio 

Mr.& Mrs. John Amato and Family 

The Amery Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Sean Annitto 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Arth 

Joan Ashton 

Mr. & Mrs. Oscar C. Aubin 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Auger 

Michael W. & Kathleen Azzara 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Badon 

Dr. & Mrs. J.E. Bagenstose 

Mr. Stephen F. Bagnell 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Baiter 

Simon & Marie Bandar 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Bargon 

Douglas & Sandra Barker 

Ray & Donna Bamett 

Albert & Valerie Barrows 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen T. Barry 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Battaglia 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Berardi 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Bergin 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul D. Berk, Jr. 

Sara & Geoff Bible 

William & Roseann Bielen 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Birmingham 

Mr. & Mrs. David W. Blois 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Bolan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Boland 

Mr. & Mrs. Tim Borden 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. Boris 

The Boron Family 

Mary & Alfred J. Boulos 

Dr. & Mrs. James E. Bowers 

John & Joan Bowers 

Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Bowley 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Boyle 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald P. Brennan 

Dr. & Mrs. C. Edward Brennan, Jr. 

Don & Carolyn Brinkley 

Mr. & Mrs. William Broding 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Brooks 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Brown 

Ted & Rosemary Brown 



Daniel J. & Diane T. Browne 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Bucciaglia, Jr. 
George & Marie Buckley 
Karen & Mary Grace Burke 
Alan L. & Cynthia R. Butters 
Dr. & Mis. Roger Byrd 
Michael F. & Catherine M. Byrne 
Paul & Marilyn Cabral 
Mr. & Mrs. John F. Calmeyn 
David & Martha Campbell 
Donald & Madeleine Cannon 
Dr. William J. Caragol 
Anthony & Lucille Carbo 
Dr. & Mrs. Manuel Carbonell 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul V. Carelli III 
Joseph & Patricia Carignan 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Carletta 
Mr. & Mrs. Peter Carmichael 
Charles & Judith Cassara 
Mr. & Mrs. Philip Catalfomo 
Dr. & Mrs. J. Patrick Caulfield 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Chiarelli 
Mr. & Mrs. Edwin F. Chociey 
Mr. & Mrs. Philip P. Christopher 
Ml". & Mrs. Thomas E. Cimeno, Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Cirome 
Roberta & Gerard Claps 
Robert & Margaret Clark 
Eleanor & Nonnan Clausen 
Keith & Chiistine Clauss 
Dr. & Mrs. LaiTy J. Clemons 
Mr. & Mrs. C.R. Coffey 
Joseph & Eleanor Cogliano 
Mr. Richard Coleman 
Craig Coleman 
Ginny Concannon 
Mr. & Mrs. James P. Conley 
Frank & Ellen Connell 
Dr. & Mrs. James J. Connors 
Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Corron 
Mr. & Mrs. John J. Critchley 
Gail A. Cronan 
John C. & Jean A. Cronin 
Mr. & Mrs. Jolin D. Crowley 
Mr. & Mrs. Antonio Cucci 
Joseph & Eileen Curcio 
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Curley 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Curran 
Mr. & Mrs. William F. Dahdah 



Dr. & Mrs. Edward G. Dailey 

Kevin Davis' Family 

The Defrancesco Family 

L. Del Buono & Son 

Hortense & Thomas Delmastro 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Dellanno 

Gene & Marlene Desmond 

Mr. & Mrs. Gaston De Zarraga 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard J. Di luro Jr. 

Richard & Marsha DePerro 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Dilatush 

Richard Dobkin 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert J. Dobrzynski 

Carol & Emmett M. Dockery 

Mr. & Mrs. George J. Doehner 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward E. Donaldson 

W. Brian Donovan 

Dan & Carol Anne Donovan, Sr. 

John & Anne Doran 

Mr. & Mrs. Tim Dossey 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome L. Duffy 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Dunleavy 

Joan & Leo Dunphy 

John A. Dwyer 

Harold & Diann Eason 

William & Diane Ebben 

The "Phoenix" Egans 

Mrs. Henry J. Egan, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee Ehrenzeller 

Robert F. Eldridge Family 

Laurel K. Ellwein 

Bob & Alice England 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward L. Englert, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Enis 

Dr. & Mis. J. P. Eriksmoen 

Mr. & Mrs. Mario and Valeria Ermini 

Mr. & Mrs. Merle K. Evey 

Thomas Faherty, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Falcone 

Dr. & Mrs. John A Fallon 

Mr. & Mrs. John Famiano 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Farina 

Dennis & Mary Farmer 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Fearon 

Elizabeth & Bud Feeney 

Joseph & Evelyn Fehrenbach 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee Fentress 

The Finch Family 



478 Patrons 



ack & Elaine Finn 

)an & Rosemai)' Finora 

lay & Cindy Fish 

vlr. & Mrs. John J. Fitzgerald 

i. Joseph & Jacquehne B. (N'l.A.) 

^itzpatrick 

anet & John Fhinigiin 

vlr. & Mrs. C. Fleissner 

vlr. & Mrs. Mario Forcionc 

Nicholas & Helen Forsa 

(oseph A. Forte 

vlr. & Mrs. Paul Foumier 

Vlr. & Mrs. Theodore L. Freeman 

lonald & Linda Gabbett 

Vlr. & Mrs. Eugene R. Gaeta 

Vlr. & Mrs. Robert M. Gaeta 

3a\ id & Michelle Gain 

loe & Sue Gama 

Vlr. & Mrs. Richard J. Ganong 

Vlr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Gaughan 

.Robert & Dona Geotfroy 

iiomeo C. Gervasini 

Vlr. & Mrs. Robert B. Giese 

Steve & Anita Gildea 

Vlr. & Mrs. George Gilkin 

Vlr. & Mrs. E.F. Gillespie 

Kyle Gillietti 

Mr. & Mrs. Da\'id R. Giunta 

Anthony J. Godino 

Gar>' & Pat Good 

Susan & John Gorman 

Dr. & Mrs. Albert Gosen 

John F. & Heather A. Gossart 

Samuel E. Gourley 

Joseph & Rose Marie Graceffo 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael I. Grady 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick H. Graefe 

Richard Graff 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Grossman 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick G. Guarino 

The Guzman Family 

Eugene & Nora Hahn 

Robert & Donna Hainey 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Haney 

Drs. John & Kathryn Hasenjaeger 

Jim & Maureen Hayden 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Helin 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund L. Henault 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward W. Herbert 

Joseph G. Herbstritt 

Eugene V. Herrmann, Jr. 

Marjorie & Kai Heyer 

Mr. & Mrs. James Higgins 

Tom & Christine Hitchcock 

Cohn & Roberta Ho 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Hofmann 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Hogan. Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Homuna 



Mr. & Mrs. Williatn J. Horrigan 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Huot 

David H. C. Huang 

The Huertas Family 

Dr. & Mrs. David Huerler 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene C. Humphrey 

Dr. & Mrs. Riaz Hussain 

Mr. & Mrs. David R. Hyde 

Mr. & Mrs. A.L. Hyland 

Dr. & Mrs. John Irons 

Sue & Bob Isbell 

Mr. & Mrs. Richrad Jacbson 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent J. Jacob 

Alexander & Ann Marie Janow 

James Januzzi 

Edward & Elizabeth Jeep 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward W. Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Robert Kaczor 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Kaczor 

Andreas & Maria Kaiafas 

Mr. & Mrs. Austin M. Kaimes Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Kanaczet 

Eileen & Tony Kane 

Dr. & Mrs. Henry Kankowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond F. Kasperzak 

Mr. & Mrs. John Keene 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Barackman 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald A. Kelley Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel M. Kelly 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas G. Kempken 

John & Barbara Keenan 

Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert Kettles 

Dr. & Mrs. M. Khorsandi 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Kilkenny 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. King 

Gertrude C. Kokkonen 

Mr. & Mrs. Morton Kondracke 

Dr. & Mrs. Lorrin M. Koran 

Dr. & Mrs. Russell R. Kraegen 

Raymond & Eunice Krawczuk 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Kreuder 

Mr. & Mrs. Dean Kueter 

Richard & Judy Kuhlmann 

Larry & Karen Kurtzon 

Jerome & Joanne L. LaManna 

Dr. & Mrs. Roger LaGratta 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Landfield 

Henry & Patricia Lane 

Dr. & Mrs. Jerald P. Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. Alan L. Langridge 

John & Yvette LaQuerre 

Angelo LaSala 

Marilyn Cullinane Lawrence 

Amey & Thomas R. Lawson. Jr. 

Selena & Charles Lein 

Arthur W. and Marina M. Lenhardt 

Mr. & Mrs. Giuseppe Letteri 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip Lewallen 



Mr. & Mrs. Wallace L. Lewis Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. James S. Lewis 

Dr. & Mrs. Frank A. Lizzi 

Dr. & Mrs. Angela J. Lopano 

The Loysen Family 

Frank & Kathleen Lucas 

Mr. & Mrs. James Lucchese 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Lytle 

Mr. & Mrs. William Ma 

Mary & Burke MacDonald 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul D. MacElhiney 

Mr. & Mrs. Bill Madden 

Paul A. Maffeo 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Malier 

John & Aviva Mallary 

Sandie & Ron Malloy 

Dr. & Mrs. Roberi E. Maloney 

James & Therese Manfield, Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Benedict S. Maniscalo 

Wellington T. Mara 

Dr. & Mrs. Louis Marchioli 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Marmion 

Jorge E. Martel 

David Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. McGurl 

Thomas Mazzeo 

James Mc Adams Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank B. McBrearity, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. McCarthy 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward J. McCartin 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas H. McCourt 

Dolores McCready 

Mr. & Mrs. William McEnaney 

Mr. & Mrs. Brian E. McFariand 

McGillion Family 

Keith & Judith McKeen 

Philip & Mary Mead 

Bill & Nancy Melia 

Maureen & Frank Meloni 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Meo 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Meola 

Robert R. Miles 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Milford 

Mrs. J. Hoyt Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. Loren R. Miller III 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Anthony Mitchell 

Mrs. Susan E. Moar 

James & Mary Ann Monge 

Jeanne Montenegro 

Judith & Steven Montesi 

Mr. & Mrs. George E. Moonan 

Michael & Anita Moran 

George C. Morfesi 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Christopher Mortenson 

Stephen Gunn Mosgrove 

Edward & Patricia Muldoon 

Pauline Murray 



Patrons 479 



Mr. & Mrs. Eugene J. Murret 

Mr. & Mrs. Sudhakar Nagardeolekar 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Nedder 

Judith A. Newkirk 

Mr. & Mrs. V. Nicolazzojr. 

Peter & Gail Noon 

Francis & Christine Noonan 

John F. O'Brien 

George & Jan O'Brien 

Eugene & Marie O'Brien 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. O'Callaghan 

Joseph & Maureen O'Doherty 

Mr. & Mrs. James V. O'Grady 

Josephine O'Malley 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas F. O'Meara 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. O'Malley 

Maurice & Christina O'Shea 

John K. O 'Toole Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen C. Olney 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Olsen 

Ralph & Norma Orefice 

Barbara & Matk Overland 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Owens 

Richard & Dorothy Paluck 

James B. & Marie B. Panther 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerard R. Parent 

Ruth E. Parsons 

Dr. & Mrs. Jashbhai K. Patel 

Joseph K. Paul, Sr. 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Paulhus 

Judith L. Pavano 

Mr. & Mrs. Russell L. Peach & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Pecoraro 

LTC & Mrs. Paul A. Pelletier 

Mr. & Mrs. Terrance R. Pelnick 

Joseph G. Penarczyk 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Pentz 

Dr. & Mrs. Enrique Perinetti 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Petrucelli 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard John Petsche 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Picemo 

James V. Politan 

Mr. & Mrs. William Powers 

Vasant & Barbara Prabhu 

Joseph & Valerie Radzik 

Dr. & Mrs. Jose Raffinan, Jr. 

Beverly A. Rasmussen 

Dr. & Mrs. James Raynor 

Mr. & Mrs. David Redmond 

Mr. & Mrs. John A Reed, Jr. 

John & Alice Reed 

Frederic J. Regenye 

Frank J. Remshak 

Pablo Reyes, MD. 

John & Edith Ricciardi 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick C. Rimmele, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Roberts 

Mano & Mary Ann Rodolakis 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Romanelli 



Dr. Joseph Rose 

Dr. & Mrs. Jose A. Rosell 

Mr. & Mrs. Don S. Ross 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip N. Rubin 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Russak 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Ryan 

Lou & Nancy Sajda 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Santangelo 

Vincent & Joan Santoro 

Michael & Rosemary Santoro 

Denny & Terry Saunders 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Scaro 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Schack 

Dr. & Mrs. Gerard Schilling 

Ml-. & Mrs. Wm. J. Schneider 

Robert & Antoinette Schroder 

Theodore A. Schwartz, Esq. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Sciaretta 

Marianne & Roy Scott 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Settanni 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Sheahan 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Sheridan 

Erika P. Shull 

Mickey & Arline Signorella 

Ann Simonian 

Dean & Lucille Singlewald 

Dr. & Mrs. Roger Smith 

Dr. & Mrs. Gordon Somerville 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Stefanowicz 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark W. Stephens 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Sulhvan 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis X. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Sullivan 

Tony & Sharon Suppelsa 

Ml-. & Mrs. Joseph Surrichio 

Thomas & Bridget Taggart 

Karen & Geoff Tapper 

Tracy M. Tarby 

Tavemi Family 

Francis & Veronica Taylor 

Dr. & Mrs. Brendan Teehan 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward R. Terciak 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Thompson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Thomson 

Lorraine Thomson-McGivem 

Fred & Melody Timpson 

Jim & Lorraine Todd 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Tolocka 

Joe & Joan Tomei 

Carlos & Laura Toro 

Mr. & Mi-s. Theodore Tsukahara, Jr. 

Dennis M. & Mary Alice Tulimieri 

Dermis & Linda Twomey 

Dr. & Mrs. William A. Tyler, Jr. 

Peter & Gael Ulisse 

Mr. & Mi-s. Jolin W. Vanderkieft in 

Jerry & Nancy Varnum 

Dr. & Mi-s. Eric M. Vihlen 

Mr. & Mrs. George A. Voegele 



Mr. & Mrs. James F. Votta 

Erica Waldron 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Waldron 

Bill & Polly Webster 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Weiss 

Mr. & Mrs. David I. Welz 

Joyce & Ronald Wessel 

Judith & Richard West 

John & Mary Ann Whelan 

Beverly White 

Mr. & Mrs. George Williams 

Ronald J. & Diane D. Wilson 

Mr. & Mrs. Chung Guck Wong 

Cathy & Travers Wood 

Dr. Gary E. Wyard 

Mr. & Mrs. L. T. Young 

Mr. & Mi-s. John M. Yuen, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Zarillo 

Mr. & Mrs. Owen C. Zidar 



480 Patrons 



ull Serif ice ^ 
Top Qualify - 

> Quick Turnaround 
Wo Guaranloo All Throo 



.. business communication center 
I lower lobby, prudential tower 



boston, ma 02199 
(617)262-3920 (fax) 262 - 6442 

your one-stop printing & copying service 

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Oosktop Publishing 

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.c. press 

>59 higgins hall 

boston college 

(Chestnut hill, ma 02167 I. 

552 - 3418 & 9 (fax) 552 - 3319 

boston college's on-campus one-stop prints hop 



Full In-House Bindery 
Bulk Mailing Services 
laminating 
& Much More 



The Office of University Housing thanks and congratulates 

all members of the Resident Staff, especially those in the 

Class of 1992. Your service, dedication, and loyalty to 

Boston College set new standards of excellence. 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 

Residential Life 



Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 

Operations/ 

Financial Management 

Robert F. 

Capalbo, Ph.D. 

Director 




Advertisers 481 



"You're only young once, 
but you can be immature forever." 

We here at Y.D.D.® know how important your future is. That is why 
we support a seven month training program for new employees, with 
courses ranging from Medieval horse training to bungee jumping off 
large prehistoric animals. We feel a well-rounded employee is the best 
employee, and a well-satisfied customer pretty cool. Congratulations 
to all B.C. students who will join our company! 

Y.D.D.® 

Where the world 
Is a globe. 




Y.D.D.® Yabba Dabba Do 









Top Ten Ways You Know 
You're in an Easy Class 




mm] 






OF BOSTON COLLEGE 


BESTWISHE 


:S TO THE CU 


^SSOF 1991 








10. 


The teacher hasn t done the required 
reading either. 


Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 


9. 


Brandon or Dylan: The debate 
rages on. 


•Alumni Career Network 


8. 


MTV is a valid footnote. 


•Current Job Listings 


7. 


Reflection paper is multiple choice. 




6. 


Textbooks come with swimsuit issue. 


•Career Resource Library 


5. 


Teacher still can't believe they 


•Job Search Workshops /Career Programs 




cancelled Alf. 




4. 


"Hey, Vern" guy is guest speaker. 


•Individual Appointments 


3. 


"The dog ate my exam" is a 


•Evening Hours on Mondays 




valid excuse. 


during the academic year 


2. 


Literacy is not a prerequisite. 




1. 


You're sitting in Dan Qualye's old desk. 


482 Advertisers 













Hunter Publishing Co 



A Division ofjostens, Inc., 

Would like to congratulate Sub 
Turri's graduating seniors: 

Cathy Alecci, Joanna Arong, 
Bridget Barry, Chris Benjamin, 
Heide Bronke, James Conner, 
David Finn, Kelly Flynn, Kerri 
Hiltunen, Kevin Keating, Maura 
Morse, Kelsey O'Brien, Ronna 
Reyes, Hans Schemmel, Cheryl 
Simrany, Tina Ting, Christine 
Weiner, and Annmarie Wixon. 






Advertisers 483 



1 992 Sub Turri Staff 




Cheryl Simrany and Heide Bronke 
Photography Editors 



484 Photography Editors 



Photography Staff 



LIVf.fl 




Alexandra Gianinno, Tina Ting, Paul Hezel, Kevin Keating, and Joanna Arong. 

Not pictured: Sue Brown, Christine Cerrato, Bill Meehan, Maura Morse, Hans 
Schemmel, and Matt West. 



Photography Staff 485 



V 




Editor: 

David Finn 



Staff: James Conner, Ronna Reyes 



5150 Cabo Wabo 




MCWkKKXIV 



" J ± 



Our love is god.. . .Let's go get a Slushie. 

J.D. 

Chaos is what killed the Dinosaurs! 

.,..-t.D. 

I will show you fear in a hand full of dust. 

T^S. Eliot 

Some people enter this industry looking for fame, for 
me it's the music that's important. ^ 

Edward Van Halen 




Activities 




We should live while these 

moments are still called today. 

Take part in the pain of this 

passion play. 

Stretching our youth as we 

must. 

Until we are ashes to dust. 

Until time makes history of us. 

-Indigo Girls 



Activities Co-Editors: 

Beth Farrell and Phuong Bui. 




Activities Copy Staff 



Diane DeGiorgio 
Mark Donahue 
Alison Logrip 
Joe Plurad 
Andrea Schaffer 



Activities Staff 487 



STUDENT 
LIFE STAFF 




Kathleen Haley 

Editor 



Beth Ahmuty 

Assistant Editor 



David Shapiro 

Layout/Copy 



488 Student Life Staff 



Staff 

Bridget Barry 



SPORTS 




EDITORS 



Kelly Moran '93 
Kevin Sullivan '93 



STAFF: 



Liz McGuire '93 
Steve Antonik '95 
Stacey Di Jon '95 



Being both Irish and cynical, we would like to leave you with these few thoughts 
from our favorite philospher — 



Murphy's Law: Murphy was an Optimist 



If you try to please everybody, nobody will like it. 

You will always find something in the last place you look. 

If you fool around with something for very long, you will screw it up. 

In any hierarchy, each individual rises to his own level of 

incompetence and then remains there. 
When in doubt, mumble. When in trouble, delegate. 
If you think everything is going well, you obviously don't know what 

the hell is going on. 
If more than one person is responsible for a miscalculation, no one 

will be at fault. 
In case of doubt, make it sound convincing. 
By Celestial Arts, Inc. 

Thanks to Cathy, Armmarie, and Kerry for making next year's book that much easier. 

May these laws be unnecessary. We will definately miss you! 

Sports Editors 489 




» 



Senior Editor: Kelsev O'Brien 

Senior Section Editors 




he Business Staff 



Christine Weiner 

Manager 

John Pierantoni Jim Darrow 

Asst. Manager Asst. Manager 





Dear John & Jim, 
Well done, gentlemen! 

That certain "je ne sais 

quoi " you both possess has 

been of immeasurable help 

to me this year. I cannot 

thank you enough! 

The most profound 'pearl of 

wisdom' I can leave you with 

comes from the 

French philosopher Pierre 

Teilhard de Chardin: 

Nothing is profane for those 
who know how to see. 

Best of luck in '93 ! 

-C. M. W. 



Business Staff 491 



Photos by Heide M. Bronke ; 



Kerri Hiltunen 

Associate Editor 



My heart's in the Highlands, my heart's 

not here, 
My heart's in the Highlands, a-chasing 

the deer; 
A-chasing the wild deer, and following 

the roe, 
My heart 's in the Highlands wherever I 

go- 

—Robert Burns 



Tha mo ghaol ort, Iain. 



Chris Benjamin 

Copy Editor 



But this 'ale river keeps on 

rolling though 

No matter what gets in the way 

Or which way the wind does 

blow 

An ' as long as it does I'll just sit 

here 

And watch the river flow. 

— Bob Dylan 



492 Copy Editors 





I 



ANNMARIE WIXON 

MANAGING EDITOR 



— It is almost impossible to comprehend the amount of work involved in putting together 
a yearbook of such magnitude unless one has actually had the opportunity to be involved 
in the process. There is one person I cannot go without thanking — Cathy Alecci, Editor- 
in-Chief of Sub Turri. To call her highly dedicated would do her an injustice. She has, on 
numerous occasions, put yearbook ahead of her personal life. She has been there to sup- 
port and encourage each of us on the staff — especially during the times we thought we'd 
never make it through the next deadhne. I know I speak for the entire Sub Turri staff when 
I say that without her, this book would never have materialized. Cathy, I shall forever 
remember the night of the Miami game, the music blaring until all hours of the night 
before a deadline, and Pino's Pizza. They will always remind me of our days and nights in 
McElroy 103 and of you. You have been a great boss, a wonderful editor and a remarkable 
friend. 

— THANK YOU to all the staff members. GOOD LUCK next year!! 

— I could not leave B.C. without thanking my Mom and Dad. The love and support (not to 
mention the financial assistance) that you have given me over the years has given me a 
solid foundation on which to grow. As graduation draws near, I realize that you have 
done your job well. I am ready now to leave and try life on my own, for I know that no 
matter where life takes me, you'll always be there for me and I for you. I love you. 

— Michele, you are the best roommate (and sister) I will ever have. I love you. 

— BEB, Clooney and Kona: After four years I finally got it right. Remember, you have BEB 
to thank. Thank you guys for being such good friends. I love each of you very much. 

— To the men of 304 (and Nee-Nee): New York, Kevin playing in the mud puddles, pool, 
taping Jimmy to the bed. Homecoming, obtaining the Christmas tree, "What did I do to 
deserve this flat, flavorless Manhattan?", Beauty and the Beast, "She thinks I'm cute." 

— To my favorite music snob: "There's no truth like the truth you dare to let yourself see." 
The Alarm. You have been a tremendous source of inspiration for me throughout this 
year. I am eternally grateful. The wonderful memories of this past year will remain with 
me forever. Although I don't always show it, I hope you know how important you are to 



me. 




Managing Editor 493 



Cathy Alecci 
Editor-in-Chief 



Ihe reason I love 
conducting is that I 
love the people I 
conduct, and I love 
the people for whom 
we play." 

^Leonard 
Bernstein 



Instead of writing about how sad I 
am this whole experience is over, 
and how great a book this is (and 
it is), I am simply going to use 
this space to write my thanks to 
the Staff. Thank you: 

Russell, our computer-saver! 

Cheryl and Heide, and all the 
photographers, for managing to 
take fantastic photos, despite the 
often stress of your situation. 

Kelly and Kelsey for the best 
senior section ever , and for not 
hating me for giving you year- 
book nightmares! 

Beth and Phoung, for never 
exactly making your deadlines 
—but instead always submitting 
extra pages! 

David, for doing an excellent 
job of taking over, and for keep- 
ing my life interesting. 




I 



Kathleen and her staff for a 
fantastic section. Good luck, next 
year, senorita. 

Kelly and Kevin, not only for a 
perfect job, but also for the laugh- 
ter, including the "headlines-that- 
never-made-the-book." Good luck 
to the both of you next year, as 
well. 

Christine and the business staff 
for the record breaking patron 
campaign, and for making this 
book financially possible! 

Chris, Reena, and Kerri for 
Perspectives. Also to Kerri for all 
her help with copy, and her 
persistance in tracking people 



down for photos! 

Bridget and James for their 
entertaining yet professional 
copy on such quick notice. 

And last, but most certainly 
not least, to Annmarie, for all her 
time in making this book pos- 
sible, and for all the late nights 
and long hours spent in the 
office listening to 'Beauty and 
Beast,' discussing our lives and 
trying to figure out men. You are 
indeed a true friend. Thank you. 

To every staff member, I thank 
you again. Continue to make the 
most out of your lives— 



494 Editor-in-Chief 



special Thanks to: 

Mr. Arnie Lohmann, our wonderful yearbook 
representative from Jostens. 

Mr. Howard Legge, our portrait photogra- 
pher, for a superb job. 

Mr. Rick Brooks, who created our stunning 
cover. 

Ms. Jacqui Bazin, our customer service repre- 
sentative in North Carolina, for making our 
lives easier. 

Father Richard McGowan, our faculty 
advisor. 

Everyone at Hunter Publishing, for their hard 
work and dedication to quality. 

The Class of 1992. 

Parents, alumni, and faculty for their 
support. 

The Quote Wall, Rex Harrison and Julie 
Andrews, Pino's Pizzeria, the Love Couch 
and its many memories, Harry Connick Jr., 
Elfin Magic, and any one or any thing who 
contributed in any way to this yearbook. 



Colophon 

The 1992 edition of Sub Turri was 
printed by Hunter Publishing Com- 
pany, a division of Jostens, in Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. The 80th 
volume had a press run of 2400 copies. 
Pages were printed using 100% black 
ink, with pages 17-464 on dull stock 80 
lb. paper, and pages 1-16 on lustro text 
90 lb. paper. Can you dig it, baby? End 
sheets, as well as opening and divider 
pages, used half tone Elephant Hide B 
screen. End sheets are Sundance Felt 
paper, in Bright White. Oh no, I have 
an ulcer. The cover is maroon on 
Mission #1212 grain, with gold foil. 
Each cover is hand rubbed with black 
ink to enhance the detail in the design. 
The cover and end sheets were de- 
signed by Rick Brooks, of Jostens, State 
College, Pennsylvania. Mr. Brooks 
also provided the inspiration for our 
opening and divider pages. The 
primary type style is 12 pt. Palatino. 
Headline styles were determined by 
each section editor. Chaos killed the 
dinosaurs. Spreads for the Senior and 
Activities sections were done on Aldus 
Pagemaker, using Yeartech templates, 
and printed on a Macintosh laser 
printer. All color photos were made 
from color transparencies of photo- 
graphs taken by Sub Turri photo staff. 
Seniors portraits were taken by 
Howard Legge, of Yearbook Associates 
in Millers Falls, MA. Black and white 
film was developed, printed, and 
processed by the Photography staff. 

Colophon 495 



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496 Carpe Diem